Inside the Crips : Life Inside L.A.'s.... by Colton Simpson

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Inside the Crips : Life Inside L.A.'s.... by Colton Simpson

Unread post by willihen » August 11th, 2005, 9:38 pm

order book: http://www.streetgangs.com/books/inside_the_crips

I guess you guys have heard ofthis book about the rollin 30s.

I've Read all the "older books" - "Uprising," "Do or Die," "Monster,"

and read Terrell Wright's "Home of the Body Bags" now I'll check this one out.

Anybody read it? I'm anxious to see how it compares.


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Anonymous20

Unread post by Anonymous20 » August 12th, 2005, 6:50 pm

i have net read it yet, but may include it on the book club read list.

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Unread post by willihen » August 18th, 2005, 10:03 pm

I just finished this book. It was alot better than I thought it was gonna be.

It took the same form set out by Monster's book. It takes you from his beginnings, rising through the ranks in Harlem 30s. Also he did alot of time and spends half the book talking about prisons he was in. From
camp to county, Chino, Soledad, Folsom, some others. He did time and was busted back. like that.

I liked this book because it was well structured and organized and detailed. Account of his jail time was more detailed than his streetlife.

Though it takes place around the same time as Monster was coming up, Cee Loc's book (released 12 years after Monster) is written in a more modern way. Better structured, detailed, more professional. Well worth the money. Cee Loc took what Monster did and capitalized.

Colton Simpson "Lil Cee Loc" banged and was in prison the same time of Monster. In fact they crossed paths many times.

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Unread post by willihen » August 18th, 2005, 10:12 pm

My recommendation for those that haven't read any of the books on (black gangstars) is read Monster first. This sets the stage and is a classic.

Read Terrell Wrights book. No fluff, no political messages, no nothin but raw account of him coming up in the rollin 20s. Awesome book! Non stop action. this is a quicker read and "cuts to the chase" just showing banging.

Cee Locs Next. Good read well structured, takes what monster did and adds to it by way of a Harlem rollin 30 rather than ETG. Also he doesn't get too bogged down in all that theoretical prison dogma of ideologies.

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Unread post by fullblast » August 20th, 2005, 2:47 pm

i read monster, then i read home of the body bags... now i gotta read this.

thanks for the info man, i'm gonna check it out.

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LA Times review of "Inside the Crips" by Colton Si

Unread post by 77th resident » August 30th, 2005, 10:35 am

Inside the Crips Life Inside L.A.'s Most Notorious Gang Colton Simpson with Ann Pearlman St. Martin's: 324 pp., $24.95
By Celeste Fremon
Celeste Fremon is the author of "G-Dog and the Homeboys" and a criminal justice fellow at USC Annenberg's Institute for Justice and Journalism.

August 28, 2005

THE crime rate in Los Angeles and the nation as a whole continues to creep downward, but alarm about gang-related crime is on the rise again: During L.A.'s spring mayoral campaign, accusations flew about which candidate would be "soft" on gangs. In recent months, publications such as Newsweek magazine and the Washington Post have run articles warning of "blood-spattered urban streets" and a "new wave of gang brutality." In May, a so-called gangbusters bill that would allow prosecutors to transfer 16- and 17-year-old gang members to adult court for a wide range of charges without judicial review and would impose a list of new, harsh mandatory minimum sentences was fast-tracked through the U.S. House. It will likely hit the Senate floor this fall — if a competing bill cosponsored by Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) doesn't get there first.

Certainly, it's essential to more effectively address the gang violence that continues to cause unbearable sorrow in communities all over America. Yet good, functional solutions rarely emerge from headline-driven public emotion. It also might help to remember that although there were 463 gang murders last year in Los Angeles County, the number is significantly lower than during the so-called decade of death of the late 1980s to mid-1990s when, in 1992 alone, 803 such killings turned certain streets into free-fire zones.

In the hardest-hit neighborhoods, funerals became so frequent that the local mortician's face was as weirdly familiar as that of a favorite uncle.

The trauma of those deadly years produced a number of books by academics and journalists trying to understand what caused the violence and what might best be done in terms of public policy to lessen it. But what was always missing from the analytical mix was an insightful narrative written from the inside.

Although no major books have yet come out of East L.A.'s Latino street gangs active during that period, the African American gangs of South L.A. have produced two books of significance. "Monster: The Autobiography of an L.A. Gang Member," by Sanyika Shakur, a.k.a. Monster Kody Scott, in 1993 and now "Inside the Crips: Life Inside L.A.'s Most Notorious Gang," by 39-year-old Colton Simpson.

Shakur used prose of diamond-hard precision to blast open the doors to the most brutal aspects of gang life, daring the reader to look inside. Yet the narrative was short on self-reflection, thus reinforcing the very stereotypes it wanted to dispatch. Simpson also documents urban warfare with unflinching intensity, but the reader must provide much of the analysis. Nevertheless, "Inside the Crips" has several important strengths that "Monster" lacks. For one thing, Simpson shows us exactly how and why a bright, personable kid comes to join a gang and why that same kid would choose to stay despite the lethal risks, the constant soul-battering violence and the inevitable incarcerations.

