Afro Mexicans

These concepts are socially constructed and have been given much weight. What are your thoughts?
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Afro Mexicans

Unread post by Common Sense » August 2nd, 2004, 9:50 pm

Africans and Mexicans at one time shared a common bond....life together in mexico. Today's Blacks and Latino's are at each other's throats over racial diffrences...but at one time racially intergrated.


http://www.timbooktu.com/alva/afromex.htm
Last edited by Common Sense on August 28th, 2004, 1:34 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Afro Mexican's

Unread post by NYorker » August 3rd, 2004, 3:40 pm

Common Sense wrote:Africans and Mexicans at one time shared a common bond....life together in mexico. Today's Blacks and Latino's are at each other's throats over racial diffrences...but at one time racially intergrated.


http://www.timbooktu.com/alva/afromex.htm
Nice reference:
Here's another one check out the pics and the history.

http://members.aol.com/_ht_a/fsln/notables.htm

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Re: Afro Mexican's

Unread post by Common Sense » August 3rd, 2004, 4:52 pm

Thanks NYorker.

It's amazing how close we really are when you scratch the surface and dig a little deeper.

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Re: Afro Mexican's

Unread post by 100 » August 4th, 2004, 12:47 am

AFRO MEXICANS ARE IN THE VERA CRUZ AREA THE POP. IS VERY LOW MEXICANS ARE MAINLY MEXICAN INDIANS OR MEZTIZOS AND SOME EUROPEAN


AFROMEX ARE CONCENTRATED ON THE COASTAL LINES MANY MIGRATED TO BELIZE

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Re: Afro Mexican's

Unread post by 100 » August 4th, 2004, 12:48 am

AFRO MEXICANS ARE IN THE VERA CRUZ AREA THE POP. IS VERY LOW MEXICANS ARE MAINLY MEXICAN INDIANS OR MEZTIZOS AND SOME EUROPEAN


AFROMEX ARE CONCENTRATED ON THE COASTAL LINES MANY MIGRATED TO BELIZE


AFRO MEXICANS ARE NOT BLACK THEY ARE LATINO AND THE MEXICANS YOU SEE IN CALIFA ARE MEZTIZO OR MOSTLY SOME KIND OF MEXICAN INDIAN YOU CAN SEE THE LOOK IN THEIR FACES

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Re: Afro Mexican's

Unread post by 100 » August 4th, 2004, 12:49 am

AFRO MEXICANS ARE IN THE VERA CRUZ AREA THE POP. IS VERY LOW MEXICANS ARE MAINLY MEXICAN INDIANS OR MEZTIZOS AND SOME EUROPEAN


AFROMEX ARE CONCENTRATED ON THE COASTAL LINES MANY MIGRATED TO BELIZE


AFRO MEXICANS ARE NOT BLACK THEY ARE LATINO AND THE MEXICANS YOU SEE IN CALIFA ARE MEZTIZO OR MOSTLY SOME KIND OF MEXICAN INDIAN YOU CAN SEE THE LOOK IN THEIR FACES


TO TOP IT OFF WHAT MAKE YOU THINK AFRICAN SLAVES SHARED A COMMON BOND WITH MEZTIZOS OR EUROPEANS IN MEXICO AFRO-MEXICANS ARE THE FORGOTTEN MEXICANS BUT OFF TOP THEY ARE LATINO AND NOT AFRICAN AMERICAN/BLACK

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Re: Afro Mexican's

Unread post by guerrillablackhawk » August 12th, 2004, 3:14 pm

100 wrote:AFRO MEXICANS ARE IN THE VERA CRUZ AREA THE POP. IS VERY LOW MEXICANS ARE MAINLY MEXICAN INDIANS OR MEZTIZOS AND SOME EUROPEAN


AFROMEX ARE CONCENTRATED ON THE COASTAL LINES MANY MIGRATED TO BELIZE


AFRO MEXICANS ARE NOT BLACK THEY ARE LATINO AND THE MEXICANS YOU SEE IN CALIFA ARE MEZTIZO OR MOSTLY SOME KIND OF MEXICAN INDIAN YOU CAN SEE THE LOOK IN THEIR FACES


