Gang Members That Were State Executed

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Gang Members That Were State Executed

Unread post by Common Sense » August 18th, 2006, 8:39 pm

Walanzo Deon Robinson
Executed March 18, 2003 by Lethal Injection in Oklahoma

Summary:
Robinson was a member of the Van-Ness Gangster Bloods, a violent street gang active in the crack cocaine trade. He had been staying with friends in Oklahoma City. After an argument over drug sales and turf on a streetcorner, Hill was shot in the back as he ran by Robinson with a .38 handgun. Robinson then followed the wounded Hill and fired two more bullets into him as he lay in the street. Robinson then fled the state, but was arrested in Los Angeles four months later.
http://www.clarkprosecutor.org/html/dea ... son838.htm


Convicted Killer Williams Put To Death In Calif.

Former gang member's appeals, requests for clemency fail
Stanley Tookie Williams was executed at San Quentin State prison early Tuesday morning.

Dec 13, 2005
SAN FRANCISCO - Convicted killer Stanley Tookie Williams, the Crips gang co-founder whose case stirred a national debate about capital punishment versus the possibility of redemption, was executed Tuesday morning.

Williams, 51, died at 12:35 a.m. after receiving a lethal injection at San Quentin State Prison, officials said. Before the execution, he was "complacent, quiet and thoughtful," Corrections Department spokeswoman Terry Thornton said.

The case became the state's highest-profile execution in decades. Hollywood stars and capital punishment foes argued that Williams' sentence should be commuted to life in prison because he had made amends by writing children's books about the dangers of gangs and violence.

In the days leading up to the execution, state and federal courts refused to reopen his case. Monday, Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger denied Williams' request for clemency, suggesting that his supposed change of heart was not genuine because he had not shown any real remorse for the countless killings committed by the Crips.

"Is Williams' redemption complete and sincere, or is it just a hollow promise?" Schwarzenegger wrote. "Without an apology and atonement for these senseless and brutal killings, there can be no redemption."

Trouble finding vein
At the execution, the people administering the injections had trouble finding a vein in Williams' left arm for the injection. It took about 12 minutes for them to put in the line, said one reporter.

At one point, according to a reporter who witnessed the execution, it looked like Williams said to the guards in frustration, “Still can’t find it?” Then he leaned back down, said the reporter. "He was trying to help them find a vein that would work for them," said said Steve Ornoski, the prison warden.

When he walked into the room, "all he would do is look at his supporters, then he made dramatic turn and looked at all of [the media]," said MSNBC's Rita Cosby, who saw Williams put to death.

Williams' supporters stood at the back of the room and gave what looked like black power salutes several times, said the reporters. After he was declared dead, the supporters left and yelled in unison, "The state of California just killed an innocent man," said the reporters.

He declined to give last words at the execution, and instead passed on a statement to be read by longtime friend Barbara Becnel after his death.
In the days leading up to his execution, Williams' supporters and opponents appeared to be more occupied with his fate than he was.

“Me fearing what I’m facing, what possible good is it going to do for me? How is that going to benefit me?” Williams said in a recent interview. “If it’s my time to be executed, what’s all the ranting and raving going to do?”
Condemned for 1981 killings
Williams was condemned in 1981 for gunning down convenience store clerk Albert Owens, 26, at a 7-Eleven in Whittier and killing Yen-I Yang, 76, Tsai-Shai Chen Yang, 63, and the couple's daughter Yu-Chin Yang Lin, 43, at the Los Angeles motel they owned. Williams claimed he was innocent.
Witnesses at the trial said Williams boasted about the killings, stating "You should have heard the way he sounded when I shot him." Williams then made a growling noise and laughed for five to six minutes, according to the transcript that the governor referenced in his denial of clemency.
Williams was the 12th person executed in California since lawmakers reinstated the death penalty in 1977.
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/10355657



Texas Executes Gang Member Who Raped, Killed Two Teenage Girls

07-12-2006,
HUNTSVILLE, United States (AFP)
The state of Texas executed a gang member who confessed to raping and killing two teenage girls.

Sean Derrick O'Brien was 19 when he and five other gang members attacked two girls who had taken a shortcut home through a park on June 24, 1993.

Elizabeth Pena, 16, and Jennifer Ertman, 15, were raped repeatedly by the gang members and then strangled to death, according to documents provided by the Texas Department of Criminal Justice.
O'Brien confessed to strangling Ertman with a belt after she was assaulted. Two of the four other gang members also received the death penalty but O'Brien is the first to be executed.

