L.A. shifts tactics against gangs

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L.A. shifts tactics against gangs

Unread post by funk on site » January 14th, 2007, 6:19 am

The city will focus on the worst ones regardless of size and use 'stay-away' orders against leaders.

By Patrick McGreevy and Richard Winton
Times Staff Writers

Los Angeles' top law enforcement officials have agreed on a new attack on gang violence, one that focuses more enforcement on smaller neighborhood gangs and uses a new legal tool tried last year on skid row.

The effort comes asL.A. officials are trying to quell a 14% increase in gang-related crime during the last year, marked by several high-profile incidents of race-motivated violence.

LAPD Chief William J. Bratton met this week with Dist. Atty. Steve Cooley and representatives of City Atty. Rocky Delgadillo to begin formulating the plan.

Bratton announced Tuesday that his department is developing a "Top 10" list of gangs to target based on a complex formula — and then the three agencies will devote additional officers and attorneys specifically to those gangs.

The campaign will include targeting the leaders and headquarters of the worst gangs.

Police have identified 720 street gangs in Los Angeles, with 39,315 members. But officials said a small number of them are causing a disproportionate amount of crime in the hardest-hit neighborhoods.

The new strategy is something of a shift for law enforcement officials, who have until now focused much attention on larger gangs that run drug rings and other criminal enterprises.

Bratton told the Police Commission that his office will identify "the most prolific gangs in the city, the top 10, if you will.

"We will be using a matrix that encompasses violent crime committed by the gangs, interracial crime, assaults on police officers," Bratton said. "That's how we will winnow the hundreds of gangs in the city down to those that we will focus most of our attention on."

Deputy Police Chief Charlie Beck, the commanding officer of the South Bureau, said the matrix will give extra weight to certain kinds of activity, such as race-based attacks.

As a result, the 204th Street gang in the Harbor Gateway will probably make the top 10 list even though it has committed fewer crimes than much larger gangs, Beck said.

Police have accused members of that Latino gang of the racially motivated killing of a 14-year-old African American girl.

The LAPD has already deployed an extra 18 officers to the neighborhood, and Beck said the number could double once 204th Street is included in the top 10 list.

Another gang likely to be considered for the list is Canoga Park Alabama, a relatively small gang that police say is responsible for a disproportionate amount of violence in the Valley, where gang crime was up nearly 40%.

Jeff Isaacs, chief of criminal prosecutions for the city attorney's office, agreed that the new strategies on gangs are going to particularly target areas that haven't been traditional gang strongholds: Harbor Gateway and parts of the San Fernando Valley where gang crime climbed at a higher rate than in the more infamous gang territories.

"The San Fernando Valley has seen a real spike in gang crime," Cooley said.

Prosecutors also plan to use "stay-away orders" against gang leaders. Such orders are included in the terms of offenders' probation and forbid them from being in a certain neighborhood. Officials hope these orders will be more effective than traditional gang injunctions, which prohibit gang members from congregating.

Stay-away orders, which were employed against drug users on skid row, can be easier to enforce, because they are a condition of probation and a violation can immediately put the offender back in jail. And, under a new early-release policy set to be implemented soon, the Los Angeles County sheriff will no longer hold inmates sentenced to County Jail under gang injunctions for their entire sentences.

In addition to prosecutors targeting leaders of the selected gangs with court orders, Delgadillo said his office plans to file nuisance abatement lawsuits to target gang headquarters.

"We are going to go after the top 10 hangouts in the city of Los Angeles," he said. "Gangs — like other enterprises — need a place to plan."

He said his office successfully used this tactic on an apartment complex at 69th and Main streets, which he said was home to the East Coast Crips gang.

The situation in Harbor Gateway may end up being a model for the new effort.

Bratton said he has put Beck in charge of a working group to address the problems in the Harbor Gateway area, where some African American residents said Latino gangs do not allow them onto certain streets.

He said the new strategy will include the use of gang injunctions ordering gang members not to loiter or congregate in the area, as well as stay-away orders aimed at gang leaders who have been convicted of crimes.

"There are no injunctions in that area," Beck said.

Cooley said he's ready to seek the stay-away orders.

African American community activist Morris Griffin attended the Police Commission meeting Tuesday to call for action to stop the racial violence, including the installation of surveillance cameras on street corners where crime is occurring.

"I'm a strong advocate for cameras on the streets, to take back our streets, because of this terrorist act with people chasing our people out of the neighborhood, when you talk about the black and the brown," Griffin told the panel.


(INFOBOX BELOW)

Legal weapons against gangs
Top law enforcement officials have vowed to crack down on gangs this year.

