Ethnic Stereotypes

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Ethnic Stereotypes

Unread post by Common Sense » July 23rd, 2005, 11:30 am

I was inspired to start this thread after visiting the Mexico's stamp (Menin Penigiun) thread. Many blacks on the street gang site is very offended about the stamps and should be, but Menin Penguin is just the tip of the iceberg. Black are stereotyped worldwide (I will put on this string). There are all kinds of stereotyping out there. Jews, Arabs, Native Americans, Mexicans, Japanese, Irish, and Welsh to name a few.

If you know of any major and established stereotypes of an ethnic group, please put it here.
Last edited by Common Sense on July 23rd, 2005, 12:09 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Unread post by Common Sense » July 23rd, 2005, 11:58 am

I have always felt that the major movie studios of Hollywood help keep racism alive by stereotyping people through cartoons, teaching innocent kids insensitve behaviors toward other people. Bugs Bunny was one of the biggest culprits of them all.

It's A Side of Bugs Bunny Many Fans Have Never Seen.

In "All This and Rabbit Stew," Bugs distracts a black rabbit-hunter by rattling a pair of dice. In "Any Bonds Today?" he appears in blackface. In "Frigid Hare," Bugs calls an ungainly, bucktoothed Eskimo a "big baboon."


In Toon With the Times.

The reversal shines a light on the early days of cartoons, when racially insensitive fare was common. Ethnic stereotypes were considered fair game, and animation, an art that depends on satire and edgy humor, fell in step with everyday prejudices. Icons such as Bugs Bunny also enlisted in the government's propaganda efforts during World War II; the cartoons that emerged were in sync with the nation's sensibilities at the time.

Politically Incorrect Rabbit.

Unflattering depictions of blacks, American Indians, Japanese and Germans are laced throughout early Bugs Bunny cartoons. Three years after Bugs had his debut in 1938 in a theatrical cartoon called "Porky's Hare Hunt," he outsmarted a dimwitted Indian in "Hiawatha's Rabbit Hunt."

Bugs's run-in with the black rabbit-hunter also was in theaters in 1941. In the cartoon, the pair disappear behind a bush to shoot craps. A 1942 cartoon featured Bugs Bunny imitating Al Jolson in full blackface. In a 1949 cartoon, Bugs sells tickets to "Uncle Tom's Cabinet," a spoof of Harriet Beecher Stowe's antislavery novel "Uncle Tom's Cabin."

The Cartoon Network knew a truly inclusive Bugs retrospective could offend some viewers. But with competition for cartoon lovers on the increase, people there figured that broadcasting the dozen in contention would boost Cartoon Network's claims to be "the world leader in animation." And it would be impossible to document the whole history of Bugs Bunny without showing racial stereotypes.

To address the disturbing cartoon content and to ensure that kids wouldn't be likely to see them, Cartoon Network planned to run the 12 out of chronological order and late at night. A disclaimer was to scroll across the bottom of the screen during the broadcast: "Cartoon Network does not endorse the use of racial slurs. These vintage cartoons are presented as representative of the time in which they were created and are presented for their historical value."

"We wanted to please the animation community," says Betty Cohen, Cartoon Network's president.

But Cartoon Network's plans were at odds with efforts by Warner Bros. to keep such images out of circulation. Warner Bros. began pulling Bugs Bunny cartoons featuring African-Americans from its TV packages in the late 1960s, sensitized by the civil-rights movement, says animation expert Jerry Beck. Cartoons featuring stereotyped American Indians disappeared from general viewing about five years ago. At about the same time, Warner Bros. withdrew a video compilation from Warner Bros. Studio Stores when it discovered that it contained a Bugs Bunny cartoon called "Bugs Nips the Nips," made during World War II.

More recently, when filmmaker Spike Lee was making the film "Bamboozled," which dealt extensively with black stereotypes in Hollywood, Warner Bros. turned down his request to include images of Bugs Bunny in blackface.