The story begins as Simpson's father, a pro baseball player for the old Los Angeles Angels, effectively abandons young Colton and his two brothers to their unbalanced mother, a nurse, who beats the boys with a plastic baseball bat and anything else that comes to hand during her frequent drunken rages. When Colton is 8, his mother rousts him and his year-older brother, Damon, out of bed and — leaving their baby brother behind — drives the two pajama-clad kids to another part of the city where, incredibly, she leaves them, blindfolded, by the side of the road. The boys are taken in by their kindly maternal grandmother who, while caring, seems able to do little more than pray, plead and ultimately turn a blind eye when her traumatized grandson takes to the street. At age 9, Simpson meets "Smiley," a muscular and charismatic 14-year-old homeboy who will eventually initiate him into gang life. Simpson's description of the encounter is so drenched with loneliness and father-longing that it suggests a religious conversion: "… and then he smiles and it's as if the light, the sun behind him, fills me, fills each and every one of us standing there before him…. 'Don't worry. I'ma toughen you up, though. Make you hardcore.' " From then on, Smiley becomes the yearned-for big brother-dad figure charged with bringing order and warmth to the younger boy's chaotic world.

One of the most harrowing scenes takes place a year later, when Simpson officially joins the Rollin' 30s Harlem Crips. During the day, Simpson is a child, thrilled to have hit a home run in a Little League game. Late that night, however, the skinny boy sneaks out to be "courted in" to the Crip set by Smiley and other teenage gangsters. The initiation consists of a storm of punches and kicks administered by the older kids. But once he has withstood enough bruising to prove himself, the gang members each hug Simpson tenderly. "You in, cuz," they tell him. "One of us, Li'l Cee."

Then they all get their guns. It seems that the day before, some "enemy" gang members — Bloods — shot at one of the Crips, and retaliation is considered mandatory. Simpson is allowed to go along for the payback and is supplied with a .38 for the occasion. "If Smiley can do it, I can," he tells himself when they locate their quarry, and Simpson empties his gun with abandon. "It's easy. Like playing with Damon." Tragically, he's a natural. Two of his bullets connect, and the 10-year-old watches with detached awe as blood spreads across two now-quieting teenage bodies..

Viewed through the lens of the evening news, such ghastly incidents suggest bands of junior psychopaths who should be locked up for as long as possible. But Simpson's narrative lays down enough emotional bread crumbs to make the route from Little League to body bags depressingly easy to map. The morning after the shootings, the boy is shattered by what has occurred, and one hopes for a wise adult to pull him back from further ruination. None appears. In his mind, a Rubicon has been crossed. "I can't take back what I've done," Simpson writes. "It's not forgivable." Neither will he confess his terrible feelings of guilt to anyone. "To do so will shame me." The feeling of guilt passes, he writes with disconcerting plainness. "It's like being a virgin."

Years of easy death and serial incarceration follow, as Simpson makes us watch "my grandma's church-going grandson" becoming subsumed by the rising ghetto superstar Li'l Cee Loc (Loc for "Loco"). It is an unsettling portrait, akin to watching a man who is drowning at sea bob occasionally to the surface before finally going under.

The most unexpectedly compelling and original sections of the book concern Simpson's time in various California prisons. In the last decade, the various über gang structures inside the state's correctional institutions — the eme (Mexican Mafia), Nuestra Familia, CCO (Consolidated Crip Organization) and the AB (Aryan Brotherhood) — have strengthened until they are essentially captive criminal nations.

Simpson gives us fresh, detailed snapshots of this highly disciplined supergang existence, where survival involves keeping abreast of group politics so intricate they resemble high-court intrigue, and shot-callers attempt to imbue the organization with higher meaning by cobbling together a history cum mythology that includes a pantheon of heroes, special days and an elaborate secret language that is rewritten the minute it can be understood by rival groups or the guards.

Because California's enormous prison system barely avoided federal receivership last year (it's healthcare system was taken over by the government this summer for "incompetence and outright depravity," in the words of a U.S. District Court judge), it is instructive to read Simpson's portrayal of life "inside," where there is a dearth of even cosmetic attempts at prisoner rehabilitation. Instead, the system appears to cultivate the basest themes in everyone's nature as prison modules are repeatedly on lockdown and correctional officers treat prisoners with a dehumanized viciousness, more likely to create viciousness, in turn, than cure it.

Simpson details instances of guards deliberately promoting dissension between ethnic groups, setting up gladiator fights among rivals and, in one horrific case, sadistically refusing Simpson's cellmate his daily asthma inhaler until the man lies on his cell floor strangling and subsequently dies (episodes made more credible by the fact that similar incidents have been well-documented in such prisons as Corcoran and Pelican Bay).

In light of California's prisoner recidivism rates, which are among the the highest in the nation, Simpson's accounts of his assorted releases and re-incarcerations are also valuable to evaluate. Although he begins parole with the best of intentions, prison has given him zero preparation for life on the outside, and few employers seem eager to hire a felon — a situation exacerbated by the fact that he's shot at within 30 minutes of his homecoming in 1985. When Simpson is arrested six months later, he sounds almost relieved. "Jail's my second home…. " he writes. "Actually the handcuffs don't bother me…. Extending my arms early in the morning has become second nature."

It's only after a 12 1/2 -year stint in lockup that Simpson finally marshals the maturity to leave gang life behind — yet it's done despite a correctional system that is theoretically designed to better him. The change includes a string of dark nights of the soul in which Simpson comes to terms with the beginnings of self-responsibility fueled by a lacerating sense of remorse. Yet he credits the bulk of his transformation to an unlikely series of mentors whom he met while he was incarcerated: a prison lieutenant who treated him "like a human being," Black Panther lifer Ruchell Magee and famously wrongly convicted inmate Geronimo Pratt. "The institution simply taught me carnage," Simpson writes, "and reinforced the violence taught by [stepfather] Pete, by Smiley, by the Bloods. Instead I learned what I needed from the rare man able to rise above the hellhole circumstances."

