who started hoover crip? 107 HCG?

Discuss general Black gangs in Los Angeles County which include Bloods, Crips, Hustlers, Crews and Independent groups in Los Angeles County here.
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bgcasper
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Re: who started hoover crip? 107 HCG?

Unread post by bgcasper » March 9th, 2017, 3:42 am

og hawk is givin big info on who how and when and were 107 got started https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N35fXyH3KpQ

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Re: who started hoover crip? 107 HCG?

Unread post by ViciousRidah » March 9th, 2017, 5:13 am

bgcasper wrote:107 defenetly not defunct ...they still hold budlong to normandi not as activ as there were but they aint defunct ..the 112 well a bit like 1st ecc they still exist just not in they hood
They're not defunct but I hear from OG groovs themselves they only have like 1 or 2 blocks of their original hood and they are pretty much living the 92x 94 Hoovers hood.

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Re: who started hoover crip? 107 HCG?

Unread post by bgcasper » March 9th, 2017, 5:38 am

yes i dont contradict that ..they far from what they use to ..selo was one of the hardest hoover in the days

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Re: who started hoover crip? 107 HCG?

Unread post by bgcasper » March 9th, 2017, 9:11 am

talkin about hoover ...anybody saw those hits up of es ftp x and h94vers hittin up together ???

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Re: who started hoover crip? 107 HCG?

Unread post by xxx » March 9th, 2017, 12:01 pm

112H lost their Land.

They function in 107 Hood.

So they are a nomad gang like 1st ECC.

The members are still alive, they just dont have no home.

This is starting to be the norm across Los Angeles County.

Major of Gang members live outside their Neighborhood.
Demographics has made most gang members weekend warriors.

But 11-2 is defunct as far as having territory. They dont even come visit on weekends.

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Re: who started hoover crip? 107 HCG?

Unread post by alexalonso » March 10th, 2017, 8:33 pm

xxx wrote:112H lost their Land.

They function in 107 Hood.

So they are a nomad gang like 1st ECC.

The members are still alive, they just dont have no home.

This is starting to be the norm across Los Angeles County.

Major of Gang members live outside their Neighborhood.
Demographics has made most gang members weekend warriors.

But 11-2 is defunct as far as having territory. They dont even come visit on weekends.
107 is kind of the same way, they used to have 104th & Budlong. I spoke to OG Devil and he told me they used to kick it on 104th & Budlong, and there is no Hoover activity at all over there anymore.

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Re: who started hoover crip? 107 HCG?

Unread post by alexalonso » March 10th, 2017, 8:33 pm

bgcasper wrote:talkin about hoover ...anybody saw those hits up of es ftp x and h94vers hittin up together ???
post some pics.

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Re: who started hoover crip? 107 HCG?

Unread post by bgcasper » March 11th, 2017, 12:58 am

alex im in puerto princessa philipinnes ,,,i would love to lolol

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Re: who started hoover crip? 107 HCG?

Unread post by bgcasper » March 11th, 2017, 1:01 am

wait found that in google earth ...by the way who own the partments on golden ?
Attachments
ftp 94hoova.jpg
ftp 94hoova.jpg (379.57 KiB) Viewed 8182 times
es ftp x ws h94ver.jpg
es ftp x ws h94ver.jpg (383.22 KiB) Viewed 8182 times

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Re: who started hoover crip? 107 HCG?

Unread post by bgcasper » March 11th, 2017, 1:08 am

golden i know its supposed h94ver but them apartment had few hits up that say hcm and zero 18 st so i was wonderin on vatos side who been owning golden apartments ? and there was a watts 13 hit up unwacced

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Re: who started hoover crip? 107 HCG?

Unread post by bgcasper » March 11th, 2017, 2:15 am

[quote="alexalonso"][quote="xxx"]112H lost their Land.

They function in 107 Hood.

So they are a nomad gang like 1st ECC.

The members are still alive, they just dont have no home.

This is starting to be the norm across Los Angeles County.

Major of Gang members live outside their Neighborhood.
Demographics has made most gang members weekend warriors.

But 11-2 is defunct as far as having territory. They dont even come visit on weekends.[/quote]

107 is kind of the same way, they used to have 104th & Budlong. I spoke to OG Devil and he told me they used to kick it on 104th & Budlong, and there is no Hoover activity at all over there anymore.[/quote]i just checc online there is a court case about a bust in 104 and budlong on the church prking lot...but they say that set is 900 deep


On May 8, 2008, Los Angeles Police Department (LAPD) Officer Pete Cabral, along with Officers Larson and Geoghegan, were monitoring the parking lot of a church located on South Figueroa Street near 104th Street in Los Angeles.   Officer Cabral's narcotics unit had received complaints about drug sales in the general area where the church was located.   At approximately 5:30 p.m., Officer Cabral saw defendant and a woman, later identified as Larisha Barnes (Barnes), standing in the parking lot near a car with its hood up.   Over a period of 20 to 30 minutes, Officer Cabral witnessed the following transaction approximately 10 times:  a person (the buyer) would engage defendant in a brief conversation and then hand defendant some paper currency.   Defendant would take the currency and then look toward Barnes, who was standing approximately five feet away.   Barnes would reach into her pants and pull out a clear plastic bag that contained a number of off-white rocks that resembled rock cocaine.   Each rock within the clear plastic bag was individually wrapped in plastic.   Barnes would hand the rock to defendant, who in turn would hand the rock to the buyer.   The buyer would leave the parking lot through an adjacent alley.

After observing these transactions, Officer Cabral saw a man, later identified as Lee Simmons (Simmons), approach defendant.   Simmons handed defendant some paper currency.   Barnes retrieved a clear plastic bag from her pants and removed a rock that resembled rock cocaine.   She handed the rock to defendant, who handed it to Simmons.   Like the other buyers, Simmons left the lot through the adjacent alley.   Once in the alley and away from defendant's line of sight, the officers approached Simmons and displayed their badges.   Officer Cabral saw Simmons open his right hand and toss a white rock to the sidewalk.   Officer Cabral retrieved the rock thrown by Simmons and arrested him.

