MEXICAN JAILS

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Lonewolf
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MEXICAN JAILS

Unread post by Lonewolf » June 17th, 2005, 9:06 pm

Anybody ever spent some time in a Mexican jail?

How worse than U.S. jails are they really?

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Unread post by Lonewolf » June 19th, 2005, 9:25 pm

Well, I assume none of you have spent a night ever.

If you ever find yourself in a jail in TJ, send me a signal, and I'll come get you out. Still have some people who remember the family and respect us.

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Unread post by AcmeWhiteBread » June 20th, 2005, 8:24 pm

Ive been to jail in TJ about 6 times, Rosarito 3 times in a 48 hour period one weekend, Ensenada for two weeks, San Miguel 5 times. Almost did a year for a joint. Growing upo in So Cal we used to go to mex every weekend to drink before there was a age limit. Also you can see why Im sober now!!!!

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Unread post by Kemosave » July 10th, 2005, 5:33 pm

I hear that Acme. No I've never been and I don't want to either. Almost went once when I was walking around TJ. Almost got setup by a policia but my people came up so he palmed whatever it was he was bending down to drop next to me. Definitely was going to hustle me out of my wad. I've some friends who been there though. They are doing good today and won't ever have to worry about that again.

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Unread post by MICK » July 16th, 2005, 8:34 am

Whats TJ like Lonewolf?

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Unread post by Lonewolf » July 18th, 2005, 11:37 am

AcmeWhiteBread wrote:Ive been to jail in TJ about 6 times, Rosarito 3 times in a 48 hour period one weekend, Ensenada for two weeks, San Miguel 5 times. Almost did a year for a joint. Growing upo in So Cal we used to go to mex every weekend to drink before there was a age limit. Also you can see why Im sober now!!!!
Orale Acme, you're a regular - you know the ropes by now, no big deal just a chance for you to get some sleep and get over the hangover -right? lol

The Ensenada 2 weeks, that had to be more than just drinking or fighting?
2 weeks is what we call down here a "quinzon" or a "10-15", you ain't graduated out of peewee school unless you've done some "quinces". But I bet that they did'nt transfer you to the Big House/La Pinta, they kept you in the local jail eating pot boiled beans & hard tortillas, unless you had some friendly bring you better food or got lucky and washed down the cell floors for your meals -right? How 'bout them jailers? Definetely not no gay-sheriff deputy right?

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Unread post by Lonewolf » July 18th, 2005, 11:40 am

AcmeWhiteBread wrote:...Almost did a year for a joint...
What year was that 1960? You should of just hit them up with a 20 on the spot.

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Unread post by Lonewolf » July 18th, 2005, 11:42 am

MICK wrote:Whats TJ like Lonewolf?
What do you mean?
The jails? gangs? narcos? party scene? regular life? what?

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Unread post by MICK » July 18th, 2005, 2:24 pm

Just everthing brother. Gangs, partys, regular life, scenery, ect.

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Unread post by MICK » July 18th, 2005, 2:25 pm

Just everthing brother. Gangs, partys, regular life, scenery, ect.

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Unread post by Lonewolf » July 18th, 2005, 3:21 pm