Or, to put it another way, although the child Colton had no good dad to rescue him, perhaps the adult Colton Simpson was finally able to fashion the right composite of fathers to rescue himself.

Now, however, comes another twist, post-publication: Since his parole in 1998, other than a two-year period in jail fighting an attempted murder charge, Simpson appears to have tried to lead a clean life, working mostly for old friend rapper-actor Ice-T. Soon, however, Simpson will begin trial on charges stemming from the 2003 robbery of a Robinsons-May jewelry department in Temecula. If convicted, he faces a possible life sentence under California's three strikes law. Simpson has pleaded not guilty. This month, Riverside County Superior Court Judge Mark A. Cope ruled that portions of "Inside the Crips" that depict robberies committed by the author more than 20 years ago would be admitted into trial as evidence against him.

http://www.calendarlive.com/books/bookr ... bookreview

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Unread post by leftcoast » August 30th, 2005, 1:07 pm

lol wut a dumbass, but anyway i'm bout half way thru this book and so far it look like a rip off of monster same with the loko book "home of the body bags" fools bite str8 off monster's shit but monsters wuz better then both of these books in my opinion, i aint read the tookie autobiography yet, but i'm tired of these gang books they repetitive as fuck and directly copy off monsters shit they got no originality its like readin the same tiring bs again and again except with different gang names

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Unread post by SkoobyDoo » August 30th, 2005, 2:06 pm

LOL@using his book to convict him. Damn idiot...

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Unread post by Q » August 31st, 2005, 2:28 pm

leftcoast wrote:lol wut a dumbass, but anyway i'm bout half way thru this book and so far it look like a rip off of monster same with the loko book "home of the body bags" fools bite str8 off monster's shit but monsters wuz better then both of these books in my opinion, i aint read the tookie autobiography yet, but i'm tired of these gang books they repetitive as fu-- and directly copy off monsters shit they got no originality its like readin the same tiring bs again and again except with different gang names


what do u want them 2 lie and make shit up ? they aint gonna be too different cuz they all bangin

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Unread post by leftcoast » August 31st, 2005, 3:50 pm

naw they can write it or describe it in a different way and style

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Inside the Crips Life Inside L.A.'s Most Notorious Gang

Unread post by Christina Marie » October 1st, 2005, 1:27 am

The making of a gang member

Inside the Crips Life Inside L.A.'s Most Notorious Gang Colton Simpson with Ann Pearlman St. Martin's: 324 pp., $24.95

By Celeste Fremon
Celeste Fremon is the author of "G-Dog and the Homeboys" and a criminal justice fellow at USC Annenberg's Institute for Justice and Journalism.

THE crime rate in Los Angeles and the nation as a whole continues to creep downward, but alarm about gang-related crime is on the rise again: During L.A.'s spring mayoral campaign, accusations flew about which candidate would be "soft" on gangs. In recent months, publications such as Newsweek magazine and the Washington Post have run articles warning of "blood-spattered urban streets" and a "new wave of gang brutality." In May, a so-called gangbusters bill that would allow prosecutors to transfer 16- and 17-year-old gang members to adult court for a wide range of charges without judicial review and would impose a list of new, harsh mandatory minimum sentences was fast-tracked through the U.S. House. It will likely hit the Senate floor this fall — if a competing bill cosponsored by Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) doesn't get there first.

Certainly, it's essential to more effectively address the gang violence that continues to cause unbearable sorrow in communities all over America. Yet good, functional solutions rarely emerge from headline-driven public emotion. It also might help to remember that although there were 463 gang murders last year in Los Angeles County, the number is significantly lower than during the so-called decade of death of the late 1980s to mid-1990s when, in 1992 alone, 803 such killings turned certain streets into free-fire zones.

In the hardest-hit neighborhoods, funerals became so frequent that the local mortician's face was as weirdly familiar as that of a favorite uncle.

The trauma of those deadly years produced a number of books by academics and journalists trying to understand what caused the violence and what might best be done in terms of public policy to lessen it. But what was always missing from the analytical mix was an insightful narrative written from the inside.

Although no major books have yet come out of East L.A.'s Latino street gangs active during that period, the African American gangs of South L.A. have produced two books of significance. "Monster: The Autobiography of an L.A. Gang Member," by Sanyika Shakur, a.k.a. Monster Kody Scott, in 1993 and now "Inside the Crips: Life Inside L.A.'s Most Notorious Gang," by 39-year-old Colton Simpson.

Shakur used prose of diamond-hard precision to blast open the doors to the most brutal aspects of gang life, daring the reader to look inside. Yet the narrative was short on self-reflection, thus reinforcing the very stereotypes it wanted to dispatch. Simpson also documents urban warfare with unflinching intensity, but the reader must provide much of the analysis. Nevertheless, "Inside the Crips" has several important strengths that "Monster" lacks. For one thing, Simpson shows us exactly how and why a bright, personable kid comes to join a gang and why that same kid would choose to stay despite the lethal risks, the constant soul-battering violence and the inevitable incarcerations.