After placing Simmons in custody, Officers Cabral and Geoghegan approached defendant and Barnes in the parking lot.   Defendant and Barnes were with a man, later identified as Michael Griffin (Griffin), who the officers had not previously seen during their surveillance of the parking lot.   The officers arrested defendant and Barnes for the drug sales, and Griffin, who had two outstanding warrants.

At the scene, Officer Cabral searched defendant and found $361 in defendant's front pants pocket.   There were thirty-one $1 bills, ten $5 bills, three $10 bills, ten $20 bills, and one $50 bill.   Officer Geoghegan searched Barnes and recovered a green leafy substance that resembled marijuana.   At the station, Officer Geoghegan performed a strip search of Barnes and found a clear plastic bag containing 26 off-white rocks individually wrapped in plastic.   An LAPD criminalist testified that the rocks in the clear plastic bag found on Barnes and the rock discarded by Simmons prior to his arrest contained cocaine base.

LAPD Officer Melvin Hernandez testified as the prosecution's gang expert.   According to Officer Hernandez, the sale of narcotics provides criminal street gangs with revenue to buy additional narcotics as well as weapons, such as rifles and handguns.   A criminal street gang is protective of its territory, and any person who is not a member of the gang must pay the gang with money or drugs in order to sell drugs within the gang's territory.   Once a criminal street gang establishes a territory and sufficiently terrorizes the people who live in that territory, the gang can commit whatever crimes, including illegal drug sales, it desires without fear that community members will inform the authorities or testify against the gang's members.   The members of a criminal street gang “put in work” for their gang by selling drugs, robbing and killing people, and breaking into people's homes.

Officer Hernandez testified that the Hoover Criminals gang is one of the largest criminal street gangs in South Los Angeles.   It claims as its territory a large part of South Los Angeles, including the location where defendant and Barnes were selling drugs on May 8, 2008.   The Hoover Criminals gang has approximately 900 members, and is composed of various sects, including the 107 Hoovers.   The primary activities of the Hoover Criminals and its sects include selling narcotics, assaults, burglaries, drive-by shootings, and murders.

Officer Hernandez testified that defendant was an active member of the Hoover Criminals gang (107 Hoovers sect) at the time he committed the drug sales in question.   Multiple field interview cards from 2001 through 2008 showed defendant admitting membership in the 107 Hoovers sect and using the moniker “Ace.” Defendant has the word “Ace” tattooed on his arm.

The prosecutor used several hypothetical questions to elicit Officer Hernandez's opinion whether the underlying offense was committed for the benefit of a gang and had the intent to promote criminal conduct by gang members.   In response to these questions, Officer Hernandez opined that when a known gang member sells rock cocaine in territory claimed by his gang, his conduct is consistent with activity that is done for the benefit of the gang with the intention to further criminal conduct by the gang.   According to Officer Hernandez, by selling drugs, the gang member earns money for the gang to “sustain [itself].”   The gang uses proceeds from drug sales to buy additional drugs and weapons to protect itself.   Additionally, proceeds from drug sales are used to purchase clothes, cars, and jewelry, items that serve as effective recruiting tools for prospective gang members in low income communities.

II. Defense

Barnes testified that prior to her arrest, she lived with Simmons, provided in-home care to Simmons, and regularly smoked rock cocaine with Simmons.   On May 8, 2008, Barnes received a telephone call from Griffin, her boyfriend at the time, asking her to meet him at the parking lot.   When Barnes arrived, she saw defendant and Griffin replacing the spark plugs in a car.   At one point, Simmons approached Barnes in the parking lot and asked her for some rock cocaine.   Barnes had two pieces of rock cocaine in her pocket, along with marijuana.   She gave one of the pieces to Simmons and he left.   Simmons did not give Barnes any money for the rock cocaine.   After Simmons left, Barnes remained in the parking lot with defendant and Griffin, both of whom were not aware that Barnes was carrying rock cocaine.   Police officers approached them approximately 10 minutes later with their guns drawn.   Police officers accused defendant of hiding drugs on his body and one officer reached into defendant's pants.   The officers arrested defendant, Barnes, and Griffin.3

Griffin testified that on May 8, 2008, he and defendant were replacing the spark plugs in defendant's car.   They chose to do this at the church's parking lot because a mutual friend, who was a mechanic, lived nearby and could provide them with tools if necessary.   According to Griffin, no one approached defendant and gave defendant money while they were in the parking lot.   At one point, Barnes arrived at the parking lot to meet up with Griffin.   Five to 10 minutes after Barnes arrived, police officers approached and arrested the three of them.

DISCUSSION

Defendant does not dispute that he was a member of the Hoover Criminals gang at the time of his arrest, or that he was selling rock cocaine within that gang's territory.   He contends, however, that substantial evidence does not support the jury's gang finding because “no evidence was presented that could establish beyond a reasonable doubt that [defendant's] crime was for the benefit of a gang, or that he had the requisite intent.”

“The role of an appellate court in reviewing the sufficiency of the evidence is limited.   The court must ‘review the whole record in the light most favorable to the judgment below to determine whether it discloses substantial evidence-that is, evidence which is reasonable, credible, and of solid value-such that a reasonable trier of fact could find the defendant guilty beyond a reasonable doubt.’  [Citations.]  [¶] ․ But it is the jury, not the appellate court, which must be convinced of the defendant's guilt beyond a reasonable doubt.  [Citation.]  Therefore, an appellate court may not substitute its judgment for that of the jury.”  (People v. Ceja (1993) 4 Cal.4th 1134, 1138-1139.)   Thus, if the verdict is supported by substantial evidence, we must accord due deference to the trier of fact and not substitute our evaluation of a witness's credibility for that of the fact finder.  (People v. Ochoa (1993) 6 Cal.4th 1199, 1206.)   The substantial evidence standard applies to evidence in support of a criminal street gang enhancement.  (People v. Vy (2004) 122 Cal.App.4th 1209, 1224.)

