Canada (Vancouver BC area II)

American organized crime groups included traditional groups such as La Cosa Nostra & the Italian Mafia to modern groups such as Black Mafia Family. Discuss the most organized criminal groups in the United States including gangs in Canada.
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Trey
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Unread post by Trey » October 17th, 2005, 11:01 pm

STEPPING UP THE RANKS
Indo-canadian Gangs Gain In Strength And Organization Even As The Community Unites Against Them

Young Indo-Canadian gangsters are becoming increasingly sophisticated, and adopting names and logos like the infamous outlaw motorcycle clubs, police say.

A year ago police felt that Indo-Canadian gangs, despite dozens of murders, were less organized than traditional crime groups. But today there is a level of sophistication exhibited by these rival groups as they tussle over turf in B.C.'s lucrative drug trade.

The RCMP's annual report on organized crime this year ranks the Indo-Canadian groups third after outlaw bikers and Asians in terms of their strength and organization in B.C.'s hierarchy of criminal organizations.

And the killing of gang members has continued, with 10 murders since last fall of Indo-Canadians or their associates linked to gangs.

The latest victim, Hardev Singh Sidhu, 27, was found slumped in his car at 136th Street and Grosvenor Road in Surrey early Friday morning.

Dozens of other drive-by shootings have been investigated by police in Abbotsford, Surrey, Vancouver and elsewhere, including a second Surrey shooting early Friday outside a pub.

The most disturbing trend, say police, is the increased organization of some Indo-Canadian gangsters, such as a Vancouver-based group calling itself the Independent Soldiers, and battling rival groups involved in drug trafficking.

On Sept. 10, Vancouver police were called to the downtown nightclub Tonic where members of the Independent Soldiers and the Abbotsford-based UN gang attacked each other with bar stools and broken bottles.

Two men were taken to hospital with injuries, but did not cooperate with police. No charges were laid.

Independent Soldiers' kingpin Sukhvinder Singh ( Bicky ) Dosanjh was killed in a car accident at Marine and Main Street two weeks ago, leaving a void in the evolving organization with links going back to notorious cocaine dealer Bindy Johal.

Dosanjh, a graduate of John Oliver secondary, is the brother of Gerpal Singh ( Paul ) Dosanjh, who was gunned down in March 2004 at the Gourmet Castle Restaurant in the 2800-block of East Hastings and who was also involved in the drug trade.

Paul Dosanjh had survived being shot in the head in August 2003.

The Dosanjh brothers are first cousins of Ron and Jimmy Dosanjh, among the original group of Indo-Canadian gangsters who were taken out in separate hits in 1994 and 1995. The high-profile murders were believed to have been arranged by Bindy Johal, their former associate-turned-rival in the cocaine trafficking world.

Johal was then murdered on the dance floor of a Vancouver nightclub in December 1998 in a targeted hit arranged by his former associate Bal Buttar. Buttar remains a blind quadriplegic after an attempt on his life in August 2001 by members of his own crew.

Vancouver police staked out Bicky Dosanjh's funeral last Saturday at Hamilton Harron Mortuary on Fraser Street where dozens of young men with gang links came to pay their respects to the dead gangster and former high school basketball star.

Vancouver police Insp. Kash Heed said the trend to more organized Indo-Canadian crime groups is disturbing.

"You are starting to see them identifying themselves in a similar way to gangs in the United States," Heed said. "Now you have Indo-Canadian gang clothing with identifiable logos."

But police and Indo-Canadian community groups are also evolving in their response to the Indo-Canadian violence. Ten months ago, the B.C. government committed tens of millions of dollars to the new B.C. Integrated Gang Task Force, which is targeting the violence among young Indo-Canadian gangsters that has led to dozens of murders in the last decade.

Delta Supt. John Robin is the officer in charge of the task force, which has just reached its full staffing complement of 60.

"We've had unbelievable cooperation from all the departments and agencies to put this together," Robin said in an interview. "Everyone's aware that this is a long-term commitment."

Robin said the task force is putting its effort into targeting violent individuals in groups who are currently active.