What are gang injunctions?

These are court orders that prevent gang members from congregating. The orders have been used for years by law enforcement agencies in efforts to prevent gang members from gathering and committing crimes.

How effective are the injunctions?

Local and federal officials said some injunctions have contributed to a reduction in gang activity, usually when they are part of a larger crackdown that might involve increased police patrols and undercover stings. But some critics say the injunctions sweep up people who are not active gang members.

What are the "stay-away orders" now being discussed?

These are orders attached to an individual's terms of probation. The orders prevent an individual from being in certain neighborhoods. Officials have used these orders with drug users who were arrested on skid row, preventing them from returning.

What is the record with these orders?

Officials believe the effort will be effective on skid row, though no numbers are available. The orders could be easier to enforce than the injunctions because they are a condition of probation and violation can put an offender back in jail immediately.

What else are officials considering?

The city attorney's office plans to target leaders of the selected gangs with nuisance abatement lawsuits. Officials said the office successfully used this tactic on the hangout of the East Coast Crips in South Los Angeles.

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Unread post by DK » January 16th, 2007, 5:50 pm

lol Bratton has no clue what the hell he's doing.

Anonymous20

Re: L.A. shifts tactics against gangs

Unread post by Anonymous20 » January 17th, 2007, 5:42 pm

Don't be surprised when a mason with a desk job and alterior motives take over a gang website mah zaggin, white people want to run everything, especially street gangs.

They always want the power, in everything you black men do. They will even give up some goods just to get the upper hand on you. To that I say, "beware" that means you too muslims!

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Unread post by Mcminister » January 17th, 2007, 5:45 pm

white people jst greedy ass people they wont everything

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C.U.R.E. Organization brings ‘healing’ to West