We conclude there was substantial evidence to support the jury's finding that defendant committed the underlying offense for the benefit of, at the direction of, or in association with a criminal street gang with the specific intent to promote, further, and assist in criminal conduct by gang members (§ 186.22, subd. (b)(1)(A)).   There was undisputed evidence that defendant was a member of the Hoover Criminals gang, and that he was selling the cocaine base in a location that fell within territory claimed by the Hoover Criminals gang.   This evidence, coupled with Officer Hernandez's expert testimony that proceeds from drug sales enable the purchase of additional drugs, the procurement of weapons, and the recruitment of additional gang members for the Hoover Criminals gang, was sufficient to support the jury's finding.  (See People v. Ferraez (2003) 112 Cal.App.4th 925, 930-931 [evidence that defendant was a gang member who had permission to sell drugs in a territory claimed by a friendly gang coupled with expert's testimony that income from drug sales facilitates the purchase of narcotics and weapons by the gang was sufficient to support gang finding under section 186.22, subdivision (b)(1)(A) ].)

People v. Ramon (2009) 175 Cal.App.4th 843 (Ramon ), cited by defendant, is inapposite.   In that case, a deputy sheriff stopped the defendant and a passenger while the defendant was driving a stolen vehicle.   The sheriff found a loaded handgun underneath the driver's seat.   A check determined that the handgun was unregistered.   An expert testified that the defendant and the passenger were members of the Colonia Bakers criminal street gang and that the deputy sheriff had stopped them in territory claimed by the Colonia Bakers gang.  (Id. at p. 849.)   When asked how driving around in a stolen vehicle with an unregistered handgun could benefit the Colonia Bakers gang, the expert testified that a gang member could commit a number of future crimes with the vehicle and weapon, and then dispose of the vehicle and weapon without any ties to him.  (Id. at pp. 848-849.)

The Court of Appeal held that there was insufficient evidence to support the gang finding.   It reasoned that the expert's testimony was speculative and amounted to the following improper syllogism:  “that because the gun and the stolen vehicle could be used to facilitate the commission of a crime, and the Colonia Bakers commit crimes, the two must have been acting on behalf of the Colonia Bakers.”  (Ramon, supra, 175 Cal.App.4th at p. 849.)   In stark contrast, the expert in this case did not simply testify that appellant's act of selling cocaine base would facilitate some future crimes by the Hoover Criminals.   Rather, the expert testified that one of the primary activities of the Hoover Criminals is selling drugs and that the gang relies on revenue from drug sales to “sustain” itself by buying more drugs, procuring more weapons, and recruiting more gang members to commit additional crimes on behalf of the gang.  (People v. Gardeley (1996) 14 Cal.4th 605, 616-617 [expert opinion may form the basis from which a jury can find that the crime comes within the ambit of a section 186.22 gang enhancement].)   Unlike in Ramon, the expert's testimony in the present case, coupled with undisputed evide

nce that the defendant was a gang member who sold drugs within gang territory, was sufficient to establish that the underlying offense was gang related.

DISPOSITION

The judgment is affirmed.

NOT TO BE PUBLISHED IN THE OFFICIAL REPORTS.

CHAVEZ
another one came up its about a shooting and killing of ugc by selos and the police at that time gave them 107 street east of normandi as their hood