The Cartoon Network now says it plans to run a separate program about Bugs Bunny cartoons made during World War II, featuring clips of unflattering portrayals of Germans and Japanese. And the network is mulling yet another special featuring clips from all 12 cartoons that have been pulled from the Bugs retrospective.

SPEEDY GONZALES
Many networks don't show this cartoon anymore depicting Mexicans in a negative light. Speedy sometimes get help from his lazy cousin named Slowpoke Rodriquez and friends in town who are all a bunch of drunk lazy Mexicans.

PEPE LE PEW
Depicts french males as sexual predators and stalkers if they are rejected by women.

Marking campaigns still being used today using outdated stereotyped black American figures.
http://www.prmuseum.com/kendrix/abroad.html

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Unread post by Common Sense » July 23rd, 2005, 12:01 pm

How do you feel about sport teams bearing the names of Native Americans, such as:

1. The Washington Redskins. Do you know what redskin means or where the word came from???

2. Cleavland Indians.

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Unread post by Tyrant » July 23rd, 2005, 1:00 pm

Asian - you know kung fu and/or you do very good in school

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Unread post by Common Sense » July 23rd, 2005, 1:31 pm

Slakcs n a Tshirt wrote:Asian - you know kung fu and/or you do very good in school
Yea that's true, but doing very well in school is not the stereotypes I'm talking about. Doing well in school is an asset not discrimination.

Asians (as from the orient not India or Pakistan) would be stereotyped by wearing big round glasses, and having buckteeth as seen in this link. Just keep scrolling down.
http://www.encyclopedia-obscura.com/movieswar2.html

Interesting article (something a little more relevant):
WHY IS IT OK TO PICK ON ASIANS?
http://nikkeiview.com/archives03/012003.htm

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Unread post by Tyrant » July 23rd, 2005, 7:35 pm

Common Sense wrote:
Slakcs n a Tshirt wrote:Asian - you know kung fu and/or you do very good in school
Yea that's true, but doing very well in school is not the stereotypes I'm talking about. Doing well in school is an asset not discrimination.

Asians (as from the orient not India or Pakistan) would be stereotyped by wearing big round glasses, and having buckteeth as seen in this link. Just keep scrolling down.
http://www.encyclopedia-obscura.com/movieswar2.html

Interesting article (something a little more relevant):
WHY IS IT OK TO PICK ON ASIANS?
http://nikkeiview.com/archives03/012003.htm
i don't see much asians who fit the glass teeth stereotype thing

"Or it is because Asians as a group - not just in the media but in the public too - don't talk back when racism looks them in the eye?

We've always been a "model minority" but part of that is because we don't complain. We've been culturally programmed not to bring attention to ourselves. Too often, we stay silent when wrongs are committed against us. Look at the Japanese American internment, when phrases like "gaman" (endure) and "shigata ga nai" (it can't be helped) were used as daily mantras to get entire families through the ordeal with silent determination. It took more than 40 years before widespread acknowledgment that internment was a horrible mistake forced an apology out of the US government." - tooken from the article

i wouldn't say all asians as a group but yea majority of them run from racism
most asians usually don't complain or bring attention because of the fobby ideas that are stukc with them

fobby (adj.) - when an asian is too attached to their traditional ideas and values, most fobby people are ignorant to other cultures and refuse to open up to new ways

just give it time and i'm sure the asians that were raised in america will trip over racist shit like that

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Unread post by Lonewolf » July 23rd, 2005, 10:12 pm

