NY crip history

Discuss gangs in the Northeast section of the US in the following states; Connecticut, Delaware, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island & Vermont.
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NY crip history

Unread post by *deepsky* » July 3rd, 2005, 7:07 pm

i keep hearin all this history shit bout some Cat named macc an dem bloods an shit,but im sayin,i neva really heard that history of locc's in the eastCoast,how shit got craccin on the east,i neva cale cross hwo or how it jumped off.

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Unread post by Individual » July 4th, 2005, 12:19 am

some foo named Og Mack saw the movie Colors..and read shit on the net about L.A gangs and decided to start a L.A gang in New York

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Unread post by *deepsky* » July 4th, 2005, 9:02 am

Individual wrote:some foo named Og Mack saw the movie Colors..and read shit on the net about L.A gangs and decided to start a L.A gang in New York
yea i know,dats macc,he started the blood shit in NY,but im talkin bout the blue side,who started the crip nation on the eastCoast,who brought it there and how?

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Unread post by LcBwC » July 4th, 2005, 6:52 pm

DO MOST OF THE NEW YORK SETS RUN OFF HISTORY OR FOLK KNOWLEDGE?

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Unread post by kg_loco1 » July 5th, 2005, 9:19 pm

man that question 2 broad fam depend on witch cet u talkin bout

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Unread post by Dr. Gonzo » July 5th, 2005, 9:28 pm

Do LA crips respect crips from other states?

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Unread post by kg_loco1 » July 5th, 2005, 9:31 pm

doess it really matter?

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Unread post by Dr. Gonzo » July 5th, 2005, 9:35 pm

No just curious about what LA crips thought of people starting gangs and naming them after them.

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Unread post by bkstomp3 » July 5th, 2005, 10:29 pm

Dr. Gonzo wrote:Do LA crips respect crips from other states?


we dont give a fu.. about anything but whats goin on in the hood and down the street...in my opinion, im speakin for all crips i know...only time we'd care is if we go out there or somethin...cuz it ignoarnt niggaz out here that will diss them in a min then theres the coo ones that will be like whatever.i hope that answer yo question homie.

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Unread post by *deepsky* » July 6th, 2005, 12:06 am

Dr. Gonzo wrote:No just curious about what LA crips thought of people starting gangs and naming them after them.
well im in flroida now,an jus about half the niggas i roll with down here are from NY,g-stones,so i dont care where a nigga from,if u bangin an u holdin shit down,then u Coo with me,long as u know ya shit an u on point

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Unread post by BG MLOCO » July 6th, 2005, 8:04 am

BK STOMP3 AND DEEPSKY GOOD POST, WELL MOST NYC SETS THAT WAS STARTED IN NYC SUM FOLLOW UNDER FOLK KNOWLEDGE AND THE 6 POINT STAR SHIT( SETS LIKE G-STONE, SOME 823 SETS NOT ALL, AND EGC,) WELL SETS THAT HAVE CALI ROOTS LIKE MINE ETG, 55NHC AND MOST 5SC AND RTC OHC DONT GO BY THE FOLK STUFF, WE GO BY WHAT OUR OG'S TAUGHT US AND WHAT WE HAVE LEARNED FROM THEM , ALOT OF SETS IN NYC HOT CALI ROOTS, ALOT OF LA OG'S CAME OUT HERE SET UP SHOP AND NIGGAZ GOT DOWN AND ESTABLISHED SO YEA ALOT OF REAL C'S OUT HERE.

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Unread post by zip3ace » July 26th, 2005, 7:02 am

Man! Dont nobody know how them ni99az started in NY. They didnt start like how the Bloods started. Bloods started as one nation with many sets. crips started as individual gangs... thats why them ni99az always beefing with each other kuz every kouple of months a new set would pop up. There used to be sets like Killa crips, united gangsta crips, cameleon crips, blue diamond crips, haitian mafis crips... it seemed like ni99az was just going to sleep neutral and waking up crip. So then all them new breed sets was getting into konflict with bigger sets like 823. Kuz for one, nobody knew where they kame from and 2) them new breeds was getting ran over by enemies, making the sets that put in work look bad. So then madd sets was getting smashed. Only 823 and ugc got a NY History of how they started and why they started. All these other crip sets popped up kuz of the east v. west shit. NY crip ni99az that were getting labeled as fake by other NY sets aint want to be labeled as fake so they hopped on to sets that had kali roots. Back in the day, it was only ny-bred crip sets... 823, kc1, etc.

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Unread post by Cold Bear » July 26th, 2005, 8:47 am

I live around a lot of UGC; so your saying thats considered a legit set with a legit history? What is the history of UGC and they use another number like 842 or some shit but whattup with those numbers? If you don't want to break it down on the net, fine.