Davis and Nolan were shot sometime between midnight and 1:00 a.m. on February 28, 2009, as they left a party on 107th Street near Normandie Avenue. The area just west of Normandie Avenue was territory claimed by the Underground Crip gang. The area east of Normandie Avenue was claimed by the Hoover Criminals gang, also known as the Hoover gang or the Hoovers. Hoover gang members did not get along with the Underground Crips, whom they called by the derogatory term “Ugly Girls” or “U.G.’s” for short. Defendant was a member of a subset or clique of the Hoover gang.
Davis testified he and Nolan had been invited to the party on 107th Street by his nephew. They did not stay long as the attendees were in their 20’s, much younger than Davis and Nolan. Davis was not a gang member, was not from the neighborhood of the party, and did not know there was a gang rivalry in the area. As Davis was in the street about to get into his car on the driver’s side, and Nolan was standing on the sidewalk waiting to get in on the passenger side Davis saw a “Black kid” across the street, about 38 to 40 feet away. The kid, whom Davis identified in court as defendant, looked at them and then fired a gun in their direction. Davis had an unobstructed view of defendant and the street was brightly lit by streetlights. When detectives interviewed Davis in October 2009, he was able to select defendant’s photograph from a photographic lineup and identify him as the shooter. Davis also identified defendant at the preliminary hearing.
Davis was shot three times in the abdomen before he and Nolan turned and ran back in the direction of the party house. Davis took cover under a truck parked in the driveway of the house while Nolan tried to climb the fence. As Davis ran, he was struck by five more bullets in his back, wrist, and thumb. As he hid under the truck with one foot protruding, defendant approached and shot Davis again in his foot.
Nolan was struck by three bullets. One of the bullets passed through his liver and heart, killing him within minutes. Davis underwent surgery and remained hospitalized for five weeks. At the time of trial, Davis remained in physical therapy, still suffered from a bulging disc caused by a bullet strike near his spine, and attended a pain management class.
Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department Homicide Detective Richard Ramirez investigated the shooting. The case remained unsolved for several months because of an inability to obtain much information from Davis due to his medical condition. Detective Ramirez arranged to have the case profiled on the television program “L.A.’s Most Wanted” in early October 2009. Nolan’s mother, sister, and uncle appeared on the show and appealed to the public for information. A photograph of Nolan was displayed during the broadcast. The photograph showed Nolan in braids, the hairstyle he wore at the time of his death.
Not long thereafter, Sergeant Mark Marbach contacted Detective Ramirez with information received from a paid “confidential reliable informant” (CRI), Hebert Zamora (Zamora). Based upon Sergeant Marbach’s information, Detective Ramirez was able to put together the six-pack photographic lineup from which Davis selected defendant’s photograph.
Zamora had been an 18th Street gang member since the age of 13 years and was known as “Midget.” He later moved to the neighborhood that included the area claimed by the 11 Deuce Hoover subset of the Hoover gang. Zamora testified he was able to obtain information about Hoover gang members because he associated with some of them and his mother-in-law had once associated with the Hoover gang. Zamora knew defendant as a Hoover gang member whose moniker was “Tiny Snaps.” In October 2009, Zamora was driving around with defendant, “Bam Bam,” and “Tiny Box,” two members of the 107 Hoovers, another subset of the Hoover gang. Defendant pointed out a house on 107th Street near Normandie Avenue and said there had been a party there awhile back; defendant told Zamora that when he saw two “Ugly Girls” walking out of the house, “we had to shoot ‘em or whatever.” Defendant said that once the two men were outside the house, he said, “Fuck Ugly Girls,” and started shooting.
Defendant told Zamora he was with another “homeboy” who acted as a lookout at the time, but defendant did not give a name. The homeboy waited at the corner watching for the police while defendant shot the two men. Defendant then ran through an alley, disposed of the gun, and walked back to the crime scene to watch the police taping the area. Zamora testified it was a normal practice of gang members to go back to the scene to determine whether the victim had died. It was also normal for gang members to brag about committing such crimes as shootings, drug sales, and walk-up murders, because they served to enhance the reputation of the perpetrator within gang, and to intimidate neighborhood residents and rival gang members. Such crimes were known as “putting in work” for the gang. Zamora testified that a gang member would not brag falsely because other gang members would investigate and impose a “strike” on the member who claimed to have committed someone else’s crime.
Sometime later defendant complained to Zamora that the victim’s sister or mother had made “a big deal out of the shooting” and she had to be stopped. The next day Zamora contacted Sergeant Marbach. Defendant was arrested in early October 2009 for a gang injunction violation while he was in the company of Kevin Adams and another man. Later that month, while defendant was in custody, Detective Ramirez arranged to have defendant placed near CRI Cleveland Ross (Ross), another Hoover gang member who was also in custody. Just prior to placing defendant in the informant’s cell, Detective Ramirez and his partner interviewed defendant and informed him he was suspected of shooting Davis and Nolan. Defendant’s interview was recorded and played for the jury. Defendant’s nearly five-hour conversation with Ross was also recorded and portions of it were played for the jury.
Before being placed near Ross, defendant gave his name, age, address and other information to a deputy sheriff; he told the deputy that he was called “Slim” and associated with “One Twelve Hoover.” When speaking to Ross, defendant said, “They called me off to homicide. I don’t know -- Little Kevin . . . snitched on us.” Twice more in the conversation, defendant guessed that Kevin or “they” had snitched on him. Later, defendant sang, “I love Hoover” and “Hoover loves me.” He also said, “The detectives fucked up. They didn’t fingerprint me.”
In April 2010, Sergeant Marbach told Detective Ramirez about another incarcerated informant, a gang member known as “Kill Kill,” who had agreed to cooperate in exchange for leniency in his case. Detective Ramirez briefed Kill Kill on some of the facts of the shooting: that it had occurred in February 2009 on 107th Street as two men, one wearing braids, walked out of a party. In order to stimulate a conversation with the informant, Detective Ramirez told defendant that he had been identified as a suspect in the shooting. The detective then had defendant placed in the same cell as Kill Kill.
A recording of defendant’s conversation with Kill Kill was played for the jury. At the beginning of the conversation, defendant told Kill Kill he was “Baby Snap” and “from 112 Street Hoover.” Defendant thought his “homies” might snitch on him and said, “I know that nigger from UG that died. . . . His mama know my auntie.” Later, when Kill Kill asked, “You sure didn’t nobody see you right?” defendant said, “I don’t know, man. I do my shit in -- I don’t never -- do you feel me? I’m a type of foot type nigger, you know.” This prompted Kill Kill to suggest he was a “JOB,” to which defendant replied, “Do you feel me?” When Kill Kill suggested, “Look, one of the niggers had braids, huh?” defendant confirmed, “Yeah.”
Gang expert Detective White explained that “JOB” meant “jump out boy” and was a term used for gang members who had been involved in several shootings, whether by jumping from a car or shooting on foot. It was his opinion that defendant was a member of the 11-Deuce Hoovers criminal street gang, based upon defendant’s admission to Kill Kill, his documented contacts with law enforcement, and defendant’s gang-related tattoos. Detective White also testified regarding gang culture, giving his opinion that the Hoover Criminals gang and its sets were criminal street gangs, whose members’ primary activities included murder, attempted murder, assault, narcotics sales, weapons violations, robbery, and graffiti-related vandalism. He presented certified records of several Hoover gang members convicted of such crimes. Given hypothetical facts based upon the evidence in this case, Detective White opined that the shooting of the victims in this case was committed for the benefit of the Hoover Criminals gang.
Defense evidence
The defense recalled Detective Ramirez, who testified that during an interview Zamora said that defendant had been seated in the back seat when they discussed the shooting. At trial, Detective Ramirez testified that Zamora said he had been in the front passenger seat.
Iris Garcia (Garcia) testified she lived in a second floor apartment on 107th Street and was awake when the shooting took place. She heard gunshots, looked into the street, saw a dark blue car with the front and rear windows open on the driver’s side, and saw gunfire flashes emanating from the windows. She thought the car was a Mercedes Benz. After she saw a young man fall, the blue car left toward Normandie Avenue. Garcia gave this information to a deputy sheriff on the scene that night and spoke to Detective Ramirez by telephone in March 2010. Although there was a tree between her apartment and the location of the shooting, Garcia denied that it blocked her view. She explained that some branches had been removed from the tree.
Deputy Roberto Reyes took Garcia’s initial report. He testified Garcia told him she heard a gunshot, looked out her window, saw someone, and then she heard and saw four or five more shots coming from a newer model dark blue Mercedes with tinted windows. She told him she saw the driver and a front passenger, both Black males, and after the gunfire stopped, the car sped away eastbound.
Defendant’s cousins Myiesha Hall (Hall) and Latrice Wilson (Wilson) testified that in February 2009, they lived in the same apartment complex in San Bernardino, and that defendant lived with Hall during all or part of February until after the first of March. Both cousins testified that on February 28, 2009, during the time that defendant was staying with Hall, Wilson gave a “smoke out” party that lasted from 8:00 p.m. until about 2:00 a.m. The two women remembered the date because Hall kept a calendar of events and wrote “smoke out” on that date. Hall testified that she, defendant, Wilson, Renee Hall, Tricia Lewis, and David Atkins attended the party.
Hall was “100 percent certain” that defendant came to stay with her two weeks before the end of February and she remembered he left at the beginning of March, on the day of a memorial for her young cousin who had died in 2008. Hall’s ex-boyfriend, Gregory Haynes, drove defendant from Los Angeles. Hall acknowledged that she told the defense investigator in February 2011, that the memorial had taken place in Carson on March 23, 2009. Hall denied knowing or telling the investigator that defendant was known as Tiny Snaps or Baby Snaps, or saying, “Let’s just leave that part out” when the investigator asked how many years defendant had used the name. Hall admitted she was acquainted with Tiny Box and Bam Bam, both members of the 107th Street Hoover Crips.
Wilson also testified that defendant came to stay with Hall about two weeks before the smoke out party and left during the first week of March. Wilson claimed she did not know that defendant was a gang member, and did not learn that he had been accused of murder until the defense investigator told her on February 8, 2011. Wilson explained she did not contact law enforcement because she gave her information to the defense investigator and there was nothing more she could do.
John Doe, the informant known as Kill Kill, testified he did not know Sergeant Marbach or Detective Ramirez, never worked as an informant, and had no information about this case. He claimed to have little memory of his conversation with defendant and denied knowing it had been recorded.
Ross also denied being an informant in this case. He admitted he was a member of the 107th Hoover gang, but denied knowing defendant in 2009. Ross remembered that while he was in jail, homicide detectives interviewed him and showed him an obituary photograph. The detectives suggested that Ross had murdered the man in the picture, and then placed Ross in handcuffs next to defendant. Ross denied trying to elicit information

