2nd long-range missile at N. Korea launch site?

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jeremy
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Unread post by jeremy » June 29th, 2006, 12:35 pm

MiChuhSuh wrote:
dutch wrote:
jeremy wrote:Hip hop sucks.Anyone with a brain knows that.It is wrong for other races to engage in hip hop because most blacks are racist.Blacks think that other races engaging in hip hop are not "cool" or "black" enough for it.


That is not true,blacks hate it when somebody of another race do hip-hop shit and act black.While they are not.It is all about keepin it real and ofcourse you got to have skills.Step your game up.


:lol: :lol:
Are two white people seriously having a conversation on "what blacks think" or "what blacks hate"? To a level it's understandableif you were discussing about a majority of a group, but you guys are talking it to another level and acting like you know everyone and try to correct each other ("that's not true,blacks hate it when...") lol

niro wrote:I dnt think its wrong for ppl other than blacks to listen and perform hip hop, its good to c other races become successful like Jin for asians and eminem for whites


did you see Jin's new myspace song? Jin is tite man I hope he gets a second entrance into the mainstream soon, he really fixed his songs from that BS "Learn Chinese" crap that the record companies had him do.


No I am not white either.I'm hispanic.It's funny that you came to that conclusion just because I said something that is true.Most blacks are racist and alot of people will agree with me:asians,whites,hispanics and even blacks.

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Christina Marie
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2nd long-range missile at N. Korea launch site?

Unread post by Christina Marie » July 7th, 2006, 1:56 am

2nd long-range missile at N. Korea launch site?

South Korean report: Pyongyang may have readied another Taepodong-2


Video: N. Korea missile test


Image


SEOUL, South Korea - Intelligence suggests North Korea could have another long-range Taepodong-2 at a launch site on the country’s east coast, Yonhap news agency quoted South Korea’s defense minister as saying Friday.

The report came after North Korea test-fired a long-range missile and six other shorter-range missiles on Wednesday, drawing international condemnation.

Defense Minister Yoon Kwang-ung said in Friday’s report that an earlier intelligence report showed the North may have moved two long-range missiles to the site before Wednesday’s launch, Yonhap said. He said, however, that further intelligence was needed to confirm the second missile was still at the launch pad, Yonhap said.

On Thursday, North Korea angrily mocked international criticism of its multiple missile tests, threatening to fire off more rockets.

In the face of nearly unanimous world condemnation of the seven missile tests on Wednesday, Pyongyang’s foreign minister released a blustery statement declaring it had the right to develop and test its weapons — and vowing unspecified retaliation against anyone who tries to stop it.

“Our military will continue with missile launch drills in the future as part of efforts to strengthen self-defense deterrent,” said the statement, carried in state-run media. “If anyone intends to dispute or add pressure about this, we will have to take stronger physical actions in other forms.”

The statement did not specify what actions North Korea would take.

The aggressive stance from Pyongyang coincided with intense diplomatic activity in world capitals to formulate a response to the tests. Washington and its allies — particularly Japan — clamored for sanctions against the North, but struggled against resistance by China and Russia.

International furor
North Korea set off an international furor when it tested seven missiles, all of which landed into the Sea of Japan without causing any damage. The blasts apparently included a long-range Taepodong-2 that broke up less than a minute after takeoff and splashed into the sea.

On Friday, South Korea’s Yonhap news agency reported that Choe Myong Nam, councilor at the North’s mission to the U.N. in Geneva, said the tests weren’t an attack on anyone.

U.S. Assistant Secretary of State Christopher Hill and Chinese Vice Foreign Minister Wu Dawei — their nations’ senior negotiators on North Korea — conferred on the missile tests Friday in Beijing.

The meeting came just hours after their presidents spoke by phone. Hill also omet with the Chinese foreign minister before heading to Seoul as part of a regional diplomatic push.

China, which provides oil and other economic assistance to North Korea, is seen as key to getting Pyongyang to stop its missile tests and resume long-stalled negotiations over its nuclear weapons programs. The U.S. has urged Beijing to exert maximum leverage on North Korea, though so far Chinese efforts have been largely limited to diplomatic appeals.