Stereotypes don't just come out of nowhere. Many times there is some truth to it.
I'm not saying that it is correct to stereotype anyone, and much of it, is born out of racism and ignorance. However, a lot of the time, what happens is that, another race is quick to see certain things, such as, features, accents, mannerisms, attitudes, or whathaveyou. And the stereotypers build on that, even though the people who are being stereotyped, are not as quick to recognize it themselves, or view themselves in such a light.
A lot of lack of respect goes in stereotyping, no doubt. And there are positives and negatives in all races, but I do feel that we sometimes get all worked up, to the extent of reversing the stereotyping act, and fall into the same mistake, becoming just as guilty as the other person or race.
Many times the stereotyping is not necessarily evil minded, but because most of us are all prone to stereotyping others just the same, we become just as guilty as those we feel are offending us.
Differences are good, and differences don't necessarily mean that I have to like you or your ways, but do realize that I like myself as is, just like you like yourself as you are. And since you ain't never going to get me to drop all my clothing to put on yours, then toe the line and learn to recognize when someone is throwing something at you with disrespect, than when they're just being ignorant about your feelings on the matter, and/or them being frank on how they see it through their eyes.

If you are going to hold everyone not of your race, accountable for the evilness of others in their race, then surely you yourself will never be free from that same evilness.
I dare say that some stereotyping is beneficial and positive.
THINK ON IT A LITTLE.

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Unread post by Common Sense » July 25th, 2005, 5:15 pm

Interesting black stereotype cartoon (1940's) posted by 100 on the Mexico/Stamp thread.
viewtopic.php?t=7946&postdays=0&postorder=asc&start=140

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Unread post by 100 » July 25th, 2005, 7:14 pm

Common Sense wrote:Interesting black stereotype cartoon (1940's) posted by 100 on the Mexico/Stamp thread.
viewtopic.php?t=7946&postdays=0&postorder=asc&start=140

THAT WAS SOMETHING I PUT TOGETHER USING MICROSOFT PAINT I JUST COPIED AND PASTE IT BELIVE ME THERE ARE MANY MANY MORE AND I EVEN SEEN ONE ABOUT A MEXICAN PERSON THAT AINT A VICTORIOUS RAT OR A DOG-SPEAKING SPANISH AND LOVE GORDITAS. OF THAT DOG? IF IT WAS OFFENSIVE WHY WERE THERE MANY LATINOS GLORIFYING THE DOG IN VIDEOS, COMMERICALS AND AWARD SHOWS?

AND I SEE A FEW WITH CHIUAHUAHS(SPELLING)

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Unread post by Common Sense » July 25th, 2005, 9:09 pm

100 wrote:IF IT WAS OFFENSIVE WHY WERE THERE MANY LATINOS GLORIFYING THE DOG IN VIDEOS, COMMERICALS AND AWARD SHOWS?
AND I SEE A FEW WITH CHIUAHUAHS(SPELLING)
HERE IS SOMETHING INTERESTING I FOUND.


Taco Bell Disrespects Latino Community Again
By Coral Lopez Marcelo and Adelina Anthony
KNIGHT RIDDER TRIBUNE

Taco Bell is undermining the Latino community - again. As if the use of a Spanish-talking dog to market pseudo-Mexican food was not insulting enough, now a major Spanish-language radio station in Los Angeles has played a voice-over commercial for Taco Bell that uses protest language as a marketing tool.

The commercial mocks the organizing of concerned citizens who yell "huelga, huelga," which means "strike, strike" in Spanish. The ad then goes on to say that people are protesting at Taco Bell because they want the best food for their children. By doing so, it is ridiculing the real-life plight of many farm laborers.

Currently, the Coalition for Immokalee Workers, a community-based worker organization in Florida, is leading a national boycott against Taco Bell in hopes of eliminating the inhumane conditions of farm workers. The coalition is asking Taco Bell to pay its tomato distributor an additional penny for every pound it buys.

This one-cent raise would mean an increase in pay for farm laborers in Florida who work seven days a week for less than $7,500 a year. Aside from this sub-living wage, they get no health-care benefits, no sick-leave days and no overtime pay, and they're not afforded the right to organize.