TO TOP IT OFF WHAT MAKE YOU THINK AFRICAN SLAVES SHARED A COMMON BOND WITH MEZTIZOS OR EUROPEANS IN MEXICO AFRO-MEXICANS ARE THE FORGOTTEN MEXICANS BUT OFF TOP THEY ARE LATINO AND NOT AFRICAN AMERICAN/BLACK
olmecs oldest & aztecs

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Re: Afro Mexican's

Unread post by 100 » August 12th, 2004, 3:23 pm

I DON'T THINK ANYONE WILL ADMIT THAT AFRICAN INFLUENCE AND SOME OF THE SLAVES BUILD SOME OF THEM PYRAMIDS IN MEXICO BUT I GARANTEE YOU EVERY MEXICAN WILL DENY THIS

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Re: Afro Mexican's

Unread post by Common Sense » August 12th, 2004, 7:05 pm

This is a great article:

African Roots Stretch Deep into Mexico

By Roberto Rodriguez and Patrisia Gonzales
© 1996 Chronicle Features - Reproduced in Mexico Connect with Permission.
!


March 3, 1996 -- In Mexico, various Indian peoples still play ancient instruments. And their songs and dances -- which tell of uprisings against their masters -- pay tribute to their ancestors.
These Mexicans play African "hand pianos" and perform "the dance of the black people." Mexican "corridos" -- or song-stories -- tell of slave uprisings. And the marimbas of Mexico, as well as those of Central America and Ecuador, all have their origins in Africa.

All are examples of the still thriving African legacy in Mexico.

Since 1492, the history of the Americas has been forged by three cultures: indigenous, European, and African - the third root of the Americas, according to the late University of Veracruz professor, Gonzalo Aguirre Beltrán, who was considered Mexico's foremost expert on the African influence on Mexican culture.

The early African presence in the Americas is normally associated with the slave trade in the United States, the Caribbean, Brazil, Central America, Colombia and Peru. Not generally taught in history textbooks is that Mexico was also a key port of entry for slave ships and consequently had a large African population.

In fact, during the colonial era, there were more Africans than Europeans in Mexico, according to Aguirre Beltrán's pioneering 1946 book, "The Black Population in Mexico." And he said they didn't disappear, but in fact took part in forging the great racial mixture that is today Mexico.

"Because of race mixture, much of the African presence is no longer discernible except in a few places such as Veracruz and the Costa Chica in Guerrero and Oaxaca," wrote Aguirre Beltrán.

In Mexico, many of the Africans that entered came to what are now the states of Yucatan, Michoacan, Tlaxcala, Mexico, Chiapas, Veracruz, Guerrero and Oaxaca. Contrary to popular thought, they did not remain in the south but migrated throughout the whole of Mexico, where they were employed in occupations such as mining, the textile industry, ranching, fishing and agriculture. Blacks in Mexico weren't simply slaves. Many were explorers and cofounders of settlements as far north as Los Angeles and other parts of what is today the Southwest United States.

Prior to independence from Spain, there were numerous slave rebellions throughout the Americas, including in Mexico. The first documented slave rebellion in Mexico occurred in 1537; this was followed by the establishment of various runaway slave settlements called "palenques." Some rebellions were in alliance with Indians and mestizos even as far north as Chihuahua. In 1608, Spaniards negotiated the establishment of a free black community with Yagna, a runaway rebel slave. Today, that community in Veracruz bears its founder's name.

The principal guerrilla fighters for Mexican independence from Spain were Indians, mestizos and mulattos. One of the primary leaders of the independence movement, José María Morelos y Pavón, was mulatto, or of African ancestry, as was Vicente Guerrero, Mexico's second president, who officially abolished slavery in 1822. Slavery was actually not done away with until 1829.