"What our purpose is is to target those individuals who are extremely violent," he said, adding that some on the list may be suspects in unsolved murders. "It takes probably more resources than one single department or detachment could put together."

Robin said the Indo-Canadian gangsters do not follow the model of true organized criminals "and in some ways that makes them more dangerous."

The new task force is gathering and coordinating intelligence on the Indo-Canadian gangs better than before, Robin said.

"That is one of the things we are really working hard on," he said.

But they are also involved in major criminal investigations.

"We are just scratching the surface. We are in here for the long term and none of us expect to turn this around overnight."

There have been several key arrests both in B.C. and Washington state related to Indo-Canadian organized crime.

Last April and May, several alleged Indo-Canadian gangsters were arrested in two separate kidnapping and unlawful confinement cases and are now facing a series of charges.

And in the U.S., an alleged ecstasy dealer and would-be politician named Ravinder Kaur Shergill was arrested after the Drug Enforcement Agency taped her in an undercover sting operation.

One of the most high-profile arrests was of Vancouver lawyer Kuldip Singh Chaggar, who was convicted in Seattle last April of tampering with a witness in a drug case involving alleged Indo-Canadian crime figures who were caught in a cross-border trafficking case.

Chaggar is now serving a year in jail, although he is appealing his conviction.

RCMP Insp. Paul Nadeau, head of the regional drug section, said the Indo-Canadians are primarily specializing in the transport of marijuana, with so many in the community involved in the commercial trucking industry. He said the Indo-Canadians are contracting to other crime groups to deliver their product.

Nadeau said that the use of commercial trucks to transport pot to the U.S. is up about 400 per cent over the last three years.

Jaskiren Sidhu, of the youth group UNITED, said it is disturbing to learn of the increasing sophistication of the Indo-Canadian crime groups.

But he said the Indo-Canadian community is taking steps to prevent further violence.

Groups like UNITED, VIRSA and others have been working with police and government to come up with strategies to combat the problem.

"For the first time, the police, the community and governments are coordinating their response in a very significant way," Sidhu said.

UNITED is doing mentoring and sports programs for youth and also working with a production company to develop anti-gang public service announcements.

"But there are no easy fixes. It is going to take a long time to reduce the level of violence and the power of the crime groups," Sidhu said.

The federal and provincial governments are committed to strategies to end the violence.

A 10-person committee of Indo-Canadian professionals is working on a report for the federal government, to be delivered this fall, on the Indo-Canadian gang problem.

Other groups are also working within the community to warn kids to stay away from gang life.

But there is still an attraction for youth to the mythic power of dead gangsters like the Dosanjhs and Bindy Johal, Heed said.

"Some youth looked up to these people and they still look up to these people as mentors," Heed said.

Proof of his belief are several websites still active where people spout on about which Indo-Canadian gangster they admire most. Bindy Johal still seems to get the most response, though other names of both dead and living Indo-Canadian crime figures are bandied about as heroes.

What has changed is that the Indo-Canadian community is taking ownership of the issue like never before, Heed said, with many groups being formed to steer young people away from gang life.

"We are starting to see little pockets of success, with several initiatives put in place in the last year," Heed said.

Vancouver police have been pro-active in following gang members to ensure they are not carrying weapons when they come downtown on a weekend to party.

"The message is if you come into Vancouver to party, you better behave," Heed said.

Vancouver nightclub shootings have been down in the last year, though there are still bar fights like the one that broke out Sept. 10.

Heed said that if Vancouver police become aware of a dispute between rival groups that could lead to an attempt on someone's life, officers get directly involved.

"We will go to the parents of these individuals and tell them what is going on," Heed said.

Parents do what they can to keep an eye on their kid.

"We have had significant success with this particular strategy.

But there are still problems.

Heed said there has been an "inordinate number of shots fired in southeast Vancouver," the neighbourhood where many of the Indo-Canadian gangsters still live.

"That is the area under my direct command. Fortunately, it has not resulted in any injuries," Heed said. "There have been shootings into vehicles, into houses or in the air. It is the bravado behaviour of individuals when they are out partying."