The story begins as Simpson's father, a pro baseball player for the old Los Angeles Angels, effectively abandons young Colton and his two brothers to their unbalanced mother, a nurse, who beats the boys with a plastic baseball bat and anything else that comes to hand during her frequent drunken rages. When Colton is 8, his mother rousts him and his year-older brother, Damon, out of bed and — leaving their baby brother behind — drives the two pajama-clad kids to another part of the city where, incredibly, she leaves them, blindfolded, by the side of the road. The boys are taken in by their kindly maternal grandmother who, while caring, seems able to do little more than pray, plead and ultimately turn a blind eye when her traumatized grandson takes to the street. At age 9, Simpson meets "Smiley," a muscular and charismatic 14-year-old homeboy who will eventually initiate him into gang life. Simpson's description of the encounter is so drenched with loneliness and father-longing that it suggests a religious conversion: "… and then he smiles and it's as if the light, the sun behind him, fills me, fills each and every one of us standing there before him…. 'Don't worry. I'ma toughen you up, though. Make you hardcore.' " From then on, Smiley becomes the yearned-for big brother-dad figure charged with bringing order and warmth to the younger boy's chaotic world.

One of the most harrowing scenes takes place a year later, when Simpson officially joins the Rollin' 30s Harlem Crips. During the day, Simpson is a child, thrilled to have hit a home run in a Little League game. Late that night, however, the skinny boy sneaks out to be "courted in" to the Crip set by Smiley and other teenage gangsters. The initiation consists of a storm of punches and kicks administered by the older kids. But once he has withstood enough bruising to prove himself, the gang members each hug Simpson tenderly. "You in, cuz," they tell him. "One of us, Li'l Cee."

Then they all get their guns. It seems that the day before, some "enemy" gang members — Bloods — shot at one of the Crips, and retaliation is considered mandatory. Simpson is allowed to go along for the payback and is supplied with a .38 for the occasion. "If Smiley can do it, I can," he tells himself when they locate their quarry, and Simpson empties his gun with abandon. "It's easy. Like playing with Damon." Tragically, he's a natural. Two of his bullets connect, and the 10-year-old watches with detached awe as blood spreads across two now-quieting teenage bodies..

Viewed through the lens of the evening news, such ghastly incidents suggest bands of junior psychopaths who should be locked up for as long as possible. But Simpson's narrative lays down enough emotional bread crumbs to make the route from Little League to body bags depressingly easy to map. The morning after the shootings, the boy is shattered by what has occurred, and one hopes for a wise adult to pull him back from further ruination. None appears. In his mind, a Rubicon has been crossed. "I can't take back what I've done," Simpson writes. "It's not forgivable." Neither will he confess his terrible feelings of guilt to anyone. "To do so will shame me." The feeling of guilt passes, he writes with disconcerting plainness. "It's like being a virgin."

Years of easy death and serial incarceration follow, as Simpson makes us watch "my grandma's church-going grandson" becoming subsumed by the rising ghetto superstar Li'l Cee Loc (Loc for "Loco"). It is an unsettling portrait, akin to watching a man who is drowning at sea bob occasionally to the surface before finally going under.

The most unexpectedly compelling and original sections of the book concern Simpson's time in various California prisons. In the last decade, the various über gang structures inside the state's correctional institutions — the eme (Mexican Mafia), Nuestra Familia, CCO (Consolidated Crip Organization) and the AB (Aryan Brotherhood) — have strengthened until they are essentially captive criminal nations.

Simpson gives us fresh, detailed snapshots of this highly disciplined supergang existence, where survival involves keeping abreast of group politics so intricate they resemble high-court intrigue, and shot-callers attempt to imbue the organization with higher meaning by cobbling together a history cum mythology that includes a pantheon of heroes, special days and an elaborate secret language that is rewritten the minute it can be understood by rival groups or the guards.

Because California's enormous prison system barely avoided federal receivership last year (it's healthcare system was taken over by the government this summer for "incompetence and outright depravity," in the words of a U.S. District Court judge), it is instructive to read Simpson's portrayal of life "inside," where there is a dearth of even cosmetic attempts at prisoner rehabilitation. Instead, the system appears to cultivate the basest themes in everyone's nature as prison modules are repeatedly on lockdown and correctional officers treat prisoners with a dehumanized viciousness, more likely to create viciousness, in turn, than cure it.

Simpson details instances of guards deliberately promoting dissension between ethnic groups, setting up gladiator fights among rivals and, in one horrific case, sadistically refusing Simpson's cellmate his daily asthma inhaler until the man lies on his cell floor strangling and subsequently dies (episodes made more credible by the fact that similar incidents have been well-documented in such prisons as Corcoran and Pelican Bay).

In light of California's prisoner recidivism rates, which are among the the highest in the nation, Simpson's accounts of his assorted releases and re-incarcerations are also valuable to evaluate. Although he begins parole with the best of intentions, prison has given him zero preparation for life on the outside, and few employers seem eager to hire a felon — a situation exacerbated by the fact that he's shot at within 30 minutes of his homecoming in 1985. When Simpson is arrested six months later, he sounds almost relieved. "Jail's my second home…. " he writes. "Actually the handcuffs don't bother me…. Extending my arms early in the morning has become second nature."

It's only after a 12 1/2 -year stint in lockup that Simpson finally marshals the maturity to leave gang life behind — yet it's done despite a correctional system that is theoretically designed to better him. The change includes a string of dark nights of the soul in which Simpson comes to terms with the beginnings of self-responsibility fueled by a lacerating sense of remorse. Yet he credits the bulk of his transformation to an unlikely series of mentors whom he met while he was incarcerated: a prison lieutenant who treated him "like a human being," Black Panther lifer Ruchell Magee and famously wrongly convicted inmate Geronimo Pratt. "The institution simply taught me carnage," Simpson writes, "and reinforced the violence taught by [stepfather] Pete, by Smiley, by the Bloods. Instead I learned what I needed from the rare man able to rise above the hellhole circumstances."

