Top Mexican drug lord killed in clash with army

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thewestside
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Top Mexican drug lord killed in clash with army

Unread post by thewestside » July 29th, 2010, 10:08 pm

Top Mexican drug lord killed in clash with army
By OLGA R. RODRIGUEZ
July 29, 2010


MEXICO CITY – One of the top three leaders of Mexico's most powerful drug cartel died in a gunfight with soldiers Thursday, ending the long run of a mysterious capo considered a founder of the country's massive methamphetamine trade.

The death of Ignacio "Nacho" Coronel near the city of Guadalajara is the biggest strike yet against the Sinaloa cartel led by Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman — Mexico's top drug lord — since President Felipe Calderon launched a military offensive against drug traffickers in late 2006.

According to the FBI, which offered a $5 million reward for the 56-year-old Coronel, he was believed to be "the forerunner in producing massive amounts of methamphetamine in clandestine laboratories in Mexico, then smuggling it into the U.S."

Gen. Edgar Luis Villegas said an army raid was closing in one of Coronel's safehouses in an upscale suburb of the western city of Guadalajara, when the drug lord opened fire on soldiers.

"Nacho Coronel tried to escape, and fired on military personnel, killing one soldier and wounding another," Villegas said at a news conference in Mexico City. "Responding to the attack, this 'capo' died."

Villegas said the raid "significantly affects the operational capacity and drug distribution of the organization run by Guzman."

Authorities say Guzman, No. 2 Ismael "El Mayo" Zambada and Coronel formed the top three capos in the Sinaloa cartel. Coronel allegedly controlled trafficking routes through the states of Jalisco, Colima and parts of Michoacan — known as the "Pacific route" for cocaine smuggling.

Coronel's downfall came amid persistent allegations that Calderon's administration appeared to be favoring the Sinaloa cartel, or not hitting it as hard as other drug gangs.

Those allegations have drawn angry denials from the president and his top law enforcement officials, who point to the 2009 arrest of Vicente "El Vicentillo" Zambada — the son of Ismael Zambada — as proof they were going after the gang.

Coronel's death is the biggest blow against Mexico's drug gangs since drug lord Arturo Beltran Leyva and six of his bodyguards were killed in a Dec. 16 raid by Mexican marines in the central city of Cuernavaca.

An FBI statement on Coronel's drug trafficking organization said that "the scope of its influence and operations penetrate throughout the United States, Mexico, and several other European, Central American, and South American countries."

During Thursday's raid, helicopters circled over the Guadalajara suburb of Zapopan, as soldiers appeared to search at least two homes. Soldiers arrested Francisco Quinonez Gastelum, alleged to be Coronel's right-hand man and the only associate allowed to accompany him to his mansion.

"Coronel used two homes as safe houses ... and employed the tactic of being accompanied only by Quinonez Gastelum, to keep a low profile and not draw attention to himself," Villegas said.

Coronel is one of Mexico's most mysterious drug lords.

On its web page of most wanted drug traffickers, the Mexican federal attorney general's has three photographs of Coronel and gives his nickname, "Nacho." There are only blanks after "age," "place of origin," and "personal characteristics."

The Mexican government has described Colonel has running his own criminal cell out of Zapopan. In 2006 raids on four Zapopan homes, federal police arrested five of Colonel's lieutenants and seized more than $2 million in cash, along with expensive watches and jewelry, but failed to find Coronel himself.

Coronel was born in the northern state of Durango, the home state of many of Mexico's drug traffickers and was groomed to be a drug lord from an early age.

He rose up under Amado Carrillo Fuentes, the so-called "Lord of the Skies" and leader of the Juarez drug cartel who died in 1997. After Carrillo's death, Coronel joined the Sinaloa cartel and rose through the ranks to become the cartel's No. 3.

Amid widespread violence on drug smuggling routes, the U.S. said it was closing its consulate in the border city of Ciudad Juarez pending a security review.

The U.S. Embassy announced the consulate will "remain closed until the security review is completed" and said it would reschedule appointments for visa applications. It did not say what prompted the review.