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Unread post by zip3ace » July 26th, 2005, 11:05 am

Cold Bear wrote:I live around a lot of UGC; so your saying thats considered a legit set with a legit history? What is the history of UGC and they use another number like 842 or some shit but whattup with those numbers? If you don't want to break it down on the net, fine.


the phone number

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Unread post by Q » July 26th, 2005, 11:15 am

zip3ace wrote:Man! Dont nobody know how them guys started in NY. They didnt start like how the Bloods started. Bloods started as one nation with many sets. crips started as individual gangs... thats why them guys always beefing with each other kuz every kouple of months a new set would pop up. There used to be sets like Killa crips, united gangsta crips, cameleon crips, blue diamond crips, haitian mafis crips... it seemed like guys was just going to sleep neutral and waking up crip. So then all them new breed sets was getting into konflict with bigger sets like 823. Kuz for one, nobody knew where they kame from and 2) them new breeds was getting ran over by enemies, making the sets that put in work look bad. So then madd sets was getting smashed. Only 823 and ugc got a NY History of how they started and why they started. All these other crip sets popped up kuz of the east v. west shit. NY crip guys that were getting labeled as fake by other NY sets aint want to be labeled as fake so they hopped on to sets that had kali roots. Back in the day, it was only ny-bred crip sets... 823, kc1, etc.


homie kc 1 is a cali set. dey just switched dey name. dont speak on it if u dont know what u talkin bout cuzzin. das how shit get twisted dey, eastside kitchen crips. 4 wuteva stupid reason dey switched dey name over hea.

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Unread post by Q » July 26th, 2005, 11:20 am

Cold Bear wrote:I live around a lot of UGC; so your saying thats considered a legit set with a legit history? What is the history of UGC and they use another number like 842 or some shit but whattup with those numbers? If you don't want to break it down on the net, fine.


if u live around them and want to know ask them. not sum blood nigga who dont know bout the nyC"s

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Unread post by Cold Bear » July 26th, 2005, 11:59 am

I hear that homie but I'm a little too old to be running up on these fools asking them all kinds of questions about their codes. Basically I don't look like a typical NY motherfucker in the first place, plus I only lived there for but a year. only when the topic comes up, like in this thread, would I ask.

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Unread post by Cold Bear » July 26th, 2005, 12:38 pm

to Zip I don't have a land line so I didn't know that, but good look.

To add on that month to month it's different with who's around and what I see, so I'm trying to understand the long term history you feel me.

Most old West Indians and Puerto Ricans around the way i talk to just say it used to be crazy, but not much else. Like I said, if you don't want to speak on the shit over the net, by all means don't.

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Unread post by lb516 » July 26th, 2005, 1:44 pm

For three months last year, Larry Pagett agonized about going to prison. As the avowed Crips gang leader and aspiring rapper swaggered drunkenly one April morning into state supreme court in Brooklyn to seal a plea bargain deal for assault with a gun, he reminisced about the blustery winter night he bumped into his old dawg, Patrick Dorismond.

Pagett and Dorismond, the son of Haitian singer Andre Dorismond, became close friends in 1996 when Pagett, in his early teens, already was deeply entrenched in hardcore thug life. Pagett, now 20, was the head gangsta in G-Storm, a Flatbush-based set with strong ties to the Crips. But it was Dorismond, a burly figure nicknamed "Avalanche," who befriended Pagett after learning of Pagett's gang affiliation and his cultural roots in Belize. In the early 1980s, Dorismond was a member of the U.K. Crew, a forerunner to groups like Killa Gangsta Crips. "It was based on Crips," recalls Pagett. "It was a little set. But by the time I met Avalanche, he was already calmed down. He was into some music shit."

Dorismond was an underground hip hop deejay who coined the phrase "Haitian Hop" while playing at the Caribbean Dome in Brooklyn. "He had the whole party talking Haitian. He used to say, 'Everybody say, 'Sak pasé [What's up]?' He was like a comedian, man," says Pagett. "He used to be buggin'. We'd be chillin', we'd all be talkin', and he'd just make an outburst, say some Haitian shit that had everybody laughin'. This is the same nigga whose mother used to call him out from her window, 'Patrick!' while we hangin' an' shit."



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Young wannabes like Pagett drew inspiration from movies and music videos about the Crips, Bloods, and other gangs in cities like Chicago.


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As they talked that night last February, Dorismond told Pagett he no longer hung out in the streets. "I'm turnin' ma life around," he said in a sleepy ebonicized drawl. "I work now. I got ma own crib, and me and ma girl about to git married. I got ma li'l seed, ma li'l daughter." Dorismond was 26 and working as a security guard with the Times Square Business Improvement District. Pagett wanted Dorismond to know that he too was at the crossroads in his life and was trying to make it as a hip hop artist. Pagett bragged about his rap group Brooknam Dodger—made up of "Me, that Biz Loc, ma man Omega, ma man Relapse, and ma man Flatbush"—which was shooting a music video for their first single, "Brooklyn," in which Pagett goes off "on some gangsta shit."

Then Pagett told Dorismond he'd done something really criminal—a stickup—but that he'd fessed up and cut a deal with the Brooklyn D.A. to keep from doing 15-to-life. His surrender and sentencing was set for April. Pagett asked the Haitian immigrant what he should do. "He was mad at me 'cause I was gonna turn myself in," Pagett remembers. "He wanted me to run. He begged me to go to L.A. or somethin'." It was the last time Pagett saw Dorismond.