While much of the Indo-Canadian gang violence used to take place in Vancouver, it has shifted to cities east of downtown as the Indo-Canadian population has grown in those areas, Heed said.

Abbotsford and Surrey have had more of the killings in the last year and much of the gun action.

Vancouver police have also developed a graphic presentation on gang violence, which they have given to families, community leaders and "even to some youth at risk," Heed said.

Indo-Canadian Gang or Drug-Related Killings in the Last Year:

- - Sept. 30, 2005 -- Hardev Singh Sidhu, 27, was found shot to death in a car at 136th Street and Grosvenor Road in Surrey. He is believed to have been involved in the drug trade.

- - Aug. 28, 2005 -- Hartinder ( Harry ) Gill and his girlfriend Lexi Madsen were gunned down at a busy intersection in Abbotsford. Gill was facing an attempted murder charge at the time of his death and was well-known to police. His house was hit by gunfire in July.

- - May 13, 2005 -- Surrey resident Dean Mohamed Elshamy, 30, was found slumped in a late-model grey Audi in the parking lot of a Mac's store at 72nd Avenue and Scott Road in Surrey. While Elshamy is Egyptian, the intended target of the hit is believed to have been his buddy, Sandip Singh Duhre, who was uninjured in both the May shooting and a second incident in July 2005.

- - May 7, 2005 -- Inderjit Singh Rai, 23, shot to death about 2:30 a.m. in the 9800-block 140th Street in Surrey.

- - April 2, 2005 -- Sukh Jawanda, killed on a rural road in Abbotsford. His friend was injured in the shooting.

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Unread post by NW10 » December 3rd, 2005, 4:09 am

Vancouver, British Columbia, a city unaccustomed to widespread crime, is facing a rise in gang-related violence stemming from drug dealing and local turf wars between young people of Indian descent.

"They are Indo-Canadians killing Indo-Canadians," said Kash Heed, commanding officer of the Third Police District in Vancouver. "Seventy-six murders mainly within one ethnic group. The cycle of violence, we've not cracked it yet."

Immigrant community leaders blame inaction on the part of Vancouver police for the rise in gang violence. "Out here, it's a slap on the hand," said Amar Randhawa, co-founder of the Unified Network of Indo-Canadians for Togetherness and Education Through Discussion (UNITED). "Law enforcement can't crack the lower hierarchy, let alone get to the top."

But police officials said the cycle of murder and revenge has hampered their efforts. "One day suspect, and the next day victim," said Heed. "One day you are the shooter. The next day you're lying in your coffin."

According to police, gangs deal in the potent variety of marijuana called B.C. bud, which is grown in the province. "It is often exchanged for cocaine, cash, or firearms. It is a deal between two criminal gangs, one on the south side of the border and one on the north side, guns for marijuana," said constable Alex Borden of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police. "If there is violence in our streets and firearms are involved, we are concerned the firearms come from across the border."

According to Joe Giuliano, assistant chief at the local U.S. Border Patrol office in Blaine, Wash., 23 Canadian smugglers have been arrested on the U.S. side of the border so far this year. "Virtually all marijuana smuggling in the past fiscal year is either directly or indirectly tied back to the Indo-Canadian community," he said.

According to officials, gang members are generally from upscale families. "Unlike in other countries, people involved in the gang activity here are not the poor or disadvantaged," said Wallace Oppal, a justice of the Court of Appeal of British Columbia. "For the most part, kids involved here are people who come from middle-class and upper-class homes. They get involved for the glamour."

Heed added that parents should get more involved in discouraging their children from joining gangs. "We've gone to notify people their son was killed and they have been in such denial they slammed the door in the police officer's face," Heed said. "They don't want to believe their child is involved. They will ask the question to their dying day after their son is murdered why they didn't do something."

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Unread post by pooperscooper » December 7th, 2007, 12:21 am

B.C.'s Organized Crime Families:




Hells Angels and Vietnamese gangs are considered the most sophisticated groups, while Indo-Canadian gangs rank among the most violent




Outlaw Motorcycle Gangs/Hells Angels


Size: There are 95 members of the Hells Angels in seven chapters in the Lower Mainland and Nanaimo. There are also dozens of "associates" who are trusted friends of club members and assist in criminal activities.