O'Brien was apologetic in his last statement.
"I am sorry. I have always been sorry. It is the worst mistake that I ever made in my whole life," O'Brien told a group of witnesses that included the parents of the two girls, an AFP reporter observed.
"Not because I am here, but because of what I did and I hurt a lot of people - you and my family."
His girlfriend laid her head down on the glass and sobbed as they said goodbye.
The father of one of the victims said that while he could never feel closure, he was glad that he was instrumental in having the rules changed so that the family of victims could witness executions.
"It meant a lot to me that I could sit there and watch that scumbag die...
You don't know what it feels like to have some justice," Adolfo Pena told reporters.
"You guys know what she went through. These kids deserve to die. There's no excuse for what they did."
O'Brien was executed by lethal injection and pronounced dead at 6:19 pm (2319 GMT).

He was the 25th person executed in the United States this year and the 1,030th since the death penalty was reinstated in 1982, according to the Death Penalty Information Center.
There were 3,370 people on death row in the United States as of April 1, according to the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, Inchttp://www.turkishpress.com/news.asp?id=133161



Texas Executes Gang Member Who Killed Man For His Wallet, Car
07-20-2006,
HUNTSVILLE, United States (AFP)

The state of Texas executed a gang member convicted of killing a man for his wallet and car keys during a 1996 car jacking in San Antonio. Mauriceo Brown, 31, was executed by lethal injection and pronounced dead at 6:47 pm (2347 GMT),

The state of Texas executed a gang member convicted of killing a man for his wallet and car keys during a 1996 car jacking in San Antonio.
Mauriceo Brown, 31, was executed by lethal injection and pronounced dead at 6:47 pm (2347 GMT), AFP witnessed.
His mother had to be physically supported as she entered the witness room sobbing and telling Brown that she loved him and crying "don't do this."
As he was gasping his final breaths, Cynthia Luckey told her son, "God loves you. God loves you. God loves you," and then fell against the window and collapsed to the floor when she realized he was dead.
"Why didn't they give him another chance. He was not guilty," she said as her two other children escorted her from the room. "They kill him and they talk about justice."
The family of the victim also witnessed his execution and expressed sympathy for Brown's family to the media.
"I don't regret coming up here or think it shouldn't have happened but I don't think a parent ever gets over losing a child," brother Nico Lahood said.
"I'm thinking of it in relation to our suffering... it wasn't their doing."
Three other gang members participated in the robbery which left Michael Lahood, 25, dead beside his car.
When asked if he was looking forward to the execution of a second killer, Lahood's brother said that would not be the best way to describe his feelings.
"I don't know if you look forward to something like this. I'm going to feel for his family too."
Brown was the 28th person executed in the United States this year and the 1,031th since the death penalty was reinstated in 1976, according to the Death Penalty Information Center.
There were 3,370 people on death row in the United States as of April 1, according to the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, Inc.
http://archive.turkishpress.com/news.asp?id=134232

Another article regarding Mr. Mauriceo Brown, 31
The early morning attack capped a spree by the street gang members who called themselves the Hoover 94 Crips. At least four other people were robbed that night.
http://feeds.thedallasnews.net/?rid=8e2 ... 1d1f7d&f=1

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Unread post by YoungHustla » September 6th, 2006, 1:49 pm

Damn christina, i kno that nigga, he stayed in Bexar county

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Unread post by YoungHustla » September 6th, 2006, 1:50 pm

Referring to M. Dot aka Mariceo. He is from the Crips. (that is a fact)

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Unread post by YoungHustla » September 6th, 2006, 1:52 pm

my fault for triple postin but im trippin right now, i meant COMMON

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Unread post by Common Sense » September 6th, 2006, 4:33 pm

YoungHustla wrote:my fault for triple postin but im trippin right now, i meant COMMON
I read an interview of Mauriceo before he was killed by the State of Texas. It was quite sad.

What was he like? What did you know of him?

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Unread post by Common Sense » September 6th, 2006, 4:40 pm

An interview with Mauriceo Brown
'Caught up in the streets'

Click on all of the links. Some interviews are on video.
http://www.courttv.com/facing_death/mauriceo_brown/

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Unread post by YoungHustla » September 7th, 2006, 4:04 pm

Nah i knew dude personally. He went in way before i did though. The only Crip i knew. But he was F#cked up in the head. he Repped the C hard. Blue socks, blue Everything.