Unread post by R love » February 12th, 2007, 8:43 pm

nGang interventionists offer programs, mentoring, films

By Shirley Hawkins
OW Staff Writer
A few years ago, Reynaldo Reaser remembers Helen Keller Park in the West Athens area as ‘turf’ where gunfire from rival gangs rang through the air and innocent bystanders were frequently shot or killed.
The park was the stomping ground of the Raymond Avenue Crips, and Reaser, 27, a gang member since his teens, admits that he was deeply enmeshed in the gang way of life.
“We used to hang in the park with our pistols and guns and we would terrorize the park,” recalls Reaser. “I used to commit robberies, and I went to jail twice for assault with a deadly weapon and once for attempted murder.”
The ex-gang member admitted that gang life was so harrowing that he never knew whether he would still be alive from one day to the next. “One time, two rival gang members walked up on me wearing trenchcoats. One of them was carrying a gage shotgun and the other one had a .45 handgun. They said, ‘What’s up, blood?’” I didn’t run when I saw their gun. I just threw up my set and they just looked at me and smiled. They glanced at each other as if to say, ‘He’s got heart,’ and they walked away.”
But Reaser began to realize that gang warfare was causing death and destruction in the community. “I saw too many of my friends die. I saw innocent children die,” admitted Reaser. “I saw too many mothers crying. The residents--especially the kids--were scared to come to the park.”
While serving a stint in jail, Reaser received word through the grapevine that a rival gang member had gunned down his best friend at Helen Keller. “A gang member strolled into the park waving an Uzi. My friend stood up to face him and this gang member shot him down in cold blood. That happened in 1994,” Reaser said.
Shaken by the murder of his friend, Reaser decided to turn his life around. “I had been a problem in my community, and now I was determined to be a solution,” Reaser recalled.
Concerned about the bloodshed in the streets, Reaser and other activists met at Congresswoman Maxine Waters’ office to forge a peace treaty with rival gangs in 2001. During meetings for the treaty, Reynaldo met activist Cameron Bonner, whom he knew from the neighborhood but who was not a gang banger. “We decided to bring the peace treaty to the park. We decided to hold a rapping contest and for the first time, our rivals--the Bloods--showed up and participated.”
The two friends decided to form a non-profit organization called C.U.R.E.--Common Unity Reaching Everyone--dedicated to gang abatement and mentoring at-risk youth.
Since the formation of C.U.R.E. six years ago, the two co-founders have been working to bring programs to the park while continuing their mission of ridding the neighborhood of gang warfare.
Maurice Hunter, director of Helen Keller Park, noted that along with the County Park programs, CU.R.E. has been instrumental in improving the quality of life in the park. “Turning this gang problem around is a collaborative effort. One group can’t do it alone,” admitted Hunter. “We are all working toward a common goal to make our park safer.”
Marvo Hider, assistant park director, said that the change in the park is symbolized by the erection of its colorful mural called the “Wall of Love,” which features a “love train” and such inspirational figures as Cesar Chavez, Helen Keller, and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. “All you don’t need no money and no tickets. All you need to ride the train is love,” said Hider.
As part of the gang abatement program, the co-founders invite ex-gang members, police officers, and other community members to speak to the youth to discourage them from joining gangs.
“We’re developing mentoring programs to assist at-risk children,” said Bonner. “We have a program called Pride, Honor and Discipline, or P.H.D., where we teach young males to learn to respect themselves, women, and their community. We also have a weekly gang abatement class called Act Right which teaches youth respect, discipline, and how to behave in public, as well as how to participate in organized sports. Most of the members are former gang members. Our motto is, ‘If I was a problem I am now a solution,’” said Bonner.
Bonner said that he and Reaser have taken at-risk youth under their wings. One youth who is being mentored is Panner, 16, whose older brother, Taco, was killed near the park three years ago by gang members. “He’s made a 180-degree turn in his life--he is no longer angry and violent. He’s now more humble, he gets involved in sports and in his community. But we’re sad because there aren’t enough programs for children like Panner,” said Bonner.
Other C.U.R.E. activities include grafitti removal, field trips, computer training and community breakfasts.
Aware that the West Athens area had no movie theatre, the co-founders began contacting local and civic officials urging them to bring film screenings to Helen Keller. “There were no movie theatres in South Central, Compton or Watts,” recalls Bonner, who eventually met Katy Haber, producer ofthe action thriller Blade Runner and a board member of the British Academy of Film and Television Arts. Haber agreed to bring independent movies to Helen Keller.
BAFTA screens one independent movie a month, whose positive messages reach an eager audience of children ages eight to 18. “We now have the only licensed movie theatre in the inner city,” said Bonner.
On Saturday, nearly 100 residents attended the internationally acclaimed and Oscar-winning film Tsotsi, a film chronicling the life of a South African gang member and his ultimate redemption. A screening of the movie Three Kings starring rapper-turned-actor Ice Cube is scheduled to be shown on Feb. 24.
“We are also working to establish a full-production multi-media film, radio, and television arts program at Helen Keller Park and we hope to inspire future filmmakers and writers in the African American and Latino communities,” said Bonner.
Where once the park was feared and shunned by community residents, C.U.R.E. co-founders and park officials have observed that neighbors have once more embraced the park as their own. “We’re still continuing to keep Helen Keller safe and the local gangs in our community now respect the park,” said Bonner. “The kids are no longer afraid--they and the community are safe to come and go.”
Reaser and Bonner are especially gratified that the gangs now utilize the park to mediate disputes. “Some of the gangs came to the park before the showing of Tsotsi and they were actually able to stop a problem before someone got hurt. So we’ve turned the park into a place of healing. That is why we call ourselves C.U.R.E.,” said Bonner.
To contact C.U.R.E., call (310) 864-6979

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Unread post by Christina Marie » February 12th, 2007, 8:45 pm

Mcminister wrote:white people jst greedy ass people they wont everything
You are so racist

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Re: L.A. shifts tactics against gangs

Unread post by MafiaG » February 13th, 2007, 1:56 pm

funk on site wrote:The city will focus on the worst ones regardless of size and use 'stay-away' orders against leaders.

By Patrick McGreevy and Richard Winton
Times Staff Writers

Los Angeles' top law enforcement officials have agreed on a new attack on gang violence, one that focuses more enforcement on smaller neighborhood gangs and uses a new legal tool tried last year on skid row.

The effort comes asL.A. officials are trying to quell a 14% increase in gang-related crime during the last year, marked by several high-profile incidents of race-motivated violence.

LAPD Chief William J. Bratton met this week with Dist. Atty. Steve Cooley and representatives of City Atty. Rocky Delgadillo to begin formulating the plan.

Bratton announced Tuesday that his department is developing a "Top 10" list of gangs to target based on a complex formula — and then the three agencies will devote additional officers and attorneys specifically to those gangs.

The campaign will include targeting the leaders and headquarters of the worst gangs.

Police have identified 720 street gangs in Los Angeles, with 39,315 members. But officials said a small number of them are causing a disproportionate amount of crime in the hardest-hit neighborhoods.

The new strategy is something of a shift for law enforcement officials, who have until now focused much attention on larger gangs that run drug rings and other criminal enterprises.

Bratton told the Police Commission that his office will identify "the most prolific gangs in the city, the top 10, if you will.