On the night of March 16, during a break in the filming of the "Brooklyn" video, someone told Pagett, "Avalanche got kilt; the police kilt him." Dorismond had been fatally shot during a scuffle with an undercover police officer as he left a nightclub in Times Square. The officer had approached Dorismond as part of a drug sting and asked if he would sell him marijuana. Dorismond rebuffed him, a struggle ensued, backup officers arrived, and one officer's gun went off, killing Dorismond. It was the fourth shooting of an unarmed black civilian by undercover officers in the city in 13 months, and it occurred only a few weeks after an Albany jury acquitted four white undercover officers in the shooting of Amadou Diallo, who died in a hail of 41 bullets. There is a bitter irony to the shooting that haunts Pagett. He remembers Dorismond saying shortly after Diallo had died, "You don't wanna catch 41."

Today Pagett imagines himself being stopped by a cop. Although the hypothetical scenario is about the wrong the officer has done to him, Pagett's true fantasy is about him avenging "the murdah" of Patrick Dorismond. "Man, if I got a gun on me and police confront me, I'd just let off, man," he says. "It goes like this: You get searched, police pull their gun, you back up and touch 'em and suddenly it's justifiable homicide. You know what I mean? You had a gun on you and you reached for it. But you really didn't have no gun. I would run and make sure I can get it off on you or somethin'. I'm sayin' that it's either kill or be killed on the streets—to hell with them dudes."

Pagett's anxiety builds when the sentencing is delayed for another four hours. "Oh, Lord," he sighs. He'd stayed up the night before reshooting some scenes for "Brooklyn," and gotten bombed on Hennessy cognac, his favorite liquor high, as the hour of his surrender drew closer. "I was just drinkin'," he says slouching on a bench outside of the courtroom. "I think that's what got me here right now. I drank some this morning, too. I'm just tryin' to enjoy what's left of the freedom I agreed to give up. Shit, I did the crime."



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Larry Pagett's crime started out as a robbery around 2:30 a.m. on May 22, 1999, outside of the Trinity nightclub at the corner of Clarkson and New York avenues in Flatbush. According to court papers, Pagett pounced on Ravon Andrew and Gary James. The gangsta rapper stuck a .357 Magnum in James's back and announced, "Give me your shit!" He then yanked a $700 gold chain from James's neck and began to run.

"I didn't know who it was, whose chain I took," Pagett recalled in a handwritten statement he would later give to detectives from the 67th Precinct station house. "I didn't know that I knew the guy and the guy knew me. When I was running and they were chasing me, is when I realized I knew the guy, and I threw back the chain. I was drunk and was bugging out and thought they were coming to kill me. Everything was like one big rush because I drank a whole big thing of Hennessy. I didn't have the gun that long, maybe only a week. I really don't want to say where I got it. I didn't know someone got shot. I didn't really bust shots to hit anyone. I was really only busting shots in the air to scare the people who were chasing me. I knew they knew me because just before I bust the shots I heard them calling me. They were calling, 'Biz! Biz!' They were people I used to hang with back in the days."

One of two rounds Pagett had fired hit bystander Jorge Cuebas in an arm. Pagett ditched the gun as he fled. He was arrested shortly after at the corner of Linden Boulevard and New York Avenue. A grand jury indicted Pagett on several charges, including attempted murder, robbery, grand larceny, criminal possession of a weapon, assault, reckless endangerment, menacing, petty larceny, and criminal possession of stolen property. "Right now, I'm about to go do five years, nigga," says Pagett resignedly, referring to the sweetheart deal that former Abner Louima attorney Carl W. Thomas had negotiated for him. "I feel messed up, just wanna git it over with so I can get back in the world an' git ma money, man."



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The gangsta world lured Larry Pagett when he was only 12 and was bouncing back and forth between his mother, who lived in New York City, and his father, who resided in Los Angeles. In L.A., Pagett lived in South Central, which was known as America's gangsta capital. Home was a single-family house at the corner of West 81st Street and Normandie Avenue in a depressed working-class area under the control of the Crips gang. The 'hood erupted almost daily in turf wars triggered by druglords in the rival Bloods gang, who are as numerous as the Crips, but more powerful and more central to L.A.'s soaring crime problem. Young wannabes like Pagett drew inspiration from movies and music videos about the Crips, Bloods, and other gangs in cities like Chicago. "I was livin' with ma pops, ma cousins, ma uncles and aunts," he says fondly. "Ma whole family Crip'. All ma li'l cousins Crip'. All ma big cousins Crip'."

But a desperate Myrna Pagett, an immigrant from Belize, wanted to keep her son away from the Crips—the people who'd brainwashed him into thinking that they were his true blood, his real "family." When Pagett turned 13 in 1991, she snatched him from his South Central "family" and brought him back to live with her in Flatbush. Pagett landed in the midst of an immigrant middle-class neighborhood that was going through its own changes, nurtured by social conditions and police indifference. In Flatbush, youngsters like Pagett were even more dazzled by jewelry, cars, and fat cat crack dealers. At the time Pagett returned to Brooklyn, the Crips and Bloods were still an L.A. phenomenon. Then some Bloods sets began forming inside the Rikers Island jail system. In Flatbush, Pagett was disturbed by media reports of Crips and Bloods engaged in drug enterprises and other criminal alliances. "In New York, I'd heard about Bloods and Crips hangin' with each other, but it ain't supposed to be like that, it should be like when [the rivalry] first jumped off." Pagett, who vowed to show these amateurs "what gangsta is about," became a Crips pioneer of sorts in Brooklyn. (Some of Pagett's "family" from Belize already had established Crips affiliated gangs like Harlem Mafia and Roaming '30s in Harlem.) He went into Brownsville and recruited some street toughs who later took on monikers such as Pana Loc, Excite Bike, Frenzy, Nut Loc, Franzy Face Loc, and Burger. They called themselves Eight Deuce Tray, but as the gang began to expand they became known as G-Storm, then Eight Tray Killa Gangsta Crips, and later as Killa Gangsta Crips. "It was only right," Pagett says. "Ya couldn't just come and do what the Bloods do. We showed them what it is."