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Re: who started hoover crip? 107 HCG?

Unread post by bgcasper » March 11th, 2017, 2:25 am

i meant acording to the article all hoovers together are 900 deep
here another case were they discribe selo hood as starting in 102 and budlong ..u had an interview of budlongs sayin they had to constantly push hoovers back from their hood

here yall go
Defendant is a Hoover Crips gang member known as Squeak. Sometime between 4:00 and 6:00 p.m. on March 18, 2007, he and two or three other black men approached 17-year-old Jose Solis and his 18-year-old cousin, Rosendo Solis, near the intersection of 105th Street and Budlong Avenue in Lennox, an unincorporated area of Los Angeles County. The Solises are not gang members.



One of the men Jose did not notice which -- said, What do you have? and Where are you from? Defendant displayed a gun under his sweater. Rosendo heard defendant say Give us the money, or Ill shoot. The men tried to reach in the Solises pockets, but the Solises pushed their hands away. Defendants accomplices said, Shoot him. Defendant backed away from Jose and fired. The bullet struck Jose in the right thigh. Defendant and the others ran away.



Kevin Lowery, also a member of the Hoover Crips and a key witness to the murder of Damont Johnson, discussed below, witnessed the shooting of Jose Solis. He testified that two or three weeks before the Johnson killing, as he was coming up Budlong, he saw defendant trying to rob a Mexican guy who was with another person at 105th Street. When the victim didnt give him anything, defendant shot him, once.



Both Jose and Rosendo testified that the shooter had a teardrop tattoo below his right eye. Defendant has such a tattoo.



Jose identified defendant as the shooter in a pretrial photographic lineup on April 10, 2007, and later at a live lineup. At trial, Jose was permitted (at his request) to step down from the witness stand to examine defendant closely, including defendants teardrop tattoo. After doing so, Jose positively identified defendant as the shooter.



Rosendo identified defendant at trial. In a pretrial photographic lineup, he did not make an identification. At a live lineup, Rosendo identified defendant, writing: Hes the suspect. Also for the teardrop thats tattooed underneath the eyes. At the lineup, Rosendo recognized defendants face as well as his tattoo.



B. Murder of Damont Johnson



On April 9, 2007, around midnight, Kevin Lowery and defendant were riding on bicycles down Budlong Avenue toward 102nd Street.[2] On the way, they passed Joes Market on Budlong. At 102nd Street they came upon a man, later identified as Damont Johnson, in a truck. Johnson got out of the drivers side of the truck and began arguing with defendant. Johnson said he was from the Playboy Gangster Crips, which is a rival gang of the Hoover Crips, and asked defendant Where you from? Defendant replied, Hoover. Johnson said, Fuck Snoovers, using a derogatory term to refer to the Hoover Crips. Defendant then pulled out a gun and shot him three times. Lowery saw Johnsons face appear to crumple, and he fell to the ground. Lowery took off on his bicycle towards 106th Street.



Defendant caught up with him near Joes Market, and fired four or five times at a truck that they thought was following them. The gun jammed. Defendant gave the gun to Lowery, who unsuccessfully tried to clear the jam and gave it back to defendant. Defendant hid the gun behind a trash dumpster at the apartment where his girlfriend Teca lived.



On the morning of the shooting, Sonia Harmon was at her mothers house at 102nd and Budlong when she heard Damont Johnson, whom she knew from the neighborhood, arguing with two guys in the street where he had just parked his vehicle. She then heard three or four gunshots. She looked out a bedroom window and saw a Hispanic male (Lowery is half Hispanic and very light skinned) and a black male. The male Hispanic was riding his bicycle away real fast. The male black was holding a gun, and was bent over Johnsons body, going through the pockets.[3] He took something out of a pocket (she believed it was money), and then rode away on his bicycle real slow . . . like he wasnt trying to get away. He didnt care who saw him. Harmon then heard two more shots, but did not see who fired.[4]



Los Angeles County Sheriffs Detective Steven Katz, who responded to the scene, observed Johnsons body in the street next to his SUV. Clenched in Johnsons left fist was cash. An autopsy later revealed that Johnson had been shot three times: once in the face, once in the top of the head, and once in the rear left shoulder penetrating the neck. Each shot was independently fatal.