South Korea said Friday it had turned down a North Korean proposal to hold military talks this week, citing tension over the missile launches. The rejection came despite Seoul’s vow to press ahead with political and economic engagement with its neighbor as a way to solve the long-running conflict on the divided Korean Peninsula.

North Korea proposed the meeting on Monday, two days before the missile tests. It would be aimed at setting up talks between generals to try to reduce tension along the world’s most heavily fortified border.


A Japanese newspaper reported Friday that North Korea had targeted South Pacific waters in the vicinity of Hawaii with the long-range missile. The conservative daily Sankei cited unnamed U.S. and Japanese and officials as saying Japan’s Defense Agency and the U.S. military reached that conclusion after analyzing the missile’s path from data collected from intelligence equipment.

The report couldn’t be immediately independently confirmed, and Pentagon officials said Thursday that the very brief flight of the Taepodong-2 made it difficult to collect useful technical data, such as its intended target. At this point, U.S. officials are leaning toward the theory that it was configured as a space launch to deliver a satellite into orbit, rather than as a flight test of a ballistic missile.

NBC: U.S. refutes claims on targeting
But NBC News' Jim Miklaszewski reported late Thursday that U.S. officials dispute the newspaper's claims that the missile launched July 4 was aimed at the waters off Hawaii.

U.S. intelligence reports told NBC News that the missile started tumbling out of control and self-destructed so soon after it was launched that U.S. spy satellites and radar could not plot the missile's intended launch angle and flight path.

The North statement threatening more tests came as South Korean officials said intelligence reports showed continued activity at Northern missile sites, suggesting further firings could be in the works.

It was unclear if or when the missiles would fly. Japanese officials said they had no indications another Taepodong test was being prepared, and South Korean officials said the launches were not imminent.

South Korea’s government ordered two airlines to avoid a flight route near the path of North Korean missiles, a civil aviation official said. The Civil Aviation Safety Authority told the two airlines — Asiana Airlines and Korean Air — not to use a flight route over the Sea of Japan starting Friday until July 11, said authority official Choi Seung-hyun said

The North hailed the launches on Wednesday as a success and made no mention in its statement of the Taepodong-2 failure.

“The successful missile launches were part of our military’s regular military drills to strengthen self defense,” said the statement. “As a sovereign country, this is our legal right and we are not bound by any international law or bilateral or multilateral agreements.”

The ministry also denied it had violated a missile moratorium, saying it was only in effect when Pyongyang was in dialogue with the U.S. The statement also blamed the Japanese for making an international issue out of North Korea’s unsolved kidnappings of Japanese citizens.

Meanwhile, the Australian Broadcasting Corp. reported Friday that Australia has decided to curtail its diplomatic ties with North Korea over the tests. Australia is one of a handful of countries that maintains limited diplomatic relations with Pyongyang.

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/13743714/

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hitonme
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Unread post by hitonme » July 7th, 2006, 3:34 pm

Sad to say but war might be imminent with North Korea. They, I mean the Dear Leader is more crazier than the president of Iraq. Plus, the North Koreans have nothing to lose since there is nothing in North Korea except for their missiles, military might, and nuclear, biological, and chemical weapons. Its a Stalinist military regime and they will go down fighting if the United States and Japan does something stupid to piss off the North.

I can't believe these arrogant former U.S. government officals want a military strike to target the launch pads in the North. They do realize what this means right? North will retaliate by invading South Korea. Hundreds of thousands of lives will be lost. North Korea has a whopping 700,000 army, 4000 artillery pieces, and 2500 tanks massed near the DMZ. They have another 500,000 troops defending the capital not to mention 120,000 special forces, the biggest in the world. These guys are freaking ready for war, not just any war, but TOTAL WAR. Thats why Bush wants diplomacy first.

And can you believe Japan wanted economic sanctions against North Korea? America and Britain supported it but the Chinese and Russians didn't. North Korea has said in the past that any sanctions against them is an act of war. Oh, and don't forget we are still constantly at war with them. We signed a cease-fire with them in 1953 not a truce or peace treaty.

MiChuhSuh

Unread post by MiChuhSuh » July 9th, 2006, 1:54 pm

War is coming soon... hopefully the UN will get of their ass for this

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Christina Marie
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Unread post by Christina Marie » July 9th, 2006, 3:47 pm

MiChuhSuh wrote:War is coming soon... hopefully the UN will get of their ass for this


I don't think that N.Korea will even talk to the UN, at least not on any level that will be helpful.