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The Killa Gangsta Crips claimed most of Brownsville and parts of Flatbush as their territory, on which no Bloods ventured. Pagett, who says he has a nose for Bloods, smelled one in a youngster who called himself Bishop after the serial killer character played by Tupac Shakur in the movie Juice. "He thought he was Tupac," says Pagett. "He looked like Tupac, rhyme like Tupac when he rappin'. Everything he write sounds like Tupac. I found out he used to come through our 'hood on some Juice shit." In late December 1998, Bishop rolled into the Vandeveer housing development, a Crips-controlled zone, wearing red, his gang color. Pagett wasn't, as he put it, "feelin' " this intrusion and confronted Bishop. "What up? What's going on?" he asked the stranger. "You Blood. I'm Crip. What up? You can't be Blood. This ma 'hood. You can't be all that."

"Nah, I ain't," Bishop said, hurriedly, adding that he had left the Bloods and was now "a God-body." According to Pagett, "I let him slide 'cause he denied his colors." As they talked, Bishop told Pagett he had just gotten out of jail and knew Pagett's cousin Loco, a Killa Gangsta Crip. "Him and ma cousin was into robbin'," Pagett claims. Pagett broke his Crips oath about associating with Bloods and hooked up with Bishop. Since Pagett "had the block" he would "hit Bishop off with a little product so he could get some money." But Bishop, Pagett claims, began to blow his own cocaine, and one day the two gangstas argued: It was "this nigga talkin' Crip', and this nigga talkin' Blood'."

In July 1999, Bishop brought the serial-killer character into reality. "He just stepped out on some Tupac shit, just like in the movie, and just killed ma cousin and went down the next block and killed the next dude. Two people in one night. Twenty minutes apart. He imitated Tupac. The Tupac thing, tryin' to make a statement." After the shooting and his arrest, Bishop in an alleged confession, told police, "Yo, man, Biz wanna kill me. That's why I did it."

During one of his courtroom appearances for a hearing on the robbery outside of the Trinity nightclub, Pagett saw Bishop as he was led in handcuffs before the same judge. "I was about to lose it in there," Pagett recalls. "Now, he sending messages to me saying ma cuz was his boy. He didn't mean to do it."



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Larry Pagett sat up and declared that if only Loco had his attitude about assuming responsibility for one's criminal behavior, perhaps he would be alive today. He had told his cousin that if an old-school rapper like Slick Rick could do time in prison, then come out and turn his life around, so could he. According to Pagett, Loco, who "owed the system three years" on a gun conviction, planned to jump bail and return to his native Belize. "He said he was going to leave 'cause he didn't have nothin' to look forward to," Pagett says. "He wasn't gonna turn himself in like me."

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Unread post by lb516 » July 26th, 2005, 1:46 pm

For three months last year, Larry Pagett agonized about going to prison. As the avowed Crips gang leader and aspiring rapper swaggered drunkenly one April morning into state supreme court in Brooklyn to seal a plea bargain deal for assault with a gun, he reminisced about the blustery winter night he bumped into his old dawg, Patrick Dorismond.

Pagett and Dorismond, the son of Haitian singer Andre Dorismond, became close friends in 1996 when Pagett, in his early teens, already was deeply entrenched in hardcore thug life. Pagett, now 20, was the head gangsta in G-Storm, a Flatbush-based set with strong ties to the Crips. But it was Dorismond, a burly figure nicknamed "Avalanche," who befriended Pagett after learning of Pagett's gang affiliation and his cultural roots in Belize. In the early 1980s, Dorismond was a member of the U.K. Crew, a forerunner to groups like Killa Gangsta Crips. "It was based on Crips," recalls Pagett. "It was a little set. But by the time I met Avalanche, he was already calmed down. He was into some music shit."

Dorismond was an underground hip hop deejay who coined the phrase "Haitian Hop" while playing at the Caribbean Dome in Brooklyn. "He had the whole party talking Haitian. He used to say, 'Everybody say, 'Sak pasé [What's up]?' He was like a comedian, man," says Pagett. "He used to be buggin'. We'd be chillin', we'd all be talkin', and he'd just make an outburst, say some Haitian shit that had everybody laughin'. This is the same nigga whose mother used to call him out from her window, 'Patrick!' while we hangin' an' shit."