Later that morning, after the killing, Lowery was walking down 106th Street toward Budlong when he was stopped by a Sheriffs deputy. While he was seated in a patrol car, Los Angeles County Sheriffs Detective Joseph Garrido spoke to him. While Lowery was still in the patrol car, his aunt urged him to tell the truth and say who was involved. Lowery then told Detective Garrido that he was not the shooter, but that he knew who was Squeak from the 107th Street Hoover Crips. He also directed Detective Garrido to the gun used by defendant, hidden behind the trash dumpster. At the Lennox Sheriffs station after his arrest, Lowery identified defendants photograph in a photo six-pack.



Using Lowerys information, Detectives Garrido and Katz discovered the gun, a .380 caliber semiautomatic pistol, wedged against a fence pole and the chain link fence behind a dumpster on Budlong. An expended shell casing was jammed inside the ejection port.



At the murder scene, Detective Katz found four spent .380 caliber shell casings, one under Johnsons body and the others in the immediate area. A ballistics comparison showed that two of the casings, including the one found under Johnsons body, came from the gun found by Detectives Garrido and Katz. Two others could have come from the gun, but the comparison was inconclusive. Similarly, projectiles removed from Johnsons body during the autopsy, and two .380 shell casings discovered by Detective Katz just north of Joes Market on Budlong, could have come from the gun, but the comparisons were not conclusive.



The next day, Lowery was interviewed by Sheriffs Detectives Steven Katz and Traci Gonzales. According to Lowerys trial testimony, he was truthful with the detectives, but still did not describe all the details of the shooting. In particular, he did not fully disclose his actions during and after the shooting. Then the detectives told him (untruthfully) that they had found gunshot residue on his hands and the victims blood on his shirt. They also showed him a video from a surveillance camera at Joes Market (the video was played the jury), located three blocks from the murder scene. In the video, Damont Johnsons vehicle passes by, followed shortly by two people on bicycles. After a brief period, the two bicyclists ride past in the opposite direction. A vehicle then appears as if in pursuit of the bicyclists. One of the bicyclists extends his arm, and flashes emanate from the extended hand consistent with muzzle flashes from a firearm. The vehicle comes to a stop, backs up quickly, and disappears from view.



The video was not of sufficient quality to permit identification of the bicyclists. But Lowery recognized himself and defendant. After that, he told Detectives Katz and Gonzales everything he knew about the shooting.



Defendant was in custody in San Bernardino when an arrest warrant issued for him on April 19, 2007. Defendant had been living in San Bernardino at the apartment of his aunt, Tiffany Donson. During a search of that apartment, Donson directed Detective Katz to defendants belongings. He seized a jacket and pair of pants.



Defendant was transported to Los Angeles, and while in custody there his telephone conversations and conversations with cellmates were monitored and recorded. The prosecution transcribed three brief telephone conversations defendant had with his aunt, Tiffany Donson, on April 19 after his arrest. A CD of those conversations was played for the jury. In these conversations, Donson complained that the police had searched her apartment in connection with a killing defendant committed. When defendant professed not to know what she was talking about, Donson accused him of lying. Defendant replied, We on the phone talking Tiff, for one, and then said, I aint did nothing. Later, Donson said that she pray[ed] to God you didnt kill nobody. Defendant replied, Theres been a lot of shit going down man. Thats what Im saying. Theres been a lot of shit. When Donson referred to having given police defendants coat, defendant told her: You aint supposed to give them shit though Tiff, regardless. They aint got no warrant for no mother fuckin. Donson cut him off by saying that they did have a warrant.



Detective Katz testified to particular incriminating statements defendant made in other monitored telephone conversations with Donson. During one conversation, defendant asked, How am I going to prove I wasnt there? He referred to doing dumb shit, and said I just fucked up, I fucked up this time.



Detective Katz also testified to statements defendant made to a cell mate (other portions were not discernable).[5] At one point, defendant said Solo [Lowerys nickname] telling on me, bird. They got me for they got one hot one. Dude was speaking up on some other ones. That Mexican nigga on the set for murder, my nigga. At another point, defendant referred to spitting on Lowery on the bus. In still another portion, he referred to the murder victim by name, Damont Johnson, and said that the nigga from Playboy got hit three times in the head. He added at another point that Goo was at his truck, and then made three popping noises. He referred to handling a gun and the gun getting jammed. Defendant also mentioned his mother trying to create an alibi by saying that he was with her the entire day.



Los Angeles Sheriffs Detective Louie Aguilera testified as a gang expert. Defendant was an admitted member of the Hoover Crips. He had an H tattoo under his left eye, signifying the Hoover Crips, and a teardrop tattoo under his right eye, signifying having been incarcerated.[6] He also had the number 7 on one shoulder and an H on the other, signifying the 107th Street Hoover Crips. He had a SELO tattoo on his chest, a nickname for the 107th Street Crips.



According to Detective Aguilera, the Hoover Crips refer to themselves as Groovers, and when referring to committing a crime against a rival gang member they say that they are going to groove someone. Snoover is a derogatory term for the Hoover Crips. Using the words Fuck Snoovers to a member of the Hoover Crips would likely result in an altercation.



The Hoover Crips controlled the area of the murder 102nd Street and Budlong. The Detective opined that the murder was committed for the benefit of the Hoover Crips, in that it asserted their control over their territory. He likewise opined that the Solis crimes were committed for the benefit of the Hoover Crips.



II. Defense



Defendant testified that he knew Lowery because they belonged to the same gang. He denied that he was with Lowery at the time of the shooting.[7] He also denied being at the location of the Solis shooting.



When arrested for the murder of Damont Johnson, defendant was already in custody in San Bernardino for committing a burglary in the apartment complex where his aunt Tiffany Donson lived. When the Los Angeles County Sheriffs detectives interviewed him in San Bernardino, they said that someone had said that he committed a murder, but they did not tell defendant when or where the crime occurred or the identity of the person who said he was involved. Defendant did not know what they were talking about.