The cost to the public, according to the coalition, would be only one-fourth of a cent more per chalupa they purchase. Although the boycott is now in its 20th month and has garnered the support of thousands throughout the nation, Taco Bell has yet to make efforts toward meeting the demands of these workers. They are not only being ignored; they are also being ridiculed by Taco Bell's choice of marketing.

The radio commercial belittles the Latino community's history of struggle in this country. As the United Farm Workers showed during the Chicano movement in the '60s, protests, boycotts and strikes were effective measures to bring large corporations to the bargaining table. Now, Taco Bell is trying to co-opt that message.

The other group we need to hold accountable is our own Latino community. Sadly, Latino actors and radio stations that agree to participate and generate these kinds of commercials do so at the cost of their own community pride.

Ironically, Latino actors are indebted to the United Farm Workers struggle and the subsequent rise of El Teatro Campesino, which helped create a space for Latinos in the arts and entertainment business.

Consumers, distributors, actors and corporations all need to develop a consciousness about marketing strategies that compromise human dignity. If not, what's next? A parody of Dr. Martin Luther King's civil-rights speech: "I have a dream - to buy a chalupa"?

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Unread post by bakethacake » July 26th, 2005, 8:56 am

stereotypes is a bitch move by anyone sayin it.
its just another way to down a bunch of people and make yo ass look important like a wannabe Jesus.
Thats how religions keep church go-ers...they bash each other, same in politics.

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Unread post by 100 » July 26th, 2005, 10:14 am

Common Sense wrote:
100 wrote:IF IT WAS OFFENSIVE WHY WERE THERE MANY LATINOS GLORIFYING THE DOG IN VIDEOS, COMMERICALS AND AWARD SHOWS?
AND I SEE A FEW WITH CHIUAHUAHS(SPELLING)
HERE IS SOMETHING INTERESTING I FOUND.


Taco Bell Disrespects Latino Community Again
By Coral Lopez Marcelo and Adelina Anthony
KNIGHT RIDDER TRIBUNE

Taco Bell is undermining the Latino community - again. As if the use of a Spanish-talking dog to market pseudo-Mexican food was not insulting enough, now a major Spanish-language radio station in Los Angeles has played a voice-over commercial for Taco Bell that uses protest language as a marketing tool.

The commercial mocks the organizing of concerned citizens who yell "huelga, huelga," which means "strike, strike" in Spanish. The ad then goes on to say that people are protesting at Taco Bell because they want the best food for their children. By doing so, it is ridiculing the real-life plight of many farm laborers.

Currently, the Coalition for Immokalee Workers, a community-based worker organization in Florida, is leading a national boycott against Taco Bell in hopes of eliminating the inhumane conditions of farm workers. The coalition is asking Taco Bell to pay its tomato distributor an additional penny for every pound it buys.

This one-cent raise would mean an increase in pay for farm laborers in Florida who work seven days a week for less than $7,500 a year. Aside from this sub-living wage, they get no health-care benefits, no sick-leave days and no overtime pay, and they're not afforded the right to organize.

The cost to the public, according to the coalition, would be only one-fourth of a cent more per chalupa they purchase. Although the boycott is now in its 20th month and has garnered the support of thousands throughout the nation, Taco Bell has yet to make efforts toward meeting the demands of these workers. They are not only being ignored; they are also being ridiculed by Taco Bell's choice of marketing.

The radio commercial belittles the Latino community's history of struggle in this country. As the United Farm Workers showed during the Chicano movement in the '60s, protests, boycotts and strikes were effective measures to bring large corporations to the bargaining table. Now, Taco Bell is trying to co-opt that message.

The other group we need to hold accountable is our own Latino community. Sadly, Latino actors and radio stations that agree to participate and generate these kinds of commercials do so at the cost of their own community pride.

Ironically, Latino actors are indebted to the United Farm Workers struggle and the subsequent rise of El Teatro Campesino, which helped create a space for Latinos in the arts and entertainment business.