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Young wannabes like Pagett drew inspiration from movies and music videos about the Crips, Bloods, and other gangs in cities like Chicago.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

As they talked that night last February, Dorismond told Pagett he no longer hung out in the streets. "I'm turnin' ma life around," he said in a sleepy ebonicized drawl. "I work now. I got ma own crib, and me and ma girl about to git married. I got ma li'l seed, ma li'l daughter." Dorismond was 26 and working as a security guard with the Times Square Business Improvement District. Pagett wanted Dorismond to know that he too was at the crossroads in his life and was trying to make it as a hip hop artist. Pagett bragged about his rap group Brooknam Dodger—made up of "Me, that Biz Loc, ma man Omega, ma man Relapse, and ma man Flatbush"—which was shooting a music video for their first single, "Brooklyn," in which Pagett goes off "on some gangsta shit."

Then Pagett told Dorismond he'd done something really criminal—a stickup—but that he'd fessed up and cut a deal with the Brooklyn D.A. to keep from doing 15-to-life. His surrender and sentencing was set for April. Pagett asked the Haitian immigrant what he should do. "He was mad at me 'cause I was gonna turn myself in," Pagett remembers. "He wanted me to run. He begged me to go to L.A. or somethin'." It was the last time Pagett saw Dorismond.

On the night of March 16, during a break in the filming of the "Brooklyn" video, someone told Pagett, "Avalanche got kilt; the police kilt him." Dorismond had been fatally shot during a scuffle with an undercover police officer as he left a nightclub in Times Square. The officer had approached Dorismond as part of a drug sting and asked if he would sell him marijuana. Dorismond rebuffed him, a struggle ensued, backup officers arrived, and one officer's gun went off, killing Dorismond. It was the fourth shooting of an unarmed black civilian by undercover officers in the city in 13 months, and it occurred only a few weeks after an Albany jury acquitted four white undercover officers in the shooting of Amadou Diallo, who died in a hail of 41 bullets. There is a bitter irony to the shooting that haunts Pagett. He remembers Dorismond saying shortly after Diallo had died, "You don't wanna catch 41."

Today Pagett imagines himself being stopped by a cop. Although the hypothetical scenario is about the wrong the officer has done to him, Pagett's true fantasy is about him avenging "the murdah" of Patrick Dorismond. "Man, if I got a gun on me and police confront me, I'd just let off, man," he says. "It goes like this: You get searched, police pull their gun, you back up and touch 'em and suddenly it's justifiable homicide. You know what I mean? You had a gun on you and you reached for it. But you really didn't have no gun. I would run and make sure I can get it off on you or somethin'. I'm sayin' that it's either kill or be killed on the streets—to hell with them dudes."

Pagett's anxiety builds when the sentencing is delayed for another four hours. "Oh, Lord," he sighs. He'd stayed up the night before reshooting some scenes for "Brooklyn," and gotten bombed on Hennessy cognac, his favorite liquor high, as the hour of his surrender drew closer. "I was just drinkin'," he says slouching on a bench outside of the courtroom. "I think that's what got me here right now. I drank some this morning, too. I'm just tryin' to enjoy what's left of the freedom I agreed to give up. Shit, I did the crime."



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Larry Pagett's crime started out as a robbery around 2:30 a.m. on May 22, 1999, outside of the Trinity nightclub at the corner of Clarkson and New York avenues in Flatbush. According to court papers, Pagett pounced on Ravon Andrew and Gary James. The gangsta rapper stuck a .357 Magnum in James's back and announced, "Give me your shit!" He then yanked a $700 gold chain from James's neck and began to run.

"I didn't know who it was, whose chain I took," Pagett recalled in a handwritten statement he would later give to detectives from the 67th Precinct station house. "I didn't know that I knew the guy and the guy knew me. When I was running and they were chasing me, is when I realized I knew the guy, and I threw back the chain. I was drunk and was bugging out and thought they were coming to kill me. Everything was like one big rush because I drank a whole big thing of Hennessy. I didn't have the gun that long, maybe only a week. I really don't want to say where I got it. I didn't know someone got shot. I didn't really bust shots to hit anyone. I was really only busting shots in the air to scare the people who were chasing me. I knew they knew me because just before I bust the shots I heard them calling me. They were calling, 'Biz! Biz!' They were people I used to hang with back in the days."

One of two rounds Pagett had fired hit bystander Jorge Cuebas in an arm. Pagett ditched the gun as he fled. He was arrested shortly after at the corner of Linden Boulevard and New York Avenue. A grand jury indicted Pagett on several charges, including attempted murder, robbery, grand larceny, criminal possession of a weapon, assault, reckless endangerment, menacing, petty larceny, and criminal possession of stolen property. "Right now, I'm about to go do five years, nigga," says Pagett resignedly, referring to the sweetheart deal that former Abner Louima attorney Carl W. Thomas had negotiated for him. "I feel messed up, just wanna git it over with so I can get back in the world an' git ma money, man."