Of note, Aguirre Beltrán's research was not well-received in Mexico, says Gabriel Moedano Navarro, director of ethnohistory at the National Museum of Anthropology in Mexico. By 1946, the psyche of the Mexican nation as a mixture of Indian and Spanish blood was well-formed.

Also hidden from history is Mexico's role as a sanctuary to African American slaves during the 19th century. Unknown to even most historians, descendants of these slaves still live in Mexico.

In the summer of 1850, the Mascogos, composed of runaway slaves and free blacks from Florida, along with Seminoles and Kikapus, fled south from the United States, to the Mexican border state of Coahuila. Accompanying the Seminoles were also 'Black Seminoles' -- slaves who had been freed by the tribe after battles against white settlers in Florida.

The three groups eventually settled the town of El Nacimiento, Coahuila, where many of their descendants remain, including some of our distant relatives.

The African presence in Mexico is not so much denied as it is obscured. Aguirre Beltrán's work has brought to light something most Mexicans and Mexican Americans have historically been unaware of -- that they, like other Latinos, have not only Indian and Spanish blood, but African blood as well.

In times of racial discord between Latinos and African Americans, this historical confluence of cultures should serve as a reminder that both communities share common ancestors. In fact, if we probe far enough, we're all related.


Latino Spectrum is a nationally syndicated column, distributed by Chronicle Features.
Rodriguez/Gonzales can be reached at XColumn@AOL.COM.

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Re: Afro Mexican's

Unread post by 100 » August 14th, 2004, 2:09 pm

NO ONE CARES AND MEXICANS WILL ARGUE YOU TO DEATH THAT THOSE ARE INDIAN INSTRUMENTS ITS TOO LATE!

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Re: Afro Mexican's

Unread post by NYorker » August 14th, 2004, 3:32 pm

100 wrote:NO ONE CARES AND MEXICANS WILL ARGUE YOU TO DEATH THAT THOSE ARE INDIAN INSTRUMENTS ITS TOO LATE!
Too late for what? Those "mexicans" that will argue to death about it.....are the mexican equivalent of "uncle Toms" and wannabee Euro-fags.! Bunch of pinche' garbachos.

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Re: Afro Mexican's

Unread post by Common Sense » August 14th, 2004, 3:57 pm

Here is another great article:

You know all this black/mexican racism toward one another get's more ridiculus as I researceh this history.

It's almost like the "Pot calling the Kettle" black....LOL. It's amazing what we can learn when we open our minds.



African Mexicans try for a lasting identity

The goal: Finding roots while overcoming bias
April 11, 2002

BY LAURENCE ILIFF
DALLAS MORNING NEWS

SAN NICOLAS, Mexico -- Dark-skinned Mexicans along the southern Pacific Coast have long sensed that their roots are distinct from the mixed-race majority dominated by European and Indian blood.

But until relatively recently, many had only a sketchy idea why.

"A popular story says we came from a stranded African ship," said Jorge Zapata, 38, a schoolteacher from the Costa Chica, or "small coast," south of Acapulco. "It's a nice story. But as it turns out, the truth isn't so nice because we came in chains as slaves and were the first ones to drown."

Now, African Mexicans along the coast are discovering their roots, countering negative stereotypes, and trying to find their place in Mexican history.

Government-issued textbooks describe coastal residents as festive dancers who happily raise cattle and corn. Crude drawings depict the physical characteristics of African Mexicans without offering much history.

Zapata, who worked in California in the early 1990s, said the books are clearly offensive, so he offers his preteen students a crash course in "negritud," or "blackness," to counter official stereotypes. He has also helped establish a museum to explain the arrival of Africans in Mexico and to instill pride in their heritage.

The Spanish conquistadors, alarmed by the death of Indian laborers to disease and overwork, brought up to a half-million African slaves to Mexico from the 1500s to the 1800s to work in mines.

Some escaped and formed runaway slave communities in towns along the Costa Chica, which was set in thick jungle. Mexico abolished slavery in 1821.

In some ways, blacks in Mexico today are following in the footsteps of the Indian rights movement that was re-energized after the 1994 Mayan uprising by the Zapatista rebels and their charismatic leader, Subcomandante Marcos, residents said. Indeed, most blacks have Indian blood from intermarriage.