Or, to put it another way, although the child Colton had no good dad to rescue him, perhaps the adult Colton Simpson was finally able to fashion the right composite of fathers to rescue himself.

Now, however, comes another twist, post-publication: Since his parole in 1998, other than a two-year period in jail fighting an attempted murder charge, Simpson appears to have tried to lead a clean life, working mostly for old friend rapper-actor Ice-T. Soon, however, Simpson will begin trial on charges stemming from the 2003 robbery of a Robinsons-May jewelry department in Temecula. If convicted, he faces a possible life sentence under California's three strikes law. Simpson has pleaded not guilty. This month, Riverside County Superior Court Judge Mark A. Cope ruled that portions of "Inside the Crips" that depict robberies committed by the author more than 20 years ago would be admitted into trial as evidence against him. •

http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/search-handle-url/index%3Dbooks-ca%26field-subject%3DCrips%20%28Gang%29/702-6239025-1489638

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Book: "Inside The Crips"

Unread post by stamps » October 2nd, 2005, 8:15 pm

This article was recently published in a Temecula newspaper. Has anyone heard of this book "Inside The Crips"


Man given more time to get attorney in Temecula robbery case

By: JOHN HALL - Staff Writer

FRENCH VALLEY ---- A Superior Court judge Friday gave an admitted former gang member charged with a Temecula robbery one more chance to find an attorney.

Colton Simpson, 39, told Judge Mark Cope that he has talked to an attorney he may be retaining, but has been delayed by difficulty in getting evidence in his case from his previous attorney.

In August, Simpson's former attorney, H. Clay Jacke, declared an unspecified conflict and removed himself from the case just as jurors were being selected for the trial.

Simpson has yet to retain a new attorney, even though Cope has sternly told him to do so or he would appoint the public defender's office to represent him.

Over objections Friday by Deputy District Attorney Stephen Gallon, Cope said he must continue to postpone the court proceedings if he believes Simpson is making a good-faith effort to hire someone.

Cope set another hearing for Wednesday to update the status of Simpson's attempt to get an attorney.

Simpson is charged in connection with a March 2003 robbery of the jewelry department at the Robinson's-May store at The Promenade mall in Temecula.

Prosecutors allege that Simpson was the getaway driver in the crime.

Because this would be a third strike, if Simpson is convicted as charged, he could face a possible life sentence.

According to court documents, two men entered the Temecula store's jewelry department and one acted as a customer wanting to look at some 14-karat gold earrings. The robber jumped over the counter and tried to open a display case before the two men fled.

The men were seen running to a Ford Taurus parked nearby that had the license plate covered by a black piece of paper or plastic bag.

Two Temecula police officers spotted the car headed south on Interstate 15 and there was a high-speed pursuit that ended when police backed off because of public safety concerns.

During the chase, however, the item covering the license plate blew off, allowing officers to see the plate and determine that it belonged to a car rented at the San Diego airport.

Police found that Colton Simpson was listed as a second driver on the rental car, court documents state.

The two Temecula police officers identified Simpson as the driver of the car they chased after the hold up, and an employee of the jewelry store identified him as a man who had been in the business two days earlier asking about diamond earrings, court documents state.

Simpson was arrested March 19, 2003, two days after the robbery, as he drove a rented Mercedes-Benz through the immigration checkpoint in San Clemente. During a search of the car, prosecutors say, jewelry store brochures were found.

According to court documents, Simpson said he had been carjacked and forced to drive during the robbery. About 11 hours after the robbery, he tried to report the carjacking to Escondido police, the documents state.

Prosecutors hope to be able to admit evidence of Simpson's prior conduct at his trial, including portions of a book he authored called "Inside the Crips."

The book was published last month, and details Simpson's time as a member of a criminal street gang in Los Angeles.

In a court document seeking to admit Simpson's prior conduct, Gallon writes, "What is most relevant about the book is the extent to which the defendant relishes his career as a robber of jewelry stores."

Gallon cites this passage from the book to back up that claim: "Gangsters do what they want; civilians do what they can. During the robbery, adults did what I told them. Stores across L.A. are lavishly crammed with glimmering gold and sparkling stones. Twinkling glass waits to be smashed. Money on the vine to be harvested."

Simpson was convicted in Los Angeles in March 1986 of, among other crimes, two counts of robbery and one count of attempted murder, court documents state. He was sentenced to 22 years in prison and has since been paroled.

Gallon says in his motion to admit Simpson's prior acts, including what he writes in his book, that they pertain to Simpson's intent in the Temecula robbery.

"This book allegedly speaks of a transformation and a repudiation of the gang lifestyle," Gallon writes. "This book is neither.

"It is (a) vehicle to make money off the blood and terror of innocent victims," the prosecutor wrote. "Colton Simpson describes in vivid and fond detail certain memories of the terrible jewelry robberies he has done. It is though he is bragging about what he has done."

Contact staff writer John Hall at (951) 676-4315, Ext. 2628, or jhall@californian.com.

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Unread post by stamps » October 2nd, 2005, 8:44 pm

Ok, I just found this on the net. I thought the book sounded familiar.