"We will be using a matrix that encompasses violent crime committed by the gangs, interracial crime, assaults on police officers," Bratton said. "That's how we will winnow the hundreds of gangs in the city down to those that we will focus most of our attention on."

Deputy Police Chief Charlie Beck, the commanding officer of the South Bureau, said the matrix will give extra weight to certain kinds of activity, such as race-based attacks.

As a result, the 204th Street gang in the Harbor Gateway will probably make the top 10 list even though it has committed fewer crimes than much larger gangs, Beck said.

Police have accused members of that Latino gang of the racially motivated killing of a 14-year-old African American girl.

The LAPD has already deployed an extra 18 officers to the neighborhood, and Beck said the number could double once 204th Street is included in the top 10 list.

Another gang likely to be considered for the list is Canoga Park Alabama, a relatively small gang that police say is responsible for a disproportionate amount of violence in the Valley, where gang crime was up nearly 40%.

Jeff Isaacs, chief of criminal prosecutions for the city attorney's office, agreed that the new strategies on gangs are going to particularly target areas that haven't been traditional gang strongholds: Harbor Gateway and parts of the San Fernando Valley where gang crime climbed at a higher rate than in the more infamous gang territories.

"The San Fernando Valley has seen a real spike in gang crime," Cooley said.

Prosecutors also plan to use "stay-away orders" against gang leaders. Such orders are included in the terms of offenders' probation and forbid them from being in a certain neighborhood. Officials hope these orders will be more effective than traditional gang injunctions, which prohibit gang members from congregating.

Stay-away orders, which were employed against drug users on skid row, can be easier to enforce, because they are a condition of probation and a violation can immediately put the offender back in jail. And, under a new early-release policy set to be implemented soon, the Los Angeles County sheriff will no longer hold inmates sentenced to County Jail under gang injunctions for their entire sentences.

In addition to prosecutors targeting leaders of the selected gangs with court orders, Delgadillo said his office plans to file nuisance abatement lawsuits to target gang headquarters.

"We are going to go after the top 10 hangouts in the city of Los Angeles," he said. "Gangs — like other enterprises — need a place to plan."

He said his office successfully used this tactic on an apartment complex at 69th and Main streets, which he said was home to the East Coast Crips gang.

The situation in Harbor Gateway may end up being a model for the new effort.

Bratton said he has put Beck in charge of a working group to address the problems in the Harbor Gateway area, where some African American residents said Latino gangs do not allow them onto certain streets.

He said the new strategy will include the use of gang injunctions ordering gang members not to loiter or congregate in the area, as well as stay-away orders aimed at gang leaders who have been convicted of crimes.

"There are no injunctions in that area," Beck said.

Cooley said he's ready to seek the stay-away orders.

African American community activist Morris Griffin attended the Police Commission meeting Tuesday to call for action to stop the racial violence, including the installation of surveillance cameras on street corners where crime is occurring.

"I'm a strong advocate for cameras on the streets, to take back our streets, because of this terrorist act with people chasing our people out of the neighborhood, when you talk about the black and the brown," Griffin told the panel.


(INFOBOX BELOW)

Legal weapons against gangs
Top law enforcement officials have vowed to crack down on gangs this year.

What are gang injunctions?

These are court orders that prevent gang members from congregating. The orders have been used for years by law enforcement agencies in efforts to prevent gang members from gathering and committing crimes.

How effective are the injunctions?

Local and federal officials said some injunctions have contributed to a reduction in gang activity, usually when they are part of a larger crackdown that might involve increased police patrols and undercover stings. But some critics say the injunctions sweep up people who are not active gang members.

What are the "stay-away orders" now being discussed?

These are orders attached to an individual's terms of probation. The orders prevent an individual from being in certain neighborhoods. Officials have used these orders with drug users who were arrested on skid row, preventing them from returning.

What is the record with these orders?

Officials believe the effort will be effective on skid row, though no numbers are available. The orders could be easier to enforce than the injunctions because they are a condition of probation and violation can put an offender back in jail immediately.

What else are officials considering?

The city attorney's office plans to target leaders of the selected gangs with nuisance abatement lawsuits. Officials said the office successfully used this tactic on the hangout of the East Coast Crips in South Los Angeles.
yes yes we all know grape street crips is the most tuff gang of all.

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Unread post by Shox112 » February 13th, 2007, 6:32 pm

yes yes we all know grape street crips is the most tuff gang of all.
U damn right 8) :wink:

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Unread post by BlaKK » February 13th, 2007, 7:44 pm

Christina Marie wrote:
Mcminister wrote:white people jst greedy ass people they wont everything
You are so racist
Not really christina. Mcmini i agree my nigg.