An important factor in black identity in Mexico, leaders said, has been immigration to the United States by poor coastal residents who must confront their racial identity in the United States.

Likewise, visits by black Americans during the last decade have given blacks in Mexico a sense of camaraderie.

"I feel very much at home here," said Ron Wilkins, a black American activist, teacher and photographer visiting from Los Angeles. "I've met black families who are very conscious and very committed to seeing black people become more visible and become empowered and take their place in the 21st Century."

Wilkins, who has exhibited his photos of African Mexicans in the United States, said he is impressed by the lack of racial and social tension within Black Indian communities.

"One of the things I come here to learn more about is that despite the racism in the larger Mexican society," people in Mexico "seem to get along and live together at a level of harmony that is very hard to find in the United States," he said.

Black and Mexicans in the United States need to learn that they have more in common than they might think, he said. For example, Mexicans in Texas participated in the Underground Railroad to shuttle black slaves to freedom in Mexico, Wilkins said.

African Mexicans, a blend of black, Indian and white blood, are not counted in the official census. Though their presence is heaviest on the Pacific and Gulf coasts where the slave trade was focused, historians have said African blood is common throughout the population.

Every year since 1996, African Mexicans have held an Encounter of Black Mexico, featuring regional dances, music and roundtable discussions about black life.

In late March, the event was held in San Nicolas, a dusty village with dirt roads and homes with mostly dirt floors. Many people in the village migrate to the United States to work.

Before hundreds of visitors, schoolchildren performed the Apache dance, a mix of Indian and African traditions, and the Dance of the Devils, which in part is a reminder of the poor treatment slaves received at the hands of their oppressors.

"My color may be white, but my roots are black," said Maria de Jesus Marin, 24, who participated in a roundtable discussion on black women. "The racism here continues as always, because it's still the black women who wash clothes and clean up after the white women."

Marin works as a teacher's assistant at a school in El Ciruelo. The school was established by the local Catholic parish because many schoolchildren can't afford to travel to the nearest government school, she said.

But outside of African-Mexican communities, ignorance of black life remains, as does discrimination, residents said.

"When I left here and went to Mexico City for the first time in 1982, I realized that people looked at me differently, as if they were suspicious of me for some reason," said Guadalupe Jaime Noyola, 41, who splits his time between San Nicolas and North Carolina.

"When I am in the United States, I feel better because no one hassles me."

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Re: Afro Mexican's

Unread post by Common Sense » August 15th, 2004, 10:16 am

Check out this homepage:

http://www.afromexico.com

Definetly look at the photo gallery posted on the top right.

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Re: Afro Mexican's

Unread post by E`S`T » August 15th, 2004, 11:50 am

VERY INTERESTING..BUT ONE QUESTION, HOW MANY OF YOU BLACK FOLKS HAVE FAMILY THAT WAS BORN HERE IN THE U.S??? AND HOW MANY CAN TRACE THEIR ROOTS TO ANY AFRICAN/CARRIBEAN/ANYTHING OTHER THAN U.S CITIZENS?? DO YOU PPL EVEN KNOW YOUR OWN HISTORY?? BECAUSE AS MUCH AS THIS IS INTERESTING, NONE OF YOU HAVE ANY CONNECTIONS TO ANY OF THIS RIGHT?? I MEAN, I CAN TRACE MY ROOTS AS FAR BACK AS MY GRANDFATHER'S GRANDFATHER. WHAT "TRACE RACE" ARE PEOPLE ON THIS BOARD????

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Re: Afro Mexican's

Unread post by jb7777 » August 17th, 2004, 8:50 pm

many may not but its definitely not our fault...blacks have experienced a disenfranchisement that mexicans havent. many of us have deep native american roots also. Many of us would find out that our ancestors were also white with some extensive research. But we will and always will be proudly claim our black heritage. Can you speak your native toungue...not spanish...lol...if not then you should know what i mean sam doobie.