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Unread post by Common Sense » September 8th, 2006, 11:53 am

YoungHustla wrote:he was F#cked up in the head. he Repped the C hard. Blue socks, blue Everything.
He seemed more mature in his prison video, wasn't talking all crazy, seemed more worried about his kid (s) and family. I guess death row will do that to a person.

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Unread post by YoungHustla » September 8th, 2006, 12:34 pm

Yeah, He used to come to Oak Cliff every once and a while. I knew him from a girl i used to talk to from SA. He was the ONLY, I mean the ONLY Crip welcomed on Exeter and Ramona. Its Crips on Other streets surrounding Ramona and Exeter but they Never Roll thru this way. They always take a "Detour" due to the fact that Ramona is Held down Strong. not sayin they scared, i guess thats just the smart thing to do. Sorry if i got off Topic.

and yeah he was Hoover.

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Unread post by Common Sense » September 8th, 2006, 12:44 pm

YoungHustla wrote:He was the ONLY, I mean the ONLY Crip welcomed on Exeter and Ramona. Its Crips on Other streets surrounding Ramona and Exeter, and yeah he was Hoover.
Why was he the only Crip that could stroll or get a pass like that? Was he just cool with everybody on Exter and Romona?

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Unread post by YoungHustla » September 8th, 2006, 1:55 pm

Hell nah. He was cool with me and my brothers. We lived there all of our lives, so we got mad clout there. Not to say "We Run Shit" but we got alotta Old Heads backin us, the ones that was doin they thing in the 60's and 70's, who got the hold HOOD ON LOCK. so as long as he was cool with me he was cool with comin thru. alot of niggas on Exeter Dont like C's. but the way i see it is if u cool u cool, i aint gonna hate on a real nigga. so it was sorta like a "hood pass". come thru exeter anytime and he was good

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Unread post by YoungHustla » September 8th, 2006, 1:56 pm

and to answer your question THE ONLY CRIP i know to come through the hood and kick it. but then again u never know, it could be some C's that kept a low profile

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Unread post by YoungHustla » September 8th, 2006, 2:05 pm

Oh yeah another thing. Things have changed round the way. still the same niggas, but the C's tryna push Boundaries though. When i went on my 6 and a half year vacation :D things changed alittle bit. slowly but surely the tryna crawl thru the cracks, feel me? but as long as niggas stay real Ramona aint never gonna be C'd Out. im just addin that so u would know that Crips are Disregarded in the Hood. so when he came thru i held him down, cuz he couldnt walk the streets of RAMONA without that. that just to be specific. RIP M.DOT

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Unread post by YoungHustla » September 8th, 2006, 2:10 pm

and 1 more thing my nigga, i think the WHOLE C controversy started when a Homeboy of my homeboy knocked out some CRIP nigga in JAIL. and i think they did RIDE on him for that, cuz at the time he was Solo in jail. so he play a big part of the reason crips dont come here cuz i guess to make it a point of blastin on sight. and To be specific, my HOMEBOY'S homeboy is not tied with us, but he plays a major role in Oak Cliif (no names)

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Unread post by Common Sense » August 22nd, 2007, 9:59 pm

Ryan Heath Dickson
Executed: 4/26/2007

Summary:
On 11/27/1994, Dickson and a juvenile accomplice robbed an Amarillo grocery store. The store owners, a 61 year old white male and his 60 year old white wife, were murdered during the robbery. Dickson and his half-brother entered the store and were attempting to steal beer when they were confronted by the male store owner. Dickson produced a sawed-off .22-caliber rifle from underneath his coat and shot the storeowner once in the chest. His wife was then shot in the face even though she had placed all the money from the store register on the counter for the robbers to take. The robbery netted $52 in cash and an undetermined amount of beer.

TEXAS:

Jurors in 47th District Court listened intently Thursday as a prosecutor
and a young girl read a series of jailhouse letters that convicted
capital murder defendant Ryan Heath Dickson wrote while awaiting trial.

A Potter County jury found Dickson guilty of capital murder last week for
the shooting of an Amarillo grocery store owner.

Jurors are now hearing the prosecution's punishment-phase testimony,
which may wrap up today.