After he received his paperwork at his arraignment, he learned the details of the murder. In his recorded comments to Tiffany Donson and his comments to his cellmate, he was discussing either the burglary he committed at Donsons apartment complex that caused her to move from the location (I just . . . fucked up this time) or the paperwork he received on the murder. He also discussed his paperwork with others in jail, trying to find out what happened. Also, when referring to robbing people when speaking with his cellmate, he was referring to old robberies he committed, not the present charges.



The defense also presented the following evidence: (1) testimony from Detectives Katz and Aguilera concerning Lowerys dishonesty in his initial statements to the police concerning his conduct before and after the killing; (2) testimony by Los Angeles County Sheriffs Deputy David Payne that the suspects in the Solis crimes were described as being one teenage female and two teenage males, all 5 feet, 4 inches tall, the males weighting 150 pounds descriptions inconsistent with defendant who fled into a house on the same block of Budlong where Lowery lived; and (3) a stipulation that while a DNA profile could not be obtained from the stain on Lowerys shirt, stains on defendants clothing matched his profile and excluded Damont Johnson as a donor.


plus some online video about selo patrolin thru underground and posting in a house in their hood https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2it9tlWTquI

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Re: who started hoover crip? 107 HCG?

Unread post by bgcasper » March 11th, 2017, 2:27 am

but again i dont know shit plus dont know any hoover all i can give yall is online shit so nothing first hand ...but from what i saw online seems 107 in better shape than 112

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Re: who started hoover crip? 107 HCG?

Unread post by ViciousRidah » March 11th, 2017, 5:57 pm

bgcasper wrote:but again i dont know shit plus dont know any hoover all i can give yall is online shit so nothing first hand ...but from what i saw online seems 107 in better shape than 112
The thing is the story online is from 10 years ago. much has changed since then.

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Re: who started hoover crip? 107 HCG?

Unread post by xxx » March 11th, 2017, 8:28 pm

alexalonso wrote:
xxx wrote:112H lost their Land.

They function in 107 Hood.

So they are a nomad gang like 1st ECC.

The members are still alive, they just dont have no home.

This is starting to be the norm across Los Angeles County.

Major of Gang members live outside their Neighborhood.
Demographics has made most gang members weekend warriors.

But 11-2 is defunct as far as having territory. They dont even come visit on weekends.
107 is kind of the same way, they used to have 104th & Budlong. I spoke to OG Devil and he told me they used to kick it on 104th & Budlong, and there is no Hoover activity at all over there anymore.
at their height,
-107s had Century to 110th Street, Normandie to Vermont &
-Century to 104th Street, Vermont to Hoover Street.
-Century & Hoover Street at the Car Wash was one of their Hang Outs.
-107th Street & Budlong was their ground Zero.
-Buddha, Blackie and Monkey Man were the OG-WSC that lived on that side.
-Monkey Man started U/G on that Side in (1973).
-The Moo Moo from U/G turned 92 Hoover and started 107 Hoovers on Budlong in (1975).
-Real Good History in that ARea.

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Re: who started hoover crip? 107 HCG?

Unread post by xxx » March 11th, 2017, 8:31 pm

bgcasper wrote:golden i know its supposed h94ver but them apartment had few hits up that say hcm and zero 18 st so i was wonderin on vatos side who been owning golden apartments ? and there was a watts 13 hit up unwacced
Colden.

youve been saying Golden for over 10yrs now.

Thats was one of the gives aways back then, when you kept calling Colden, Golden.

Colden is/was a Hoover Stronghold, a Base, ground zero for 92 Hoovers.

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Re: who started hoover crip? 107 HCG?

Unread post by alexalonso » March 12th, 2017, 2:56 am

107 Hoovers may have started in 1976. I been talking to some of their OGs lately.

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Re: who started hoover crip? 107 HCG?

Unread post by bgcasper » March 12th, 2017, 4:45 am

[quote="xxx"][quote="bgcasper"]golden i know its supposed h94ver but them apartment had few hits up that say hcm and zero 18 st so i was wonderin on vatos side who been owning golden apartments ? and there was a watts 13 hit up unwacced[/quote]

Colden.

youve been saying Golden for over 10yrs now.

Thats was one of the gives aways back then, when you kept calling Colden, Golden.

Colden is/was a Hoover Stronghold, a Base, ground zero for 92 Hoovers.[/quote]ok .thanks for the info ..i remember reading about 94 more on broadway specially recently since main street beef that side became their front.so it makes sense that golden a 92 stronghold theres a gang of apartments there ..but anyway . i say golden because i dont know hoovers ?i mean when u dont know shit u call street by their name and off course it obvious ...so how they call that area ???

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Re: who started hoover crip? 107 HCG?

Unread post by bgcasper » March 12th, 2017, 4:48 am

[quote="ViciousRidah"][quote="bgcasper"]but again i dont know shit plus dont know any hoover all i can give yall is online shit so nothing first hand ...but from what i saw online seems 107 in better shape than 112[/quote]
The thing is the story online is from 10 years ago. much has changed since then.[/quote]
oh ok like i said ..i dont know shit about hoover i mostly post what i read ...so its official 107 dont have even a blocc there ?

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Re: who started hoover crip? 107 HCG?

Unread post by bgcasper » March 12th, 2017, 4:56 am

[quote="xxx"][quote="alexalonso"][quote="xxx"]112H lost their Land.

They function in 107 Hood.

So they are a nomad gang like 1st ECC.

The members are still alive, they just dont have no home.

This is starting to be the norm across Los Angeles County.

Major of Gang members live outside their Neighborhood.
Demographics has made most gang members weekend warriors.