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The gangsta world lured Larry Pagett when he was only 12 and was bouncing back and forth between his mother, who lived in New York City, and his father, who resided in Los Angeles. In L.A., Pagett lived in South Central, which was known as America's gangsta capital. Home was a single-family house at the corner of West 81st Street and Normandie Avenue in a depressed working-class area under the control of the Crips gang. The 'hood erupted almost daily in turf wars triggered by druglords in the rival Bloods gang, who are as numerous as the Crips, but more powerful and more central to L.A.'s soaring crime problem. Young wannabes like Pagett drew inspiration from movies and music videos about the Crips, Bloods, and other gangs in cities like Chicago. "I was livin' with ma pops, ma cousins, ma uncles and aunts," he says fondly. "Ma whole family Crip'. All ma li'l cousins Crip'. All ma big cousins Crip'."

But a desperate Myrna Pagett, an immigrant from Belize, wanted to keep her son away from the Crips—the people who'd brainwashed him into thinking that they were his true blood, his real "family." When Pagett turned 13 in 1991, she snatched him from his South Central "family" and brought him back to live with her in Flatbush. Pagett landed in the midst of an immigrant middle-class neighborhood that was going through its own changes, nurtured by social conditions and police indifference. In Flatbush, youngsters like Pagett were even more dazzled by jewelry, cars, and fat cat crack dealers. At the time Pagett returned to Brooklyn, the Crips and Bloods were still an L.A. phenomenon. Then some Bloods sets began forming inside the Rikers Island jail system. In Flatbush, Pagett was disturbed by media reports of Crips and Bloods engaged in drug enterprises and other criminal alliances. "In New York, I'd heard about Bloods and Crips hangin' with each other, but it ain't supposed to be like that, it should be like when [the rivalry] first jumped off." Pagett, who vowed to show these amateurs "what gangsta is about," became a Crips pioneer of sorts in Brooklyn. (Some of Pagett's "family" from Belize already had established Crips affiliated gangs like Harlem Mafia and Rollin' '30s in Harlem.) He went into Brownsville and recruited some street toughs who later took on monikers such as Pana Loc, Excite Bike, Frenzy, Nut Loc, Franzy Face Loc, and Burger. They called themselves Eight Deuce Tray, but as the gang began to expand they became known as G-Storm, then Eight Tray Killa Gangsta Crips, and later as Killa Gangsta Crips. "It was only right," Pagett says. "Ya couldn't just come and do what the Bloods do. We showed them what it is."



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The Killa Gangsta Crips claimed most of Brownsville and parts of Flatbush as their territory, on which no Bloods ventured. Pagett, who says he has a nose for Bloods, smelled one in a youngster who called himself Bishop after the serial killer character played by Tupac Shakur in the movie Juice. "He thought he was Tupac," says Pagett. "He looked like Tupac, rhyme like Tupac when he rappin'. Everything he write sounds like Tupac. I found out he used to come through our 'hood on some Juice shit." In late December 1998, Bishop rolled into the Vandeveer housing development, a Crips-controlled zone, wearing red, his gang color. Pagett wasn't, as he put it, "feelin' " this intrusion and confronted Bishop. "What up? What's going on?" he asked the stranger. "You Blood. I'm Crip. What up? You can't be Blood. This ma 'hood. You can't be all that."

"Nah, I ain't," Bishop said, hurriedly, adding that he had left the Bloods and was now "a God-body." According to Pagett, "I let him slide 'cause he denied his colors." As they talked, Bishop told Pagett he had just gotten out of jail and knew Pagett's cousin Loco, a Killa Gangsta Crip. "Him and ma cousin was into robbin'," Pagett claims. Pagett broke his Crips oath about associating with Bloods and hooked up with Bishop. Since Pagett "had the block" he would "hit Bishop off with a little product so he could get some money." But Bishop, Pagett claims, began to blow his own cocaine, and one day the two gangstas argued: It was "this nigga talkin' Crip', and this nigga talkin' Blood'."

In July 1999, Bishop brought the serial-killer character into reality. "He just stepped out on some Tupac shit, just like in the movie, and just killed ma cousin and went down the next block and killed the next dude. Two people in one night. Twenty minutes apart. He imitated Tupac. The Tupac thing, tryin' to make a statement." After the shooting and his arrest, Bishop in an alleged confession, told police, "Yo, man, Biz wanna kill me. That's why I did it."

During one of his courtroom appearances for a hearing on the robbery outside of the Trinity nightclub, Pagett saw Bishop as he was led in handcuffs before the same judge. "I was about to lose it in there," Pagett recalls. "Now, he sending messages to me saying ma cuz was his boy. He didn't mean to do it."



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Larry Pagett sat up and declared that if only Loco had his attitude about assuming responsibility for one's criminal behavior, perhaps he would be alive today. He had told his cousin that if an old-school rapper like Slick Rick could do time in prison, then come out and turn his life around, so could he. According to Pagett, Loco, who "owed the system three years" on a gun conviction, planned to jump bail and return to his native Belize. "He said he was going to leave 'cause he didn't have nothin' to look forward to," Pagett says. "He wasn't gonna turn himself in like me."

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Unread post by BlueCadillaC167 » July 26th, 2005, 5:09 pm

That was a good read. I aint know thats how 823 started. Them niggas is hella deep now.