Dickson, 21, was tried for the Nov. 27, 1994, shooting death of Carmelo
Surace
. Surace was shot at the Surace Grocery.

The letters were the focus of repeated objections from defense attorney
Gene Fristoe, who said the letters shouldn't be admitted into evidence
because they were extremely prejudicial to his client's case and
contained sexual references that he said were not relevant to the case.

Prosecutor Pat Murphy argued that the letters should be admitted because
they showed Dickson's thoughts and his obsession with gangs.

Judge David Gleason took a brief recess to read the letters before
deciding that prosecutors could admit the letters into evidence.

A young girl took the stand and told jurors that Dickson had sent her the
letters in 1995 and 1996.

Under questioning from prosecutor Pat Murphy, the girl explained gang
terms and symbols scrawled in the margins of the letters
.

The letters included various sayings such as "death to all law dogs" and
"thug life."

Dickson, who referred to himself as Sir Whacko, Sleepy and Original
Gangster, said in the letters that he was a gang member and always would
be.


He also wrote to the girl and claimed he had killed a black person in San
Antonio and a pawn shop clerk in Fort Worth.

The prosecution is seeking the death penalty against Dickson, who was 18
at the time of the shooting. Dickson also is charged in a pending separate
indictment with capital murder for the shooting death of Carmelo Surace's
wife, Marie Surace, at the grocery.

Carmelo Surace was 61, and Marie Surace was 60 when they were killed,
testimony showed.

Dickson was charged with shooting Mr. Surace during the commission of a
robbery or an attempted robbery.

The jury had to find that Dickson intentionally caused Mr. Surace's death
to find him guilty of capital murder.
http://www.tdcj.state.tx.us/stat/dicksonryan.htm

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Unread post by necio » November 1st, 2007, 10:37 am

8)

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Re: Gang Members That Were State Executed

Unread post by Common Sense » September 3rd, 2008, 2:37 pm

Jose Medellin executed for brutal rape, murder of two Houston teens

August 2008

HUNTSVILLE, Texas—A Mexican-born condemned prisoner was executed Tuesday night for the rape and murder of two teenage girls 15 years ago after a divided U.S. Supreme Court rejected his request for a reprieve.

“I’m sorry my actions caused you pain. I hope this brings you the closure that you seek. Never harbor hate,” Jose Medellin said to those gathered to watch him die. Nine minutes later, at 9:57 p.m., he was pronounced dead.

Medellin’s execution, the fifth this year in the nation’s busiest capital punishment state, attracted international attention after he raised claims he wasn’t allowed to consult the Mexican consulate for legal help following his arrest. State officials say he didn’t ask to do so until well after he was convicted of capital murder.

Medellin, 33, was condemned for participating in the 1993 gang rape, beating and strangling of Elizabeth Pena, 16, and Jennifer Ertman, 14. He and five fellow gang members attacked the Houston girls as they were walking home on a June night, raped and tortured them for an hour, then kicked and stomped them before using a belt and shoelaces to strangle them.

Their remains were found four days later. By then, Medellin already had bragged to friends about the killings.

Pena’s father, who was among the witnesses, gently tapped the glass that separated him from Medellin as he turned to leave the witness chamber after the execution.

Medellin’s attorneys contended he was denied the protections of the Vienna Convention, which calls for people arrested to have access to their home country’s consular officials.

The International Court of Justice said Medellin and some 50 other Mexicans on death row around the U.S. should have new hearings in U.S. courts to determine whether the 1963 treaty was violated during their arrests. Medellin was the first among them to die.

President Bush asked states to review the cases, but the U.S. Supreme Court ruled earlier this year neither the president nor the international court can force Texas to wait.

Gov. Rick Perry, Texas courts and the Texas attorney general’s office all said the execution should go forward and that Medellin has had multiple legal reviews. State officials noted Medellin never invoked his consular rights under the Vienna Convention until some four years after he was convicted.

Medellin was 3 when he came to the United States and grew up in Houston, where he learned English and attended school.

His lawyers asked the U.S. Supreme Court on Friday to stop the execution until legislation could be passed to formalize case reviews ordered by the International Court of Justice.

The high court said in its ruling that that possibility was too remote to justify a stay. Justice Stephen Breyer, one of four justices who issued dissenting opinions, wrote that to permit the execution would place the United States “irremediably in violation of international law and breaks our treaty promises.”