Consumers, distributors, actors and corporations all need to develop a consciousness about marketing strategies that compromise human dignity. If not, what's next? A parody of Dr. Martin Luther King's civil-rights speech: "I have a dream - to buy a chalupa"?

THIS COMMERCIAL MUST BE SHOWN ON THE WEST COAST ONLY THESE DAYS CAUSE I HAVE NOT SEEN THAT FUNNY AS COMMERCIAL IN YEARS(NO DISRESPECT BUT THEY MADE THAT DOG SOUND FUNNY THAT ONE COMMERCIAL WHERE HE WAS CRYING WHEN THEY WERE SINGING GORDITA, GORDITA.

BY THE WAY WHO WAS BEHIND THE DOGS VOICE?

Consumers, distributors, actors and corporations all need to develop a consciousness about marketing strategies that compromise human dignity. If not, what's next? A parody of Dr. Martin Luther King's civil-rights speech: "I have a dream - to buy a chalupa"?[/

WHY DO THEY ALWAYS BRING IN SOMETHING RELATED TO A BLACK PERSON THEY ALWAYS DO THIS SAME THING WITH MARK BELLING WHEN HE SAID WETBACKS SHOULD BE DEPOTED THEY CALLED HIM RACIST BUT IT AINT A RACIAL SLUR BUT THATS ANOTHER ARGUMENT.


The other group we need to hold accountable is our own Latino community. Sadly, Latino actors and radio stations that agree to participate and generate these kinds of commercials do so at the cost of their own community pride


WELL THATS A START SO THEY CAN BLAME NO ONE FOR THIS ESPECIALLY IF LATINOS CAME UP WITH THIS IDEA TO BEGIN WITH WHAT IF IT WAS A PERSON THAT WAS SAYING YO QUIERO TACO BELL WOULD IT BE ANY DIFFERENT?!


WHEN WAS THIS ARTICLE MADE AND WHEN WERE THIS COMMERICAIALS AIRED!

MiChuhSuh

Unread post by MiChuhSuh » August 5th, 2005, 3:07 pm

lonewolf wrote:Stereotypes don't just come out of nowhere. Many times there is some truth to it.
I'm not saying that it is correct to stereotype anyone, and much of it, is born out of racism and ignorance. However, a lot of the time, what happens is that, another race is quick to see certain things, such as, features, accents, mannerisms, attitudes, or whathaveyou. And the stereotypers build on that, even though the people who are being stereotyped, are not as quick to recognize it themselves, or view themselves in such a light.
A lot of lack of respect goes in stereotyping, no doubt. And there are positives and negatives in all races, but I do feel that we sometimes get all worked up, to the extent of reversing the stereotyping act, and fall into the same mistake, becoming just as guilty as the other person or race.
Many times the stereotyping is not necessarily evil minded, but because most of us are all prone to stereotyping others just the same, we become just as guilty as those we feel are offending us.
Differences are good, and differences don't necessarily mean that I have to like you or your ways, but do realize that I like myself as is, just like you like yourself as you are. And since you ain't never going to get me to drop all my clothing to put on yours, then toe the line and learn to recognize when someone is throwing something at you with disrespect, than when they're just being ignorant about your feelings on the matter, and/or them being frank on how they see it through their eyes.

If you are going to hold everyone not of your race, accountable for the evilness of others in their race, then surely you yourself will never be free from that same evilness.
I dare say that some stereotyping is beneficial and positive.
THINK ON IT A LITTLE.
You have valid points.

The Whole "OMG IM SO GANGSTA/THUGGEDOUT/GHETTO RAPSTAR" BS put out by IGNORANT RAPPERS IN THE MEDIA sure doesn't help.

I say that black grassroots organizations such as teh Urban League, and minority alliances such as the NAACP should stand up and condemn these knuckleheads for bringing negative stereotypes to their race and negatively influencing america by making it seem "cool" to commit crime.