Criminal activities: Heavily involved in B.C.'s $6-billion marijuana-growing industry, importing and distributing cocaine, hashish and increasingly, methamphetamine. Extortion, debt collection.

Propensity for violence: High. The Angels rule by fear and intimidation and aren't afraid to use violence to protect turf and criminal interests. Police are concerned about the Bandidos, a U.S. motorcycle gang already established in Washington state, moving into B.C. and sparking violence.

Level of sophistication: High. This is reflected in the low number of successful prosecutions.

Geographic reach: The Hells Angels have a network of chapters across Canada, the U.S., South America, Africa and Europe.

Structure/hierarchy: Organized into chapters in various cities, but no single crime boss. Each member works as his own boss, if he wants, and in small cells to elude police detection. "They are disciplined and well led," says Vancouver RCMP Insp. Bob Paulson, in charge of major investigations involving outlaw motorcycle gangs.




Asian


Size: Unknown. Police say there are dozens of small Vietnamese groups operating in B.C. The most prominent Asian gang in the Vancouver area is the Big Circle Boys, also known as Dai Huen Jai.

Criminal activities: Vietnamese groups control about 85 per cent of the marijuana-growing operations in the Lower Mainland and most of the drug trade on Vancouver Island, north of Nanaimo. They have recently branched out into methamphetamine. They also use Big Circle Boys connections to export pot to the U.S. The Big Circle Boys have made the Lower Mainland a hotbed of counterfeit credit- card fraud activity. BCB's mainstay is importing and distributing cocaine and southeast Asian heroin. BCB members have been involved in murder, loan-sharking, people-smuggling, extortion, home-invasion robberies and exporting stolen luxury cars to Asia.

Propensity for violence: Vietnamese gangsters are known for being ruthless and unpredictably violent during confrontations. Other Asian crime groups are more low-key, not wanting to attract police attention, but will resort to violence and murder to protect their criminal interests.

Level of sophistication: High. Vietnamese have developed a marijuana-growing system that has been exported to Vietnamese groups in Ontario and Australia. Big Circle Boys have computer experts for credit-card fraud and use off-shore accounts and shell companies to launder money and elude police detection.

Geographic reach: Vietnamese and Big Circle Boys have national networks in such major cities as Vancouver, Calgary, Edmonton, Toronto and Montreal, and are expanding into smaller cities. BCB has a similar national network in the U.S. Some local Asian gangsters are connected to Hong Kong triads, secret societies of criminals.

Structure/hierarchy: Asian crime groups typically organize in small groups with low-ranking members answering to a crime boss, called a Dai Lo (big brother).




Eastern European


Size: Unknown. They are difficult for police to get a handle on because they use so many languages. Members are from Russia and other former Soviet Union countries.

Criminal activities: Mainly known for drug trafficking and credit/debit-card fraud. But also involved in people-smuggling, money-laundering, extortion, export of stolen luxury vehicles. Also have infiltrated diamond industry in Russia and southern Africa.

Propensity for violence: Medium. Don't usually like drawing police attention, but will use violence if necessary.

Level of sophistication: Varies. Often rely on expertise of individuals outside the group to assist in a criminal undertaking. Three members of a Romanian crime group were recently arrested in Vancouver for allegedly being involved in a highly sophisticated automatic-banking-machine fraud. Police say they used a bogus card -reader to download magnetic-strip information from cards and recorded personal identification numbers by using a tiny, overhead camera linked to a remote video monitor. Eastern Europeans are also involved in counterfeit currency, exporting stolen luxury cars, money-laundering and smuggling women, especially from Russia, to work as prostitutes and in massage parlours.

Geographic reach: Operate across the country but mainly concentrated in Ontario. Highly mobile with varying levels of presence in B.C., Alberta and Quebec.

Structure/hierarchy: Operate in small cells.