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Unread post by zip3ace » July 27th, 2005, 7:04 am

Q wrote:
zip3ace wrote:Man! Dont nobody know how them guys started in NY. They didnt start like how the Bloods started. Bloods started as one nation with many sets. crips started as individual gangs... thats why them guys always beefing with each other kuz every kouple of months a new set would pop up. There used to be sets like Killa crips, united gangsta crips, cameleon crips, blue diamond crips, haitian mafis crips... it seemed like guys was just going to sleep neutral and waking up crip. So then all them new breed sets was getting into konflict with bigger sets like 823. Kuz for one, nobody knew where they kame from and 2) them new breeds was getting ran over by enemies, making the sets that put in work look bad. So then madd sets was getting smashed. Only 823 and ugc got a NY History of how they started and why they started. All these other crip sets popped up kuz of the east v. west shit. NY crip guys that were getting labeled as fake by other NY sets aint want to be labeled as fake so they hopped on to sets that had kali roots. Back in the day, it was only ny-bred crip sets... 823, kc1, etc.


homie kc 1 is a cali set. dey just switched dey name. dont speak on it if u dont know what u talkin bout cuzzin. das how shit get twisted dey, eastside kitchen crips. 4 wuteva stupid reason dey switched dey name over hea.


so if they a kali set, why they rep the 6 and why they got smashed?

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Unread post by zip3ace » July 27th, 2005, 7:04 am

matter fact dont answer that.

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Unread post by Q » July 27th, 2005, 10:00 am

zip3ace wrote:
Q wrote:
zip3ace wrote:Man! Dont nobody know how them guys started in NY. They didnt start like how the Bloods started. Bloods started as one nation with many sets. crips started as individual gangs... thats why them guys always beefing with each other kuz every kouple of months a new set would pop up. There used to be sets like Killa crips, united gangsta crips, cameleon crips, blue diamond crips, haitian mafis crips... it seemed like guys was just going to sleep neutral and waking up crip. So then all them new breed sets was getting into konflict with bigger sets like 823. Kuz for one, nobody knew where they kame from and 2) them new breeds was getting ran over by enemies, making the sets that put in work look bad. So then madd sets was getting smashed. Only 823 and ugc got a NY History of how they started and why they started. All these other crip sets popped up kuz of the east v. west shit. NY crip guys that were getting labeled as fake by other NY sets aint want to be labeled as fake so they hopped on to sets that had kali roots. Back in the day, it was only ny-bred crip sets... 823, kc1, etc.


homie kc 1 is a cali set. dey just switched dey name. dont speak on it if u dont know what u talkin bout cuzzin. das how shit get twisted dey, eastside kitchen crips. 4 wuteva stupid reason dey switched dey name over hea.


so if they a kali set, why they rep the 6 and why they got smashed?


the same reason why all these bloods in nyc rep the 5 nigga. and kc 1 is not smashed dude.these niggas got a few deep spots . fucc is u talkin bout. speak on what u know homie, not what u think.

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Unread post by Q » July 27th, 2005, 10:02 am

zip3ace wrote:
Q wrote:
zip3ace wrote:Man! Dont nobody know how them guys started in NY. They didnt start like how the Bloods started. Bloods started as one nation with many sets. crips started as individual gangs... thats why them guys always beefing with each other kuz every kouple of months a new set would pop up. There used to be sets like Killa crips, united gangsta crips, cameleon crips, blue diamond crips, haitian mafis crips... it seemed like guys was just going to sleep neutral and waking up crip. So then all them new breed sets was getting into konflict with bigger sets like 823. Kuz for one, nobody knew where they kame from and 2) them new breeds was getting ran over by enemies, making the sets that put in work look bad. So then madd sets was getting smashed. Only 823 and ugc got a NY History of how they started and why they started. All these other crip sets popped up kuz of the east v. west shit. NY crip guys that were getting labeled as fake by other NY sets aint want to be labeled as fake so they hopped on to sets that had kali roots. Back in the day, it was only ny-bred crip sets... 823, kc1, etc.


homie kc 1 is a cali set. dey just switched dey name. dont speak on it if u dont know what u talkin bout cuzzin. das how shit get twisted dey, eastside kitchen crips. 4 wuteva stupid reason dey switched dey name over hea.


so if they a kali set, why they rep the 6 and why they got smashed?


cant believe u said that like u aint rep the 5 and most ya homies dont. niggas dont know shit das why dey rep it.

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Unread post by kg_loco1 » July 27th, 2005, 2:36 pm

Q wrote:
zip3ace wrote:
Q wrote:[quote="zip3ace"]Man! Dont nobody know how them guys started in NY. They didnt start like how the Bloods started. Bloods started as one nation with many sets. crips started as individual gangs... thats why them guys always beefing with each other kuz every kouple of months a new set would pop up. There used to be sets like Killa crips, united gangsta crips, cameleon crips, blue diamond crips, haitian mafis crips... it seemed like guys was just going to sleep neutral and waking up crip. So then all them new breed sets was getting into konflict with bigger sets like 823. Kuz for one, nobody knew where they kame from and 2) them new breeds was getting ran over by enemies, making the sets that put in work look bad. So then madd sets was getting smashed. Only 823 and ugc got a NY History of how they started and why they started. All these other crip sets popped up kuz of the east v. west shit. NY crip guys that were getting labeled as fake by other NY sets aint want to be labeled as fake so they hopped on to sets that had kali roots. Back in the day, it was only ny-bred crip sets... 823, kc1, etc.