The decision came after a U.S. employee of the consulate, her husband and a Mexican tied to the consulate were killed March 13 when drug gang fired on their cars as they left a children's party in the city across from El Paso, Texas.

The U.S. State Department has taken several measures over the past months to protect consulate employees. It has authorized the departure of relatives of U.S. government employees in six northern Mexican cities. And starting July 15, U.S. government employees working away from the border were barred from crossing anywhere along Texas' border because of safety concerns.

A turf battle between the Juarez and Sinaloa cartels has made Ciudad Juarez one of the world's most dangerous cities. More than 4,000 people have been killed in the city of 1.3 million since the beginning of 2009.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/lt_drug_war_mexico

RDRIGN
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Re: Top Mexican drug lord killed in clash with army

Unread post by RDRIGN » July 30th, 2010, 3:23 am

Wow yeah I heard about this 7 hours ago westside, allegedly the Zetas informed the Mexican military about his hideout. 16 Zetas died hours ago because of Nacho's Coronel's death, some people say that Nacho tried to form his own group with the cartel of Valencia against El Chapo, Mayo and Azul but who knows. The death of Coronel is a big blow to the Sinaloa Cartel he was one of the untouchables damn I can't believe he is dead. There are still 7 or 8 top leaders, I wonder who is going to take his place. Coronel was one of the most respected bosses of the Sinaloa Federation.

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Re: Top Mexican drug lord killed in clash with army

Unread post by RDRIGN » July 30th, 2010, 3:33 am

It was most probably because of the kidnapping Mexican government elite Diego Fernandez de Cevellos which is one of the elites of elites in Mexican government. He was kidnapped and hold for ransom for 50 million dollars and somehow the kidnappers knew that the elites in Mexico had chips and they took it out. Diego Fernandez de Cevallos is a dead man right now most probably.

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Re: Top Mexican drug lord killed in clash with army

Unread post by mnjmc » July 30th, 2010, 3:46 am

RDRIGN wrote:Wow yeah I heard about this 7 hours ago westside, allegedly the Zetas informed the Mexican military about his hideout. 16 Zetas died hours ago because of Nacho's Coronel's death, some people say that Nacho tried to form his own group with the cartel of Valencia against El Chapo, Mayo and Azul but who knows. The death of Coronel is a big blow to the Sinaloa Cartel he was one of the untouchables damn I can't believe he is dead. There are still 7 or 8 top leaders, I wonder who is going to take his place. Coronel was one of the most respected bosses of the Sinaloa Federation.

Nacho Coronel was at war with the Valencias, the Valencias put out signs declaring war against him and accusing Nacho of setting up one of their family members, they were not trying to come together to the Sinaloans. And from my understanding Chapo is very freindly with the Valencia Family.

And the Zetas don't have enough pull in Jalisco to set people up, the Z's are in Jalisco but they are not strong in that state. And lastly, every one knew more or less where Nacho lived, did you see pictures in the freaking big ass house he was in when he got killed, guys like Nacho don't hide out they buy off governors and generals. I don't believe for one second that a guy like Nacho was the type to go out shooting, to me Nacho was executed.

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Re: Top Mexican drug lord killed in clash with army

Unread post by RDRIGN » July 30th, 2010, 2:25 pm

Nacho Coronel tried to leave the Sinaloa Cartel Federation and set up his own independent group according to Al Rojo Vivo spanish news, have you noticed all the kingpins that tried to leave the Sinaloa Cartel Federation ended up dead months dead. It happened to the Arturo Beltran Leyva brothers and now Nacho Coronel, it's becoming really obvious that El Chapo and Mayo are behind this, this war between the cartels themselves and the government is becoming really fishy. At the beginning the Mexican government hid it more but now it's obvious the Mexican government is helping out the Sinaloa Federation Cartel destroy the other cartels and killing the kingpings that are trying to leave their own independent cartel. The Mexican military went to Nacho's house to execute him, they didn't go there to capture him. This is a really clear message the Sinaloa Cartel Federation/Mexican government made towards the other cartels and the Mexican people. It's official the gloves are off now.

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