Independents and Indo-Canadians


Size: Unknown.

Criminal activities: Independents are primarily involved in marijuana-growing operations, where profits are used to fund legitimate businesses. They often cooperate with Asians and Hells Angels to distribute their "product." Indo-Canadians operate many dial-a-dope operations, using pagers and cellphones to deliver drugs on the street. Indo-Canadian truckers are lured by quick cash to smuggle B.C.-grown marijuana across the U.S. border.

Propensity for violence: High, mainly because members are young and show poor impulse

control. Shifting allegiances lead to violence, usually involving guns, among Indo-Canadian males. There have been more than 60 gang-related murders in B.C. involving Indo-Canadians in the last 15 years.

Level of sophistication: Low.

Geographic reach: Concentrated primarily in the Lower Mainland, Fraser Valley, lower Vancouver Island and Alberta.

Structure/hierarchy: Loosely organized in small groups of friends and relatives.




Traditional (Italian-Based) Organizations


Size: Unknown.

Criminal activities: Involved in illegal gaming such as sports betting, marijuana-growing operations, drug distribution, overseas lottery-ticket sales, debt collection and stock-market manipulation. Invest profits in real estate and such traditional businesses as construction companies, bars and restaurants.

Propensity for violence: Medium to high. Don't like to attract police attention.

Level of sophistication: Medium. Most groups have existed for several generations.

Geographic reach: Concentrated primarily in Montreal, Toronto, Hamilton and Niagara region of Ontario. While Mafia members remain low-profile in the Vancouver area, they do exist and have a symbiotic relationship with the Hells Angels in B.C. that is based on "social ties and illicit businesses," says the 2004 Annual Report on Organized Crime in Canada, published by the Criminal Intelligence Service Canada.

Structure/hierarchy: Operate in small groups but report to a crime boss known as the godfather.

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Unread post by Silencioso » December 7th, 2007, 12:48 pm

Looks like the gang world in BC is dominated by whites and Asians. The opposite of L.A.

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Unread post by pooperscooper » December 7th, 2007, 3:01 pm

yeah and its not about turf here, it's all about money. Most people join gangs for money rather than brotherhood.

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Vancouver based Drug ring busted

Unread post by pooperscooper » December 13th, 2007, 6:12 pm

Approximate international seizures include:

Over 600 kg of cocaine
Over 111 kg of methamphetamines
83 kg of ecstasy
26 units of heroin
1,200 kg of drug precursors including ephedrine and MDP2P
7,800 lbs of marijuana
Real estate properties worth over $6 million
Vehicles worth over $300,000
$2.1 million in cash
17 handguns and prohibited weapons

FULL ARTICLE http://www.canada.com/globaltv/national ... d9&k=95593

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Re: Canada (Vancouver BC area II)

Unread post by dthav » June 8th, 2008, 1:21 pm

It's funny how the east indian gangs are taking on names and colors simular to what the gangs in L.A. do.
Their almost copy cats of what the crips and the bloods do in L.A.

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Re: Canada (Vancouver BC area II)

Unread post by Azure9920 » June 8th, 2008, 4:21 pm

dthav wrote:It's funny how the east indian gangs are taking on names and colors simular to what the gangs in L.A. do.
Their almost copy cats of what the crips and the bloods do in L.A.
That's like saying every gang copy's Crips and Bloods...

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UN gang

Unread post by dthav » June 22nd, 2008, 7:24 pm

Is there any more news as to what is going on with the UN gang now that their leader is in prison in the U.S.?

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Re: Canada (Vancouver BC area II)

Unread post by Trey » July 17th, 2008, 9:20 pm

The East Indian gangs are not copying the colors or gangbangin' style of the Bloods and Crips... actually their colors are pretty heavily influenced by the Hell's Angels... They just display their name on shirts, $600 custom made Deuce hoodies, etc... The Independent Soldiers is an East Indian headed gang but now they got a lot of whites in it and a few Asians...