But 11-2 is defunct as far as having territory. They dont even come visit on weekends.[/quote]

107 is kind of the same way, they used to have 104th & Budlong. I spoke to OG Devil and he told me they used to kick it on 104th & Budlong, and there is no Hoover activity at all over there anymore.[/quote]

at their height,
-107s had Century to 110th Street, Normandie to Vermont &
-Century to 104th Street, Vermont to Hoover Street.
-Century & Hoover Street at the Car Wash was one of their Hang Outs.
-107th Street & Budlong was their ground Zero.
-Buddha, Blackie and Monkey Man were the OG-WSC that lived on that side.
-Monkey Man started U/G on that Side in (1973).
-The Moo Mo


og hawk interview was a classic ...the moment when fresh out he just went to visit his girlfriend and ended in an enemi hood ...just before that he was partying with them ...durin his interview he said them selo intended to cross ver to take over hoover street from denver lane i gues ??actually if u look at old map they did own hoover street at one point ..you know when ?? and when they lost it to who ?i guess denva ...

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Re: who started hoover crip? 107 HCG?

Unread post by bgcasper » March 13th, 2017, 11:14 am

cuzzz i dont know who started hoover but i got a clue on whos gonna end it
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R8XgDZPpFUs that type of shit get u a bullet in your head were im from dont know about yall...

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Re: who started hoover crip? 107 HCG?

Unread post by Troublehoov » March 13th, 2017, 5:01 pm

Hoover Joe started Hoover crip 74 Hoover was the first Hoover set and he was the founding father along with Robert battle,Kalvin woods,none,blacc pup,Leo (tips) just to name a few... 83 Hoover was started by big bamm along with big smiley,Leon Washington aka Lil bamm,hoover rob,mad hoover,hoover Al,ed quarrels,mumbles,Paul Ellis,Joe moe,June bug,queek,bulldog,sugar bear. 92 was started by Melvin bloodstone Calloway... 107 was started by Frank Jones aka moo moo along with dirty red,Andre ransom,Darryl ransom... 112 Ricky fields aka big foots, duck,batt,bootsy,boobie,hoover macc,jap,big zag,bobcat,qball,lobo,Andre bam.94 Hoover big m.m. along with big Donny boy,big hawk,big jaboe,big Capone,big Casper,big crazy,big sherlocc,big preacher,big redd,big wood,big dee Dogg....43 juda bean along with ,none, big Joe,Houdini,disco...52 boo Capone, big Ken dogg,big coco,big Dre dogg,big wildflower,big coke Dogg,gangster tee,tee Capone,big crazy dee dee,big red Jr,big spooky,big joker,tony Lee,big insane fish,big ricc rocc,big devil... 59 big Sims along with big straw Dogg,big fly,big blacc,big devil,big rat,big c dogg... Hoover was never apart of a gang calked the Hoover groovers they were their own gang we linked them off brands...

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Re: who started hoover crip? 107 HCG?

Unread post by alexalonso » March 14th, 2017, 12:10 am

Troublehoov wrote:Hoover Joe started Hoover crip 74 Hoover was the first Hoover set and he was the founding father along with Robert battle,Kalvin woods,none,blacc pup,Leo (tips) just to name a few... 83 Hoover was started by big bamm along with big smiley,Leon Washington aka Lil bamm,hoover rob,mad hoover,hoover Al,ed quarrels,mumbles,Paul Ellis,Joe moe,June bug,queek,bulldog,sugar bear. 92 was started by Melvin bloodstone Calloway... 107 was started by Frank Jones aka moo moo along with dirty red,Andre ransom,Darryl ransom... 112 Ricky fields aka big foots, duck,batt,bootsy,boobie,hoover macc,jap,big zag,bobcat,qball,lobo,Andre bam.94 Hoover big m.m. along with big Donny boy,big hawk,big jaboe,big Capone,big Casper,big crazy,big sherlocc,big preacher,big redd,big wood,big dee Dogg....43 juda bean along with ,none, big Joe,Houdini,disco...52 boo Capone, big Ken dogg,big coco,big Dre dogg,big wildflower,big coke Dogg,gangster tee,tee Capone,big crazy dee dee,big red Jr,big spooky,big joker,tony Lee,big insane fish,big ricc rocc,big devil... 59 big Sims along with big straw Dogg,big fly,big blacc,big devil,big rat,big c dogg... Hoover was never apart of a gang calked the Hoover groovers they were their own gang we linked them off brands...
I am certain that 92 Hoover was first, then 74. In the early 1970s, the Hoovers often went by Hoover Groovers, this is before there was 92, 74 or 83. From 1970 this was a well known name of the Hoovers.

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Re: who started hoover crip? 107 HCG?

Unread post by Troublehoov » March 26th, 2017, 5:18 am

I know for a fact 92 didn't start first because the 92 Hoover's started 107 Hoover that would make 107 second to start witch is not true. 52 Hoover was started in the beginning to we just wasn't considered Hoovers at first because we wasn't founded under their foundation. 52 Hoover was in 1975 but didn't get recognized till the 80s that's why y'all always get a date in the 80s... Like I said I talk to all the originals

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Re: who started hoover crip? 107 HCG?

Unread post by jae » March 30th, 2017, 8:49 pm

Is it true that the 5-2's were originally "52nd Street Gangsters" before they turned Hoovers?

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Re: who started hoover crip? 107 HCG?

Unread post by Troublehoov » March 31st, 2017, 10:40 pm

Y'all can text me so we can chop it up 2133612895

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Re: who started hoover crip? 107 HCG?

Unread post by bgcasper » July 18th, 2017, 10:01 pm

i think all your answers are there https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n3nDvtc2jyA&t=281s

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Re: who started hoover crip? 107 HCG?

Unread post by ViciousRidah » August 11th, 2017, 2:01 am

xxx wrote:112H lost their Land.

They function in 107 Hood.

So they are a nomad gang like 1st ECC.

The members are still alive, they just dont have no home.

This is starting to be the norm across Los Angeles County.

Major of Gang members live outside their Neighborhood.
Demographics has made most gang members weekend warriors.

But 11-2 is defunct as far as having territory. They dont even come visit on weekends.
This is why I gotta question how much about gangs you know when you supposed to be from 60s and giving your enemies credit for having a turf they no longer have.

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