MICK wrote:Just everthing brother. Gangs, partys, regular life, scenery, ect.
To start off, the scenery “SUCKS” on the surface looks real ugly. The whole city is full of Colonias (Barrio has a different meaning than Colonia) perched up on hills, hillsides, and canyons, and the exceptions to them are rare. But ugly is also beautiful, because the set up is one that invites diversity from all walks of life living next to each other. Also the geography is such that allows you to go up this hill and cut a route to your destination instead of the long traffic traveled routes. For the locals this is a blessing in disguise, because while you are taking the long way, the local already cut through and come back. The Colonias range from wealthy rich to extremely poor, with the vast majority of them having a mixture of residents that range from middle-class to upper-poor, with a sprinkle of well-to-do living side by side. In other words, on one side you have may have a family in a two-room house, next to a family with a moderate-average looking house, next to a family with a huge multi-floor house. The graffiti is everywhere, even along the major roadways and boulevards, most of it is of crude form or tagger works, very little of gang affiliation. In many places you’ll see heaps of trash, and many vacant lots are used as dumps, especially in the outer-rim Colonias, But this doesn't mean that you one lives in a dump, just that there are things of this nature that give the rest of the street or Colonia or city for that fact, an appearance of not being clean, however the vast majority of households keep their property clean. Most Colonias have a normal structure set up, complete with electricity, running water & sewage. All types of services are available to the residents, from Dominos Pizza delivery to Smart & Final stores. The streets are a challenge, mainly because of the driving attitude of its residents which challenges you to “learn how to drive” or “get off the road & park it”, but also because of the lack of signage which many claim it is a deliberate entrapment set-up for visitors which gives police an excuse to pull them over with any accusation of a traffic violation (be advised - they don't need it). Also the number of pot holes make for a real challenging task, one registers them into memory and automatically puts them into auto-pilot when traveling the usual roads, and as you drive into a new one and feel your cars' pain, you re-format your memory to remember this "new" pot hole for the next time.
The residents of the Colonias know just about everything that goes on in their neighborhood, and they know just about everyone that either belongs or doesn’t. Unlike in the U.S. where supermarkets reign supreme, down here the corner grocery store is the main supplier to the residents. The custom is not to buy fruits, vegetables, meats or tortillas in bulk and storing them in your refrigerator. The custom is to go buy a lil’ of what you’ll need “today” for dinner & tomorrows lunch – a couple of tomatoes, one onion, a kilo of tortillas & ½ kilo of meat. Even the pet dogs enjoy the home-cooked daily leftovers they get, and I say dogs in plural because no one has just one dog and everyone has to have dogs –fock cats, dogs rule down here “do not trespass at night” even if you think that dog is wimpy. We have a saying in our culture that says “perro que ladra no muerde” – dog that barks doesn’t bite.
In the Colonias just about every house has their own little or big yard, grass or not but they have it, it is traditional, that is because you are always having family gatherings, kids fiestas, or house parties for a multitude of occasions, be they a birthday, baptism, wedding or quinceañeras, or just simply a boxing match or soccer game is reason enough for the carne asada grill to be put out and the gates swung open for your neighbors and friends to come and enjoy with your family. Parties are a weekly weekend norm, no 10pm or 2am rules apply here in the Colonias, you have the freedom to party with the music loud and your guests can double park all along the whole street all night without any real problems with police or your neighbors, there is onlY a few un-written rules about all this house-party deal. 1 – don’t complain whenever your neighbor decides to throw his party, 2 – don’t allow your guests to block your neighbors driveway, 3 – clean the street up the next morning, 4 – don’t piss on your neighbors tires or dog, and a few more I can’t really think of right now.

To be continued…

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Unread post by Lonewolf » July 18th, 2005, 5:11 pm

The city is broken up into Delegaciones (sectors), the oldest of these being CENTRO (downtown), which has many Colonias aside from the downtown business center and the Tijuana river zone which is the center of government, and shopping for the more affluent & tourism.
Some of the oldest and most notorious Colonias are in this sector, such as La Cahuila (the Red District), and La Zona Norte –home to the infamous Midnighters as well as being a nest of vice and smugglers. The Avenida Revolucion, La Revo as it is called down here, is the strip where the tourists come for gifts and picture taking riding a stripe painted zebra-looking burro (donkey), but the avenue is really famously known because of the strip bars & dancehalls all along the strip. Here you can get whatever you want for a price, and here you can get into all kinds of problems if you’re not paying attention to what you’re doing.
La Zona Del Rio (Rio Zone) is the best planned and developed part of downtown, with wide avenues and monuments, pyramid looking architectural buildings and a big shopping mall. This part of downtown is of fairly recent build up. It used to be nothing but swamps and sandgrounds along the free-flowing un-built Tijuana River. There used to be neighborhood here called Cartolandia (cardboard city) carto for carton/cardboard & landia for Disneyland, as a way of giving it a friendly mocking non-existent beauty in comparison with Disneyland. Then one rainy year, the rains brought too much water and swept across everything in its path, taking the residents of Cartolandia by surprise and swept them to their death. The unofficial rumor was that the government in partnership with developers, deliberately open up the dam releasing the water in order to clean up this area from the squatters (as the residents were termed) and then were able to develop this part of the city into what it is today.
Further east along the Blvd Agua Caliente is where you’ll find El Toreo (bullring), El Hipodromo (racetrack), and the famous Tijuana golf course, behind it is where the most affluent residents of the city have their homes, including the infamous Arellano-Felix (Tijuana Cartel) and their prior constituents like Jesus Contreras & el Señor Gallardo. Some of these elite residents have even been known to have personal exotic animal zoos in their properties, but you will never get a glimpse of them, unless you are connected or have a personal invite.