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Re: Afro Mexican's

Unread post by E`S`T » August 17th, 2004, 8:57 pm

^^^TRUE...

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Re: Afro Mexican's

Unread post by Silencioso » August 18th, 2004, 4:03 pm

There were no blacks in pre-Columbian Mexico. The indigenous culture is Indian.

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Re: Afro Mexican's

Unread post by FLUID » August 28th, 2004, 12:48 am

So are there a lot of blacks in the country of Mexico?

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Re: Afro Mexican's

Unread post by NYorker » August 28th, 2004, 6:43 am

Silencioso wrote:There were no blacks in pre-Columbian Mexico. The indigenous culture is Indian.
You are incorrect......you need to research that more holmes. I can give you some links to that info if you want.

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Re: Afro Mexicans

Unread post by fatlaces » August 28th, 2004, 4:13 pm

Theres no use in arguing about it homies....Cause mexico itself has its own racism.....I've noticed the more euro the mexican looks the better off they are compared to the mexicans that are darker or look much more indian, but I do believe there was some Afeican influence or presence in Mexico...you should see the olmec stone carvings...the faces have african facial features.....

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Re: Afro Mexican's

Unread post by never die inside » August 28th, 2004, 7:04 pm

S-DOOBIE wrote:VERY INTERESTING..BUT ONE QUESTION, HOW MANY OF YOU BLACK FOLKS HAVE FAMILY THAT WAS BORN HERE IN THE U.S??? AND HOW MANY CAN TRACE THEIR ROOTS TO ANY AFRICAN/CARRIBEAN/ANYTHING OTHER THAN U.S CITIZENS?? DO YOU PPL EVEN KNOW YOUR OWN HISTORY?? BECAUSE AS MUCH AS THIS IS INTERESTING, NONE OF YOU HAVE ANY CONNECTIONS TO ANY OF THIS RIGHT?? I MEAN, I CAN TRACE MY ROOTS AS FAR BACK AS MY GRANDFATHER'S GRANDFATHER. WHAT "TRACE RACE" ARE PEOPLE ON THIS BOARD????
Would u rub it in someones face if their parents are divorced? Say shit like " yea, you dont even have a full family. I do."

Cmon dood, threatening to kick ass is one thing, but those kinda comments about family are unnecessary. You should know that better than everyone if you're really mexican.

BTW, Commonsense. This is a great thread. Im impressed. My impression of you went up greatly.

And, Native Americans came from China. So all mexicans are really Chinese if u trace ur roots wayyy back. LOL!

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Re: Afro Mexicans

Unread post by 'X' » August 28th, 2004, 7:13 pm

What's up Saddam? Haven't heard from you in a minute.

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Re: Afro Mexicans

Unread post by never die inside » August 28th, 2004, 7:21 pm

D.X. wrote:What's up Saddam? Haven't heard from you in a minute.
wussup homie! shiet haha long time. me i've been koo, just blazin and tryna figure out wut the fukk imma do for the rest of my life...hahaha

man theres so much racial tension up in here man! sheeeeeeeet.

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Re: Afro Mexicans

Unread post by 'X' » August 28th, 2004, 7:37 pm

Saddam wrote:
D.X. wrote:What's up Saddam? Haven't heard from you in a minute.
wussup homie! shiet haha long time. me i've been koo, just blazin and tryna figure out wut the #%@& imma do for the rest of my life...hahaha

man theres so much racial tension up in here man! sheeeeeeeet.

What's up Saddam! Yeah I'm tripping off all the tension. I see I started alot of too, but I don't even really be responding back to these catsd nomore. The majority of this these post are repetitive bull!@#$. I can tell some of these cats themselves don't even believe the bull!@#$ they post, they just on here for fun and games. And I still trip off how when we mention what we of color have been through, alot of these cats start saying "oh, white people blah..blah..blah", you know what they say. They just refuse to accept their history. I'll be getting at you though homie.