homie kc 1 is a cali set. dey just switched dey name. dont speak on it if u dont know what u talkin bout cuzzin. das how shit get twisted dey, eastside kitchen crips. 4 wuteva stupid reason dey switched dey name over hea.


so if they a kali set, why they rep the 6 and why they got smashed?


cant believe u said that like u aint rep the 5 and most ya homies dont. niggas dont know shit das why dey rep it.[/quote]

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Unread post by kg_loco1 » July 27th, 2005, 2:41 pm

Q wrote:
zip3ace wrote:
Q wrote:[quote="zip3ace"]Man! Dont nobody know how them guys started in NY. They didnt start like how the Bloods started. Bloods started as one nation with many sets. crips started as individual gangs... thats why them guys always beefing with each other kuz every kouple of months a new set would pop up. There used to be sets like Killa crips, united gangsta crips, cameleon crips, blue diamond crips, haitian mafis crips... it seemed like guys was just going to sleep neutral and waking up crip. So then all them new breed sets was getting into konflict with bigger sets like 823. Kuz for one, nobody knew where they kame from and 2) them new breeds was getting ran over by enemies, making the sets that put in work look bad. So then madd sets was getting smashed. Only 823 and ugc got a NY History of how they started and why they started. All these other crip sets popped up kuz of the east v. west shit. NY crip guys that were getting labeled as fake by other NY sets aint want to be labeled as fake so they hopped on to sets that had kali roots. Back in the day, it was only ny-bred crip sets... 823, kc1, etc.


homie kc 1 is a cali set. dey just switched dey name. dont speak on it if u dont know what u talkin bout cuzzin. das how shit get twisted dey, eastside kitchen crips. 4 wuteva stupid reason dey switched dey name over hea.


so if they a kali set, why they rep the 6 and why they got smashed?


cant believe u said that like u aint rep the 5 and most ya homies dont. niggas dont know shit das why dey rep it.[/quote]

lol @ that on some real shit i aint even run into any bloods that aint bang 5 in ny but zip on some real shit whats the reasoning bangin to the same side as locs u dont she nothin strange with that? u dont gotta answer u prolly gonna say it in ya "bodes" :wink: but hey do what u do

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Unread post by kg_loco1 » July 27th, 2005, 2:42 pm

dam i aint even kno kc1 was originaly kitchen cuzzin i only ran into 1 of dem cats ever @ juvey actualy

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Unread post by purplecityhello » July 27th, 2005, 2:43 pm

I Bang that 5 till my Bl000D Dry


OG Preme still keepin it 031

(get off ya AOL and make some money nugga

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Unread post by BlueCadillaC167 » July 27th, 2005, 6:01 pm

I don't Bang any numbers. I just bang the blue rag and living it up for the C. But yo Yung K, You sure KC 1 was originally Kitchen. I thought KC 1 was strictly an Eastcoast set.

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Unread post by zip3ace » July 28th, 2005, 6:14 am

yung_k wrote:
Q wrote:
zip3ace wrote:[quote="Q"][quote="zip3ace"]Man! Dont nobody know how them guys started in NY. They didnt start like how the Bloods started. Bloods started as one nation with many sets. crips started as individual gangs... thats why them guys always beefing with each other kuz every kouple of months a new set would pop up. There used to be sets like Killa crips, united gangsta crips, cameleon crips, blue diamond crips, haitian mafis crips... it seemed like guys was just going to sleep neutral and waking up crip. So then all them new breed sets was getting into konflict with bigger sets like 823. Kuz for one, nobody knew where they kame from and 2) them new breeds was getting ran over by enemies, making the sets that put in work look bad. So then madd sets was getting smashed. Only 823 and ugc got a NY History of how they started and why they started. All these other crip sets popped up kuz of the east v. west shit. NY crip guys that were getting labeled as fake by other NY sets aint want to be labeled as fake so they hopped on to sets that had kali roots. Back in the day, it was only ny-bred crip sets... 823, kc1, etc.


homie kc 1 is a cali set. dey just switched dey name. dont speak on it if u dont know what u talkin bout cuzzin. das how shit get twisted dey, eastside kitchen crips. 4 wuteva stupid reason dey switched dey name over hea.


so if they a kali set, why they rep the 6 and why they got smashed?


cant believe u said that like u aint rep the 5 and most ya homies dont. niggas dont know shit das why dey rep it.[/quote]

lol @ that on some real shit i aint even run into any bloods that aint bang 5 in ny but zip on some real shit whats the reasoning bangin to the same side as locs u dont she nothin strange with that? u dont gotta answer u prolly gonna say it in ya "bodes" :wink: but hey do what u do[/quote]

last time i checked it was red v. blue, not right vs. left

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Unread post by zip3ace » July 28th, 2005, 6:16 am

BlueCadillaC167 wrote:I don't Bang any numbers. I just bang the blue rag and living it up for the C. But yo Yung K, You sure KC 1 was originally Kitchen. I thought KC 1 was strictly an Eastcoast set.


from my understanding they were an eastkoast set, known as killa crips. they got smashed, and then kame back as king crips or some shit.

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