Crazy Dragons top Hells Angels as top gang threat in Alberta

American organized crime groups included traditional groups such as La Cosa Nostra & the Italian Mafia to modern groups such as Black Mafia Family. Discuss the most organized criminal groups in the United States including gangs in Canada.
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Trey
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Crazy Dragons top Hells Angels as top gang threat in Alberta

Unread post by Trey » March 15th, 2008, 11:59 am

At a time when Hells Angels are gathering outside Calgary to celebrate the group's 10th anniversary in Alberta, law enforcement agencies are identifying another gang -- the Crazy Dragons -- as the province's top criminal threat.

The Criminal Intelligence Service Alberta's annual report, obtained Friday by the Herald, identifies 54 criminal groups of varying sophistication operating in the province.

Four groups are identified as "mid-level" threats, meaning they have demonstrated some level of sophistication and are linked to multiple criminal groups.
Hells Angels members arrive at the Calgary-area clubhouse on Friday. A report links them to the street-level drug trade.

The remaining 50 were classified as "lower level" threats focused on a limited amount of activities and fewer links to other criminal organizations.

"The most noticeable criminal group in Alberta -- with cocaine operations throughout the province as well as in parts of British Columbia, Saskatchewan and the Northwest Territories -- is known to police as the Crazy Dragons," says the report, a collection of intelligence from Alberta's law enforcement agencies.

In another passage that doesn't refer to the Crazy Dragons by name, the document says nearly every law enforcement agency that contributed to the report has encountered the gang.

"Among competing groups there is one that surpasses all the others with their drug products being provided in some measure to virtually every reporting city and town, even in the midst of activities by other criminal groups," the report says.

Nothing is said about any specific activity in Calgary, but police in the past have linked the Crazy Dragons to the deadly feud between two street gangs, Fresh off the Boat (FOB) and FOB Killers (FK).

A previous Criminal Intelligence Service Alberta report said the Crazy Dragons may have supplied guns to one of the gangs. Violence between FOB and FK has killed nine members or associates since 2001.

This year's report said a second group, led by a Vietnamese organized crime figure, "is involved in the large-scale production of marihuana (sic) in southern Alberta."

The report bleakly predicts the province's booming economy will allow organized crime groups to maintain their grip on the underworld while police deal with the fallout among the working poor and drug addicted.

"It is suggested the bulk of police intervention will become increasingly necessary at the street level where social network breakdowns (domestic and labour-related) as well as competition among lower level criminals will manifest themselves with greater frequency," reads the report.

The Hells Angels, meanwhile, are identified as being involved in the street-level drug trade.

The worldwide biker gang arrived in Alberta 10 years ago when it took over locally based independent gangs such as the Grim Reapers in Calgary.

Despite that history and three chapters in Alberta -- Calgary, Edmonton and a "Nomad" chapter based in Red Deer -- Criminal Intelligence Service Alberta says the gang has failed to make significant inroads in the province's criminal underworld.

"Without making light of their propensity for extreme violence -- augmented by loyalty to the club's name -- members of the Hells Angels continue to lack in criminal business savvy," the report says.

"They have proven themselves to be an available source of 'muscle' either for their own endeavours or for other criminal organizations. They are preoccupied with the supremacy of their name within the criminal biker sub-culture."

The Hells Angels' Calgary chapter has suffered some highly publicized setbacks, notably having to abandon a fortified clubhouse under construction in Bowness because it violated building codes.

The chapter's then-president, Ken Szczerba, was jailed in 2001 for trying to arrange a plot to bomb the homes of Ald. Dale Hodges and a community activist involved in getting construction halted.

Nevertheless, police agencies underestimate the Hells Angels in this province at their peril, said the author of several books on the gang.

"They weren't the best and brightest of the bikers, but they're still part of an international organization and they're dangerous," said Yves Lavigne.

More than 50 Hells Angels from different chapters pulled up to the local clubhouse southeast of Calgary Friday evening as RCMP cruisers patrolled nearby roads.

Neighbour Nancy Gunn said the motorcycle gang has met at the clubhouse next door before, and she's never had any concerns.

"Rush hour traffic is worse than having a few bikes go by," she said.

Monitoring Hells Angels parties has dubious value, Lavigne added, considering they take great care to behave in public.

"When the Hells Angels socialize, they know they're under scrutiny," he said.

Although there are only three chapters in Alberta, the Hells Angels involvement in the drug trade is widespread, said Lavigne.

"Who do you think supplies Fort McMurray and Grande Prairie?"

Those boomtowns are evidence Alberta's robust economy has a downside, Criminal Intelligence Service Alberta says -- growing demand for illegal drugs that will enrich organized crime groups and stretch police resources.

"The problems associated with harmful lifestyle choices facilitated by increased incomes may predominate law enforcement attention," the report says.

Trey
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Unread post by Trey » March 15th, 2008, 12:00 pm


whiskeyjack
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Unread post by whiskeyjack » March 17th, 2008, 8:57 am

lol makes esne that organized crime would try and take hold in alberta.

-Fort Mcmurray, LOL, thats were all the oil workers are housed, and they HAVE alot of money to spend and i know for a fact there is alot of cocaine in fort mcmurray

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Unread post by EmperorPenguin » March 17th, 2008, 1:24 pm

whiskeyjack wrote:lol makes esne that organized crime would try and take hold in alberta.

-Fort Mcmurray, LOL, thats were all the oil workers are housed, and they HAVE alot of money to spend and i know for a fact there is alot of cocaine in fort mcmurray
"Despite that history and three chapters in Alberta -- Calgary, Edmonton and a "Nomad" chapter based in Red Deer -- Criminal Intelligence Service Alberta says the gang has failed to make significant inroads in the province's criminal underworld."

I find this hard to believe as the HA have been very busy in both the business world and drug/prostitute trade for some time in Alberta. They don't make a lot of noise violence wise, but money wise they're doing a lot of moving.

Cocaine has been big in Fort McMurray for some time, but it wasn't until about late 90's early 2000's that the HA finally moved in and set up shop, literally as well with the opening of Showgirls just off of downtown. And don't get me wrong, there is a lot of money in Fort Mac, but it is offset some what by the huge cost of living up there.

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