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Re: Afro Mexicans

Unread post by Common Sense » August 28th, 2004, 8:17 pm

Pacific Currents: Mexicans of Costa Chica proud of black roots

Monday, June 11, 2001

By SUSAN FERRISS
COX NEWS SERVICE

SANTIAGO TAPEXTLA, Mexico -- When a group of American college students from Atlanta rolled into this obscure village on Mexico's Pacific coast recently, they found the classic scenes of Mexican rural life.

Peasant farmers ferried bags of corn on the backs of donkeys. Women cooked handmade tortillas over open fires.

But there was something about the color of this village that gave the students -- all of them African Americans -- a feeling of instant kinship.

"To be a black Mexican seems almost impossible. But they're here," said an excited Kieran Pearson, 20, an Indiana and Boston-bred student from Atlanta's Morehouse College, one of the United States' premier colleges traditionally for black men.

The students from Morehouse and Spelman College for women, its sister institution in Atlanta, quickly discovered that the people of Mexico's "Costa Chica" are of indisputable African origin.

The descendants of slaves who were brought in chains to Mexico's isolated Pacific Coast centuries ago, the Afro-Mexicans of the Costa Chica have the dark skin and features more commonly associated with the Caribbean or Brazil. Blacks also live in Veracruz state, along the Gulf of Mexico, but are concentrated in greater numbers in about 50 towns on the Costa Chica, a 250-mile stretch of land between Puerto Escondido and Acapulco.

Many blacks of recent generations have intermarried with indigenous Mexicans or mestizos, who are of mixed Spanish and Indian backgrounds. But the Costa Chicans say they're proud of the black roots of their regional culture.

"Relatives! You are welcome here," a nearly toothless but spirited village elder, Bertoldo Narvaez, 55, told the group of Americans in Spanish as they gathered under a large tropical tree to talk.

Just as Mexico's indigenous minorities are demanding recognition for their distinct cultures, Afro-Mexicans are calling on Mexico to more fully acknowledge this country's African heritage, its so-called "third root." Typically, Mexicans define their country as Spanish and indigenous. Both blacks and Indians complain of social discrimination and of living in areas with few paved roads, plumbing and schools.

Blacks on the Costa Chica have formed an ethnic rights group called "Mexico Negro," and they're forging ties with blacks in the Americas, including Americans, Central Americans, even Peruvians and Ecuadorians.

"No one on the Costa Chica was talking about reaching out to other people of the African Diaspora 10 years ago. This is really new," said Stanford University graduate student Bobby Vaughn, who is writing an anthropology dissertation on ethnicity in Mexico, including the black identity.

The village of Santiago Tapextla (pronounced Ta-PEST-la) is a poor hamlet of several thousand that last March played host to the fifth annual Reunion of Black People, an international gathering of blacks from Mexico, the United States, Honduras, Ecuador and other countries.

Census figures do not exist on people who call themselves black Mexicans. But Vaughn estimates that they may now number no more than 100,000 out of Mexico's almost 100 million people. Blacks participated in the earliest missions of the Spanish conquistadors, however.

For more than two centuries, between the late 1500s and early 1800s, blacks and African slaves may have outnumbered Spaniards nationwide before they began blending in with the mestizo population.

For several years, students from Morehouse and Spelman have sought to learn about the black culture of the Costa Chica. The trip that students take annually is part of a five-week Spanish language program in the city and state of Oaxaca (pronounced Wa-HA-ka). The Costa Chica is in Oaxaca and the state of Guerrero.

Blacks on the Costa Chica are mostly poor farmers who grow corn and a few other cash crops. Some are fishermen, and many migrate to work as laborers in Acapulco -- or, increasingly, the United States.

Mexican Leonides Narvaez, 44, worked in Charlotte, N.C., where he saw firsthand the United States' strong black heritage.

"I think the people of color there thought I was one of them," he said, speaking to the students at a thatched-roof restaurant here, where workers prepared them a special meal of chicken soup and tortillas.

Narvaez grinned at the memory of his encounters with black Americans.

"They used to walk past me and say, 'Wassup!'" he told the amused Americans.

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