West & South of CENTRO, is the San Antonio De Los Buenos sector, and this is where I am most familiar with. A myriad of Colonias perched up as I previously described, all winding down to the main arteries of the city, all with a large proportion of their residents commuting to and from work or school across the border. Many of the residents here are called Los Rodinos, a name taken from the Simpson-Rodino amnesty law which gave legal U.S. residency status to about 3 million Mexican Nationals. Many here in Tijuana quickly hopped a ride to L.A. & So Cal and got their papers, hence the term “Rodinos”. These people keep many of the local businesses and vendors afloat with U.S. dollars, and these people are much in-tune with American ways and culture. Everything you have in California –they have it here. Their homes may not look like much from the outside (in comparison with the U.S.) but they are fully theirs –not renting, not buying –no such thing down here for most. But once inside their pads, you’ll find all the commodities needed, from cable and television, to telephones and hot water. Their vehicles are just like any other ones you see on the average in American roads, and many own them –not lease, nor monthly payments, why? Because they don’t have to pay outrageous rents, or mortgages, like most of us here in the U.S. The downside to this is in the amount of time you spend at the border crossing, and the lack of emergency services and civil protection by the authorities, but if you or your family grew up in the neighborhood –then you can rest a lot more at ease than recent immigrants, still you keep your fusca ready, just in case. Even though guns and ammo are illegal in Mexico and heavily penalized, everyone has them and do not hesitate to use them, as the trend now fully demonstrates in the amount of gun violence which reigns supreme.
Here in these Colonias, Spanglish & English is a norm, everybody speaks it to a large extent, either because they are commuting, deal with tourism & family visitors, or have lived in the U.S. Anywhere you go here, you will find many that Habla Ingles.
A drastic difference in terms of residential neighborhoods in the U.S. where certain types of businesses can not set up, or they are kept on the main streets, down here you can find yourself with a body shop on one side, a mechanics shop across the street, and a maquiladora (factory) down the corner. Everywhere there are taco places; Tijuana is renowned for its tacos. Everywhere during the morning or evening hours you can stop and eat some tacos. There are breakfast tacos and there are diner tacos, and all are delicious. You just have to take a chance where you eat, or do like I do, you eat only where you know the people, or you eat where you see a ton of people eating tacos. Neither method is guaranteed to be all safe to your stomach, but it is better that going at it blindly.
The morning tacos can be from the list below v v v v
Tacos a Vapor (steamed), soft tortilla steamed in a red sauce, filled with finely shredded rat (I mean beef), and complimented with shredded lettuce, and pickled onions, covered with a chile sauce.
Tacos de Pescado o Camarones (fish or shrimp), deep fried in batter, with shreeded cabbage, tartar sauce, squirt of lime juice, and green or red sauce.
Tacos de Birria (beef or goat stewed meat), served in a soft tortilla, complimented with diced onion and cilantro, with a lil’ lime juice.
The diner tacos are a whole different set, the most famous being the carne asada tacos, I think everyone has had them of one sort or another. Other tacos include v v v v
Tacos de Tripas (tripes), sound yucky but they’re really a favorite.
Tacos de Carnitas (pork meat), these are also a favorite.
Tacos al Pastor (bbq beef), but it is not sweet, and is sliced off a big chunk of beef cooking sideways on a broiler –really good stuff.
Anyways, I got carried away with the tacos, however they are part of the landscape and culture of Tijuana. I’ve been to just about all major cities in Mexico and nowhere do they make good tacos like they do here –that is a fact, not wishing to put anybody else down, just my true opinion.

To be continued…

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Unread post by Kemosave » July 19th, 2005, 9:39 am

I'll take those fish tacos on the docks of Ensenada anytime I can get them! Hey Lonewolf, how much should I be paying for those anyways?

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Unread post by Kemosave » July 19th, 2005, 9:41 am

Seriously, I know what I pay when I'm in Baja but let's see your price list. What should we be paying for food and lodgings. Break it down for us. Peace.

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Unread post by Lonewolf » July 19th, 2005, 10:10 am

First off - ALL TACOS GO FOR $1 or less ANYWHERE YOU EAT =10 PESOS.

Regarding lodging and all those other expenses, well it depends how you want to spend the time. Either in king's comfort or just regular. Being that I don't beleive that most of us on here have serious cash, then it is regular for us all -right? GO TO THE TRAVEL AGENCY SITE FOR PRICES!

Seriously, if you know someone downhere, you don't need a lot of cash.

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Unread post by Kemosave » July 19th, 2005, 8:33 pm

Dang lonewolf you sound like a travel agent.. lol. I'll fess up though because you were kind enough to respond.

I pay 80 to 90 centavos for a good fish taco in a resort typically. I like to stay in nice places so it can get up to $30 a night. Now if I'm off the beaten track like in Mexico deep, then 1/2 that.

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Unread post by Lonewolf » July 24th, 2005, 11:29 pm

Kemosave wrote:Dang lonewolf you sound like a travel agent.. lol.
Ahh man, why you going to cut short my inspiration? Chingado kIMO, you sure do have a way with words. I'm going to try and ignore your "Christian" a*s, and make pretend that you moved to beyond the stars... up in heaven :twisted: lol

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Unread post by Kemosave » July 26th, 2005, 5:11 pm

Lol..

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