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Unread post by BlaKK » February 13th, 2007, 7:46 pm

Shox112 wrote:
yes yes we all know grape street crips is the most tuff gang of all.
U damn right 8) :wink:

GSWBLC pete roll mafia is most definitly most notorious for that gorilla gang bang in my book. period nigga.

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Unread post by BlaKK » February 13th, 2007, 7:49 pm

i smoked blunts with them nigga's from Baby Loc, and nigga from the 99. yall nigga's made that last move to insane.

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Unread post by junta » February 15th, 2007, 2:11 am

BlaKK wrote:i smoked blunts with them nigga's from Baby Loc, and nigga from the 99. yall nigga's made that last move to insane.
If grape street crips are so hard, why don't they let these racist Hispanic gangs have it? Answer that shit for me Huh? That's what I thought!

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Unread post by rocstar » February 15th, 2007, 3:22 am

junta wrote:
BlaKK wrote:i smoked blunts with them nigga's from Baby Loc, and nigga from the 99. yall nigga's made that last move to insane.
If grape street crips are so hard, why don't they let these racist Hispanic gangs have it? Answer that shit for me Huh? That's what I thought!
What they suppossed to do chase eses around greater Los Angeles? Grapes is still one of the strong Crip sets left aint no racist eses going after them!

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Unread post by BlaKK » February 15th, 2007, 3:51 am

nigga i was right there @ that payless off East 103rd the other day nigga smokin a cigarette, ain't no Mexican in sight.

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Unread post by rocstar » February 15th, 2007, 4:54 am

BlaKK wrote:nigga i was right there @ that payless off East 103rd the other day nigga smokin a cigarette, ain't no Mexican in sight.
LOL come on now Blakk, not a Mexican in sight in Watts? It's still alot of Black folks out there but come on now.

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Unread post by BlaKK » February 15th, 2007, 5:04 am

Im just sayin nigga i was right there @ the shoe less smokin a ciggerete in that shopping center off East 103rd and i aint see one Mexican in sight.

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Unread post by Shox112 » February 15th, 2007, 12:54 pm

If grape street crips are so hard, why don't they let these racist Hispanic gangs have it? Answer that shit for me Huh? That's what I thought!
WE DID, ASK ABOUT WHAT WE DID TO COLONIA WATTS...THEY IN CPT NOW WITH THE T-FLATS, ASK OTHER PEEPS WHY FLORENCIA DONT SET FOOT IN WATTS...BOTTOM LINE MEXICANS LIVE IN WATTS BUT ITS NEVER A "MEXICAN PROBLEM" IN WATTS AND THAT NOT ONLY GO FOR MY HOOD IT GOES FOR THE BH's, PJ's, AND EVERYBODY ELSE IN BETWEEN

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Unread post by Shox112 » February 15th, 2007, 12:54 pm

WE DID, ASK ABOUT WHAT WE DID TO COLONIA WATTS...THEY IN CPT NOW WITH THE T-FLATS, ASK OTHER PEEPS WHY FLORENCIA DONT SET FOOT IN WATTS...BOTTOM LINE MEXICANS LIVE IN WATTS BUT ITS NEVER A "MEXICAN PROBLEM" IN WATTS AND THAT NOT ONLY GO FOR MY HOOD IT GOES FOR THE BH's, PJ's, AND EVERYBODY ELSE IN BETWEEN

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Unread post by Shox112 » February 15th, 2007, 12:54 pm

WE DID, ASK ABOUT WHAT WE DID TO COLONIA WATTS...THEY IN CPT NOW WITH THE T-FLATS, ASK OTHER PEEPS WHY FLORENCIA DONT SET FOOT IN WATTS...BOTTOM LINE MEXICANS LIVE IN WATTS BUT ITS NEVER A "MEXICAN PROBLEM" IN WATTS AND THAT NOT ONLY GO FOR MY HOOD IT GOES FOR THE BH's, PJ's, AND EVERYBODY ELSE IN BETWEEN

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Unread post by Shox112 » February 15th, 2007, 12:55 pm

WE DID, ASK ABOUT WHAT WE DID TO COLONIA WATTS...THEY IN CPT NOW WITH THE T-FLATS, ASK OTHER PEEPS WHY FLORENCIA DONT SET FOOT IN WATTS...BOTTOM LINE MEXICANS LIVE IN WATTS BUT ITS NEVER A "MEXICAN PROBLEM" IN WATTS AND THAT NOT ONLY GO FOR MY HOOD IT GOES FOR THE BH's, PJ's, AND EVERYBODY ELSE IN BETWEEN

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