Tales from a Crip may turn up in trial

INLAND ROBBERY: A gang member's life is told in a boastful book that
could be put into evidence.
11:09 PM PDT on Friday, July 22, 2005
By TAMMY McCOY / The Press-Enterprise

A man who could face life in prison if convicted on charges of robbing a
Temecula store could be confronted by his own admissions of a gang past if a judge lets prosecutors use his autobiography during trial.
Deputy District Attorney Stephen Gallon said he will file a motion by Aug. 4
requesting that Colton Simpson's "Inside the Crips" be admitted into evidence.
"I love doing jewelry store licks," Simpson writes. "It gets so I go in alone, ask
to see a Rolex, grab two, dash out of the store, turn them around, and have $8,000
stuffed in my pockets."
Simpson was 14 when he committed his first jewelry-store robbery at a
Torrance mall, according to the book. Simpson's partner got advice from Ice-T before
the robbery, the book claims.
"The cheap stuff is in the front, the gold watches are in glass cases in the back,
just like Tray (Ice-T) predicted," according to the book. "I have $25,000 to blow. I
can buy whatever I want, splurge on stuff I've only dreamed of."
In January 1985, Simpson was convicted in Los Angeles County of second-degree
burglary and was paroled in September 1985, according to the state
Department of Corrections.
"In the weeks that follow, I form a small crew of my own and embark on a
robbing spree," Simpson's book says. "I've made more money in a night than most
people make in months. I'm empowered. Invincible, It's addicting."
Simpson later describes stealing a ruby ring from a mall's jewelry store then
shooting a customer who jumped on his back to thwart an escape.
"I can't get him off me. I can't run," Simpson writes.
Simpson shot the customer in the liver, colon and lung with a .32-caliber
revolver, the book says. The customer, a 23-year-old man, was at the jewelry store
to buy an engagement ring.
Simpson sold the ruby ring for $30,000 and ultimately was arrested about six
months after he had been paroled.
"I have an ember of regret," Simpson writes.
Before his sentencing, Simpson's then-lawyer tells him the jewelry store
customer was given a citizen of the year citation.
"Yeah, some good citizen," Simpson writes. "Turned a simple theft into an
armed robbery with attempted murder charges. Got himself put in a wheelchair.
Stupid people complicating my life."
In June 1986, he was sentenced to 24 years in prison on armed-robbery
charges, according to state records.
He was released from prison after 12 years in June 1998, then went to work for
Ice-T. A few months later, in November 1998, Simpson was charged in Los Angeles
At the same time, Simpson's lawyer, Hurdle C. Jacke II, said he hopes to call as a witness actor and rapper Tracy Marrow, better known as Ice-T, star of the NBC-TV show "Law & Order: Special Victims Unit."

The two have been friends since Simpson was 10 and allegations about their youth are cited in the book. "He helps put everything into focus," Jacke said when asked about Ice-T's testimony. "Colton is his personal assistant on a professional and personal level. He was working for him in the San Diego area."

Ice-T's manager, Jorge Hinojosa, had no comment about the case or book. Simpson, 39, of Culver City, has pleaded not guilty to burglary, vehicle theft, grand theft and robbing a Robinsons-May jewelry department at the Promenade mall in Temecula on March 17,
2003.

If convicted, he could be eligible for a life sentence under the state's "three-strikes" law, said Ingrid Wyatt, spokeswoman for the Riverside County district attorney's office.

In his book, Simpson writes that he joined the Crips gang when he was 10, and admits to committing about 10 jewelry store and other robberies.County with attempted murder of a man who invested $20,000 in Simpson's music
label, according to the book and court records.
"I went to trial three times," Simpson writes. "I got two hung juries ... and was
convicted on all counts in the third, even though I had several witnesses who
testified as to my whereabouts during the crime, including a hospital pass and a
clerk."
Ice-T hired Jacke to defend Simpson and the conviction was overturned on
appeal, according to the book.
He was released from Los Angeles County jail in June 2002.
"Everything you read in this book is a true and accurate reflection of the people
and instances that have impacted me," Simpson's book says. "It is calculated that 28
percent of all black men will be sent to jail or prison in their lifetime. My people are
still enslaved."
Simpson writes that the book is intended to put the public spotlight on the gang
problem.
"I hope this book will educate people," the book says. "Thus, my pain will have
some value and do some good."
Simpson's trial is expected to begin in August. He remains in custody at the
Southwest Detention Center in French Valley.

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stamps
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Unread post by stamps » October 2nd, 2005, 9:06 pm

Sorry if some sentences don't seem complete,,I had to cut and paste from an Adobe Reader and it was a pain.

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Unread post by alexalonso » October 3rd, 2005, 7:29 pm

i havent read his book yet. but you can check it out at:

http://www.streetgangs.com/books/inside_the_crips
Last edited by alexalonso on October 23rd, 2005, 4:50 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Unread post by stamps » October 4th, 2005, 2:02 am

Me neither..it's going to be interesting how this pans out.

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Unread post by Dunn » October 4th, 2005, 1:06 pm

Damn this is fucked up, i read his autobiography and he went through a lot of shit, now he gettin sent up for the same old BS. If they admit his book into evidence he's fucked, cause he talks about them jewelry licks in a lot of detail, from the planning stages to the execution.

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Unread post by BIG DUSTY LOCO » October 5th, 2005, 9:46 am

Hmm...shouldn't ya'll NHB R20's read C-Loc's book?

Ya'll gotta be wondering what a Harlem R30 Crip would write.

Somebody compare it to that other R20 book...which one is better?

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Unread post by stamps » October 6th, 2005, 1:56 am

End Violence NOW wrote:
J-Hogg wrote:& by the way tacoma is way more active then PUSSY ass pasadena.

check the stats you weenie

http://www.morganquitno.com/cit01rank.pdf

tacoma is #120

pasadena is #235

damn i guess pasaweena ain't that hard afterall.LOL :lol:


Tacoma is smaller the Pasadena, Pasadena's active areas are harder. And that's not the point of this section.