I do however, agree with Ice Cube's view on WHY this gangsta rap thing is so popular, and respect his views. In in an interview in Charles Barkeley's book, Who's Afraid of the Big Black Man?, he responds and says that NWA blew up with not just ghetto children, but everyone because everyone has a sort of frustration and anger in them, regardless of how rich they are, everyone has issues that need to be vented. I was surprised by this interview and HIGHLY recommend this read.


However, there is a difference between feeling the music and thinking this is a representation of the African American culture, and BET and other media sure doesn't help. It's time for self identification and condemnation of anyone bringing their own race down.[/b]

MiChuhSuh

Unread post by MiChuhSuh » August 5th, 2005, 3:16 pm

End Violence NOW wrote:
lonewolf wrote:Stereotypes don't just come out of nowhere. Many times there is some truth to it.
I'm not saying that it is correct to stereotype anyone, and much of it, is born out of racism and ignorance. However, a lot of the time, what happens is that, another race is quick to see certain things, such as, features, accents, mannerisms, attitudes, or whathaveyou. And the stereotypers build on that, even though the people who are being stereotyped, are not as quick to recognize it themselves, or view themselves in such a light.
A lot of lack of respect goes in stereotyping, no doubt. And there are positives and negatives in all races, but I do feel that we sometimes get all worked up, to the extent of reversing the stereotyping act, and fall into the same mistake, becoming just as guilty as the other person or race.
Many times the stereotyping is not necessarily evil minded, but because most of us are all prone to stereotyping others just the same, we become just as guilty as those we feel are offending us.
Differences are good, and differences don't necessarily mean that I have to like you or your ways, but do realize that I like myself as is, just like you like yourself as you are. And since you ain't never going to get me to drop all my clothing to put on yours, then toe the line and learn to recognize when someone is throwing something at you with disrespect, than when they're just being ignorant about your feelings on the matter, and/or them being frank on how they see it through their eyes.

If you are going to hold everyone not of your race, accountable for the evilness of others in their race, then surely you yourself will never be free from that same evilness.
I dare say that some stereotyping is beneficial and positive.
THINK ON IT A LITTLE.
You have valid points.

The Whole "OMG IM SO GANGSTA/THUGGEDOUT/GHETTO RAPSTAR" BS put out by IGNORANT RAPPERS IN THE MEDIA sure doesn't help.

I say that black grassroots organizations such as teh Urban League, and minority alliances such as the NAACP should stand up and condemn these knuckleheads for bringing negative stereotypes to their race and negatively influencing america by making it seem "cool" to commit crime.

I do however, agree with Ice Cube's view on WHY this gangsta rap thing is so popular, and respect his views. In in an interview in Charles Barkeley's book, Who's Afraid of the Big Black Man?, he responds and says that NWA blew up with not just ghetto children, but everyone because everyone has a sort of frustration and anger in them, regardless of how rich they are, everyone has issues that need to be vented. I was surprised by this interview and HIGHLY recommend this read.


However, there is a difference between feeling the music and thinking this is a representation of the African American culture, and BET and other media sure doesn't help. It's time for self identification and condemnation of anyone bringing their own race down.[/b]
Ooops i accidentally quoted the wrong thing..... o well ignore the "You have a valid point" part then.


By the way, does ANYONE notice almost all commercials are using black actors? ESPECIALLY THOSE CORNY GAY ASS MC"DONALD"S COMMERCIALS WHICH HAD ALMOST NOTHING TO DO WITH FOOD?!?!?

I think this the exploitation of saturation in the media and pop culture that black = cool and that ghetto= cool

If you start paying attention watching Comicview on BET, you would see that almost all jokes are either "ahahhahaha it's cuz he's black get it ahahaha" or "ahahaha it;s cuz he white get it" or "Aahahha it's cuz he ghetto."

And whats up with pimps, gangsters, and hustlers being seen in such a positive light?