Medellin’s supporters said either Congress or the Texas Legislature should have been given a chance to pass a law setting up procedures for new hearings. A bill to implement the international court’s ruling wasn’t introduced in Congress until last month. The Texas Legislature doesn’t meet until January.

On Monday, the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals rejected a request for a reprieve and denied his lawyers permission to file new appeals. The Texas Board of Pardons and Paroles also rejected requests for clemency and a 240-day reprieve.

“I don’t want sympathy or pity, I’d rather have your anger,” Medellin had written on an anti-death penalty Web site where prisoners seek pen pals. “Don’t feel sorry for me. I’m where I’m at because I made an adolescent choice. That’s it!”

One of Medellin’s fellow gang members, Derrick O’Brien, was executed two years ago. Another, Peter Cantu, described as the ringleader of the group, is on death row. He does not have a death date.

Two others, Efrain Perez and Raul Villarreal, had their death sentences commuted to life in prison when the Supreme Court barred executions for those who were 17 at the time of their crimes. The sixth person convicted, Medellin’s brother, Vernancio, was 14 at the time and is serving a 40-year prison term.
http://www.khou.com/topstories/stories/ ... a99c4.html

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Re: Gang Members That Were State Executed

Unread post by shing » January 24th, 2009, 5:38 pm

Former gang member's appeals, requests for clemency fail
Stanley Tookie Williams was executed at San Quentin State prison early Tuesday morning.

Dec 13, 2005
SAN FRANCISCO - Convicted killer Stanley Tookie Williams, the Crips gang co-founder whose case stirred a national debate about capital punishment versus the possibility of redemption, was executed Tuesday morning.

Williams, 51, died at 12:35 a.m. after receiving a lethal injection at San Quentin State Prison, officials said. Before the execution, he was "complacent, quiet and thoughtful," Corrections Department spokeswoman Terry Thornton said.

The case became the state's highest-profile execution in decades. Hollywood stars and capital punishment foes argued that Williams' sentence should be commuted to life in prison because he had made amends by writing children's books about the dangers of gangs and violence.

In the days leading up to the execution, state and federal courts refused to reopen his case. Monday, Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger denied Williams' request for clemency, suggesting that his supposed change of heart was not genuine because he had not shown any real remorse for the countless killings committed by the Crips.

"Is Williams' redemption complete and sincere, or is it just a hollow promise?" Schwarzenegger wrote. "Without an apology and atonement for these senseless and brutal killings, there can be no redemption."

Trouble finding vein
At the execution, the people administering the injections had trouble finding a vein in Williams' left arm for the injection. It took about 12 minutes for them to put in the line, said one reporter.

At one point, according to a reporter who witnessed the execution, it looked like Williams said to the guards in frustration, “Still can’t find it?” Then he leaned back down, said the reporter. "He was trying to help them find a vein that would work for them," said said Steve Ornoski, the prison warden.

When he walked into the room, "all he would do is look at his supporters, then he made dramatic turn and looked at all of [the media]," said MSNBC's Rita Cosby, who saw Williams put to death.

Williams' supporters stood at the back of the room and gave what looked like black power salutes several times, said the reporters. After he was declared dead, the supporters left and yelled in unison, "The state of California just killed an innocent man," said the reporters.

He declined to give last words at the execution, and instead passed on a statement to be read by longtime friend Barbara Becnel after his death.
In the days leading up to his execution, Williams' supporters and opponents appeared to be more occupied with his fate than he was.

“Me fearing what I’m facing, what possible good is it going to do for me? How is that going to benefit me?” Williams said in a recent interview. “If it’s my time to be executed, what’s all the ranting and raving going to do?”
Condemned for 1981 killings
Williams was condemned in 1981 for gunning down convenience store clerk Albert Owens, 26, at a 7-Eleven in Whittier and killing Yen-I Yang, 76, Tsai-Shai Chen Yang, 63, and the couple's daughter Yu-Chin Yang Lin, 43, at the Los Angeles motel they owned. Williams claimed he was innocent.
Witnesses at the trial said Williams boasted about the killings, stating "You should have heard the way he sounded when I shot him." Williams then made a growling noise and laughed for five to six minutes, according to the transcript that the governor referenced in his denial of clemency.
Williams was the 12th person executed in California since lawmakers reinstated the death penalty in 1977.
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/10355657



i lol'ed at that quote

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