Anyways, from what i heard so far, I believe that this guy is probably guilty, he seems to be "falling off the horse" (returning to his addiction, which is robbery). His book didn't sound very regretting, it seemed like he started out being regretful, then halfway through he starting thinking about how fun it was and wanted to go back.

Why does he still rob when he has Ice-T giving him a practically free ride, a job, etc?


End Violence Now,,yea that's too bad he slipped back to his old ways. I'm only guessing,,but Ice-T must be disappointed too. I also want to stay on topic for this,,let me address the retard and maybe he will go away..

Listen J-Hogg,,,a little advice,,It's probably not a good idea to start dissin' Pasadena on this site,,,I'll just leave it at that...and I know your trying your best in writing skills to make me "really angry" (the Pasaweenie thing was somewhat clever,,it must have takin all day for you to make that one up).. but I'm not angry at you at all,,I'm just really concerned,,,your making a complete idiot of yourself in front of thousands of, not only real gangsters from "The City",,but other curious internet browsers (students, citizens ect..) that read your dumb posts. You keep saying the same things over and over! Just slow down, and take a deep breath..It's 'Ok' to live in Tacoma Washington!,,I wish I could move there,,, because the air is so much cleaner, Ok?

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Unread post by alexisss » November 5th, 2005, 10:08 pm

I think his last courtdate was 11/4, anyone know what the outcome was?

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Unread post by George » November 19th, 2005, 9:47 am

Yeah this book does feel like it was kinda ripped off of Monster Kody's book.

Though the only saving grace for me is it gives the reader a Rolling 30's perspective of things...

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Unread post by IceDice » November 30th, 2005, 10:36 pm

i've read the book, i've read the artciles about his trial... i don't know what happened.

about the book though... i loved it. i haven't read Monster yet, but i'll definently look into it.

sorry i can't provide much insite. if anyone knows what's goin on with Cee now, i would really like to know.

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Unread post by IceDice » December 1st, 2005, 6:58 pm

just read that his court date is Dec. 5

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Unread post by not_the_one » December 5th, 2005, 6:55 pm

Holy crap reminds me of a book. I am not racist, i am just pointing out the racism of dis book, hes from the Aryan Brotherhood, he wrote it when he waz in jail, then for when dis book came out, it wasnt alowed in the normal bookstores, so dey put it in skinhead tatto kind of stores, and hes from Dallas, Texas n' he went for a vacation in the Los Angeles, he got into a fight cause hiz 14-year-old son was with a Neo Nazi kinda group n' these other teens got into a fight with him, like 5 or 6 15-year and 16 year olds, 2 black, 3 or 4 latinos, dey kicked hiz azz, broke hiz arm n' neck, paralised him for 3 or 4 months, hiz dad took out hiz hunting knife and stabbed 2 of the latinos in the back, stomach, ribs, n' arm n' the 2 black guys in the chest n' neck, the other latino got away, started running before that guy started to fuck dem bwoiz up, he got 35 years in prison, charges of 1 first degree murder, n' 1 3rd degree muder, it was at bout 1994 while hiz dad waz in the beer store, punk was wearin the wrong colours, anywayz dis book made skinheads n' white supremacists even more intact with beefin' with the multiracial gangs, gave dem courage, itz a hardcover, 385 page book, itz like a hate thing against the rollin 20s crips that fucced up hiz son, so he wrote a book that got him 10 more years in jail, fuccin dumbass, the way the book got on the market - have no idea but i herd somewhere that dis huge azz dude waz slippin the pages for the fatass, yep he was called fatskin cause he waz fat n' a skinhead, then the 10 more years got him pissed n' he joined aryans, n' the bigazz guy waz hiz bwoiz "friend's" uncle, he waz at a low security prision(mostly cops with batons n' glock 12), small size prision(for all i care, that bitch should have been put in the federal n' rot for life), bout 200-250 prisoners, n' 85 cops to fuckin control dem all, fuckin dumbass waz 39 at the time, 39 + 45 = 84 years when he get the next trial, do the math, that cocksuckas dead before he gets out.....


Book name:

Carbs Or Slobs, They Are All Niggers

By "Fatskin" Bob

Real name:

Bobby "The Skinhead" Fatskin

His finnish-polish-british-german kind of ancertry gave him the name. Hiz name is "Fatskin" cause when he was born, he was like over 15 kilos, fatazz baby.... Fat since he waz born, damn................

Note to all those ppl tellin me to find the link to the book or where i got the guy's biography, fuck you, u can get the damn websites urself, if u dun want to n' dun belive me, who cares, u r goin to have to look everyday at dis article for the time dis topic iz active, so u can just sit here n rot by curiousity of gettin pissed cause i won ur little game of "Beef". Im not gonna say anythin more(not!).

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Unread post by peace » December 21st, 2005, 3:59 pm

I think it's too much like Monster. He tells everything just like Sanyika did, and i really don't like it.. Monster is my favourite book, and I've read it 4 times. I love it!

Sometimes it feels that Colton is some wannabe and take all his facts from Sanyika's book. Songs are same, Big Heron (?) story.. I don't get why he wanted to write a book, which released in 1992? It's same book, but Monster is lot of better because Sanyika is better writer. And Sanyika did always mention where the things happened (like 59th St and Third Ave)

MiChuhSuh

Unread post by MiChuhSuh » December 21st, 2005, 4:52 pm

not_the_one wrote:Book name:

Carbs Or Slobs, They Are All Niggers

By "Fatskin" Bob

Real name:

Bobby "The Skinhead" Fatskin


could find info on this book anywhere, where did you see it?