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Unread post by Individual » August 7th, 2005, 3:55 pm

Common Sense wrote:How do you feel about sport teams bearing the names of Native Americans, such as:

1. The Washington Redskins. Do you know what redskin means or where the word came from???

2. Cleavland Indians.
Natives got the name redskins from there skin

they use to rub this certain tree oil on there skin that would make them tan red..

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Unread post by Common Sense » August 8th, 2005, 12:34 am

Individual wrote:Natives got the name redskins from there skin
they use to rub this certain tree oil on there skin that would make them tan red..
I'm not sure about that Individual. I'll have to research that one. As far as I'm aware of, the term "Red Skin" is highly offensive to Native Americans. They also don't like Native Americans being used as mascots for sport teams. I posted below a letter I read a couple of years ago, written by a Native American in reference to this topic.

The Term Redskin

Dear Editor;

It was brought to my attention that some were asking if the term "redskin" was really offensive to Indians and that they would like to hear from us on this subject. Well, here you are...I am Blackfoot, Cherokee and Choctaw...and yes, the term is extremely offensive to me. Let me explain why. Back not so long ago, when there was a bounty on the heads of the Indian people...the trappers would bring in Indian scalps along with the other skins that they had managed to trap or shoot. These scalps brought varying prices as did the skins of the animals. The trappers would tell the trading post owner or whoever it was that he was dealing with, that he had 2 bearskins, a couple of beaver skins...and a few scalps. Well, the term "scalp" offended the good Christian women of the community and they asked that another term be found to describe these things. So, the trappers and hunters began using the term "redskin"...they would tell the owner that they had bearskin, deer skins....and "redskins." The term came from the bloody mess that one saw when looking at the scalp...thus the term "red"...skin because it was the "skin" of an "animal" just like the others that they had...so, it became "redskins". So, you see when we see or hear that term...we don't see a football team...we don't see a game being played...we don't see any "honor"...we see the bloody pieces of scalps that were hacked off of our men, women and even our children...we hear the screams as our people were killed...and "skinned" just like animals. So, yes, Mr./Ms. Editor...you can safely say that the term is considered extremely offensive.

In Struggle,
Tina H.
Mesa, Az.

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Unread post by Lefty » August 20th, 2005, 10:24 pm

Yea well i'm 100% italian and my #1 question is have i saw the godfather

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Unread post by Mraka » August 26th, 2005, 10:55 am

lonewolf wrote:Stereotypes don't just come out of nowhere. Many times there is some truth to it.
I'm not saying that it is correct to stereotype anyone, and much of it, is born out of racism and ignorance. However, a lot of the time, what happens is that, another race is quick to see certain things, such as, features, accents, mannerisms, attitudes, or whathaveyou. And the stereotypers build on that, even though the people who are being stereotyped, are not as quick to recognize it themselves, or view themselves in such a light.
A lot of lack of respect goes in stereotyping, no doubt. And there are positives and negatives in all races, but I do feel that we sometimes get all worked up, to the extent of reversing the stereotyping act, and fall into the same mistake, becoming just as guilty as the other person or race.
Many times the stereotyping is not necessarily evil minded, but because most of us are all prone to stereotyping others just the same, we become just as guilty as those we feel are offending us.
Differences are good, and differences don't necessarily mean that I have to like you or your ways, but do realize that I like myself as is, just like you like yourself as you are. And since you ain't never going to get me to drop all my clothing to put on yours, then toe the line and learn to recognize when someone is throwing something at you with disrespect, than when they're just being ignorant about your feelings on the matter, and/or them being frank on how they see it through their eyes.

If you are going to hold everyone not of your race, accountable for the evilness of others in their race, then surely you yourself will never be free from that same evilness.
I dare say that some stereotyping is beneficial and positive.
THINK ON IT A LITTLE.
You get your clue ,talking on somebodys back,always.If it is right or wrong ,it is still behind somebodys back.However you twist it...

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