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Re: Canada (Vancouver BC area II)

Unread post by gino » August 24th, 2008, 8:11 pm

Independant soldiers is multi-ethnic, but there is fuckin tons of white guys in it, its like almost all white

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Re: Vancouver based Drug ring busted

Unread post by razbojnik » August 31st, 2008, 6:10 pm

pooperscooper wrote:Approximate international seizures include:

Over 600 kg of cocaine
Over 111 kg of methamphetamines
83 kg of ecstasy
26 units of heroin
1,200 kg of drug precursors including ephedrine and MDP2P
7,800 lbs of marijuana
Real estate properties worth over $6 million
Vehicles worth over $300,000
$2.1 million in cash
17 handguns and prohibited weapons

FULL ARTICLE http://www.canada.com/globaltv/national ... d9&k=95593
He must've pissed off the wrong people to get busted like that...

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Re: Vancouver based Drug ring busted

Unread post by Azure9920 » September 1st, 2008, 6:13 pm

razbojnik wrote:
pooperscooper wrote:Approximate international seizures include:

Over 600 kg of cocaine
Over 111 kg of methamphetamines
83 kg of ecstasy
26 units of heroin
1,200 kg of drug precursors including ephedrine and MDP2P
7,800 lbs of marijuana
Real estate properties worth over $6 million
Vehicles worth over $300,000
$2.1 million in cash
17 handguns and prohibited weapons

FULL ARTICLE http://www.canada.com/globaltv/national ... d9&k=95593
He must've pissed off the wrong people to get busted like that...
Like the cops? lol

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Re: Vancouver based Drug ring busted

Unread post by razbojnik » September 1st, 2008, 6:42 pm

Azure9920 wrote:Like the cops? lol
Why would the cops give a crap about his operations when it could actually make each police officer a couple thousand extra bucks each year to keep off his operations???

Maybe he didn't want to bribe them and pissed them off, good idea.

But your right, because he's not white, he can't even take a shot at trying to deal with the man.

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Re: Vancouver based Drug ring busted

Unread post by mmd604 » September 7th, 2008, 2:48 pm

razbojnik wrote:
Azure9920 wrote:Like the cops? lol
Why would the cops give a crap about his operations when it could actually make each police officer a couple thousand extra bucks each year to keep off his operations???

Maybe he didn't want to bribe them and pissed them off, good idea.

But your right, because he's not white, he can't even take a shot at trying to deal with the man.

He got busted because hes an international drug lord. This is not eastern europe you cant just pay off the all the cops. I garantee the americans were leaning on the RCMP

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Re: Vancouver based Drug ring busted

Unread post by razbojnik » September 12th, 2008, 8:10 am

mmd604 wrote:He got busted because hes an international drug lord. This is not eastern europe you cant just pay off the all the cops. I garantee the americans were leaning on the RCMP
International drug lord my ass LOL. He's the Pablo Escobar of China huh?? LOL...

Of course you can't pay off all the cops there. People are too cold and professional, it's hard to find people you can actually bribe. Too many people there live in some isolated reality that just isn't global reality...

It's not about the Americans or the RCMP jeez.. It's about the man up top. You get in good with him you won't be the next John Gotti you'll be the next Henry Kissinger.....

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Re: Canada (Vancouver BC area II)

Unread post by INDO » September 13th, 2008, 1:32 am

dthav wrote:It's funny how the east indian gangs are taking on names and colors simular to what the gangs in L.A. do.
Their almost copy cats of what the crips and the bloods do in L.A.
Not true, I'm from this area, these havn't took jack shit from crips or bloods, they're strictly money gangs, there primary concern is money, not so much rivals, rivals come into the scene when the gang starts losing money

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Re: Canada (Vancouver BC area II)

Unread post by INDO » February 3rd, 2009, 1:09 am

dthav wrote:It's funny how the east indian gangs are taking on names and colors simular to what the gangs in L.A. do.
Their almost copy cats of what the crips and the bloods do in L.A.
man, what are you talking about lol ? they don't even have names, very few have colors, which are simply to separate each other, i've read a lot of interviews with east indian gang members, and they all say that people apply these stupid names and they're just a crew doing whatever they are.

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