MiChuhSuh

Unread post by MiChuhSuh » December 21st, 2005, 4:55 pm

^ I meant could not find info

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Inside the Crips/ Cee Loc

Unread post by xxx » January 2nd, 2006, 6:31 pm

Ran through this book.......Thumbs Down.

The title dont fit the story he tells. He was a robber and a jail house dude.
He has no good street stories or history to tell.

I met dude over my homeboy's house, and he aint no gang bang type. He's a slick talking jacker who hung around other jackers and gamblers.

He wasnt a Block Boy in the nitty gritty like that. But i have not heard any bad comments about him, he made it through 4800, he mentions reptible names that i know, and none of them say anything good or bad about dude....

He claims the Ave's out of the 30's, and is one of the few 30s that push Rollin / 0s. He quotes an old street saying in his book:

5-Deuse what ever we dude
6-Owe where ever we go
Tray-Owe is all i know....

Only older heads know about that alliance....

Its a alright bok, not a must read................................

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don't buy the book!!!

Unread post by Simpson » March 14th, 2006, 10:59 am

While I support Colton in his current court case, I cannot in good consience support this book.

I am Coltons brother, and the stories about our childhood published in this book are not accurate. Colton is apparently the only one who remembers things happening the way he says they did in the book. Neither me, or my other 2 brothers feel that the statements made in the book are accurate. Yes there were 4 of us (eventhough the book only says there were 3).

While I can't speak on some of the events he talks about, because I was either too young or not their. I can speak on the things I was there for and do remember, and that my other brothers also remember.

I don't know what crimes he or didn't commit, or what happened to him in prison, but I do know what happpend in our house when we were kids. some of the things he says about when we were kids are partially true, but keep in mind that I said PARTIALLY true.

Secondly, there is a picture of us as kids that no one authorized them to use, and my name is in the book, which I did not authorize.

There were 4 revision to this book from Coltons original manuscript. And if they want to change the facts, and talk about other peoples lives, they should at least have the decency to ask people if they can use their names and pictures.

Do not buy this book. But support Colton, because i do think that he is not getting a fair trial in his current court case.

Anonymous20

Re: don't buy the book!!!

Unread post by Anonymous20 » March 15th, 2006, 3:51 am

Simpson wrote:While I support Colton in his current court case, I cannot in good consience support this book.

I am Coltons brother, and the stories about our childhood published in this book are not accurate. Colton is apparently the only one who remembers things happening the way he says they did in the book. Neither me, or my other 2 brothers feel that the statements made in the book are accurate. Yes there were 4 of us (eventhough the book only says there were 3).

While I can't speak on some of the events he talks about, because I was either too young or not their. I can speak on the things I was there for and do remember, and that my other brothers also remember.

I don't know what crimes he or didn't commit, or what happened to him in prison, but I do know what happpend in our house when we were kids. some of the things he says about when we were kids are partially true, but keep in mind that I said PARTIALLY true.

Secondly, there is a picture of us as kids that no one authorized them to use, and my name is in the book, which I did not authorize.

There were 4 revision to this book from Coltons original manuscript. And if they want to change the facts, and talk about other peoples lives, they should at least have the decency to ask people if they can use their names and pictures.

Do not buy this book. But support Colton, because i do think that he is not getting a fair trial in his current court case.


If the book is an autobiography, he has the obligation to talk about you and anyone else in his life without asking for permission. Now if he said something that was untrue that defames your character, then you would be in a position to sue the publisher. You would have to have some substantial evidence that he is not telling the truth. Just saying its not true is not enough to establish plagiarism,

But if you support your brother Colton, you should support his book too. He will earn royalties for each book sold and that money supports him, right? By boycootting his book, that is a form of not supporting him. But you have everyright to, and I am sure you have your reasons. That's cool, but I dont think you can't make both statements, Don't buy Colton's book, but support him. But welcome to the board.

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Unread post by grundy » June 8th, 2006, 8:13 am

^ which brother is this. Damon from the 6-0. I also talked to some OG's from RSC and RTC and they said he put extras on some shit but he was a crazy dude. Alonso could you keep us updated with what his trial is doing. The last I heard he said the Harlem's kidnapped him and made him steal the jewlery. Interesting also to read about Big Rick in the book. His brother dying is what started the war between the 60's and ETG. Alonso can you get an interview with the brother.

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Re: don't buy the book!!!

Unread post by solidgold » June 30th, 2006, 9:48 am

Simpson wrote:While I support Colton in his current court case, I cannot in good consience support this book.

I am Coltons brother, and the stories about our childhood published in this book are not accurate. Colton is apparently the only one who remembers things happening the way he says they did in the book. Neither me, or my other 2 brothers feel that the statements made in the book are accurate. Yes there were 4 of us (eventhough the book only says there were 3).

While I can't speak on some of the events he talks about, because I was either too young or not their. I can speak on the things I was there for and do remember, and that my other brothers also remember.

I don't know what crimes he or didn't commit, or what happened to him in prison, but I do know what happpend in our house when we were kids. some of the things he says about when we were kids are partially true, but keep in mind that I said PARTIALLY true.

Secondly, there is a picture of us as kids that no one authorized them to use, and my name is in the book, which I did not authorize.

There were 4 revision to this book from Coltons original manuscript. And if they want to change the facts, and talk about other peoples lives, they should at least have the decency to ask people if they can use their names and pictures.

Do not buy this book. But support Colton, because i do think that he is not getting a fair trial in his current court case.

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