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Christina Marie
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Unread post by Christina Marie » July 9th, 2006, 3:48 pm

U.S. Urges China to Pressure North Korea

By FOSTER KLUG

WASHINGTON - The United States on Sunday pushed China to apply more pressure on North Korea to end its missile tests and return to international nuclear disarmament talks. A top diplomat said the aim is to show that Kim Jong Il's government has "no support in the world."

Undersecretary of State Nicholas Burns also indicated the United States would not grant North Korea the direct talks it is seeking in the wake of its test-firing of seven missiles, including some that possibly could reach the American continent. President Bush has opposed one-on-one talks, too.

"We really don't see the logic of turning this into a test of wills between two countries _ the United States and North Korea," Burns said.


The diplomatic goal is to compel North Korea to return to stalled six-nation talks aimed at ridding the reclusive communist-led nation of its nuclear weapons program, Burns said. The U.S. consistently has rejected direct talks with North Korea, preferring the six-party negotiations, deadlocked since November.

U.S. officials have previously said they would only have direct discussions with North Korea in the context of the six-party talks.

"The problem here is not the lack of discussion between the United States and North Korea," Burns said Sunday. "We're perfectly willing to sit down with them in that six-party environment."

Getting support from China, North Korea's main ally and trading partner, is seen as crucial. Burns, joined by members of Congress, urged Beijing to use its "influence and exert some pressure on the North Korean regime" to return to the talks that involve the Koreas, the United States, China, Russia and Japan.

These efforts, he said, are aimed to "convince the North Koreans that they're isolated, that they have no support in the world, and they've got to come back to this six-party framework."

Chris Hill, the top U.S. envoy to the nuclear negotiations, has been in Asia, talking to his diplomatic counterparts; Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice and President Bush have been calling world leaders in the region; at the United Nations, Japan has proposed a Security Council resolution calling for penalties against North Korea.

The U.S., Britain and France support the idea, but the other two veto-empowered members of the council, China and Russia, are opposed. "We think we've got the votes to pass that," Burns said of the resolution.

Burns expressed confidence that a united message could be sent. China and Russia, he said, "understand that, as two members of the six-party framework, they have a responsibility to use their influence with North Korea."

Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., said that how Beijing handled North Korea would be a "defining issue in our relations with China." He suggested that if China continues to "vacillate" in the United Nations, "there are consequences in our relationship."

"There are many key areas that we are cooperating in that I believe would be affected, including trade, by China's failure to act," McCain said.

Sen. Richard Lugar, chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, is now relenting from his earlier advocacy of direct negotiations.

"The shots eliminated the efficacy of that," said Lugar, R-Ind.

http://www.nctimes.com/articles/2006/07 ... om4680.txt

MiChuhSuh

Unread post by MiChuhSuh » July 10th, 2006, 7:41 am

Christina Marie wrote:
MiChuhSuh wrote:War is coming soon... hopefully the UN will get of their ass for this


I don't think that N.Korea will even talk to the UN, at least not on any level that will be helpful.


this is what I mean by the UN got weak

And I didn't exactly mean "talking" if a war breaks out they better do something because let's say it's just north vs. south and the commies lose

Then the south would have to catch/cradle the north and both countries would collapse without international support. Weneed international support on this

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Christina Marie
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Unread post by Christina Marie » July 11th, 2006, 2:19 am

Scares me :( . And I feel so badly for the people living there. I have seen a couple docs on it, video smuggled out and it is very bleak. So sad.

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Australia and Japan Impose New Sanctions on North Korea

Unread post by Christina Marie » September 19th, 2006, 1:02 pm

Australia and Japan Impose New Sanctions on North Korea


By CHOE SANG-HUN International Herald Tribune
Published: September 19, 2006

SEOUL, South Korea, Sept. 19 — Australia and Japan imposed new financial sanctions on North Korea today, as the United States dismissed appeals from China and South Korea for a softer approach and rallied more international pressure on the North over its nuclear program.

Australia and Japan have little trade with North Korea, so the practical impact of the sanctions will be small, experts said. But they are a sign that Washington and its allies are intent on tightening a financial noose around the Communist North Korean regime and starving it of hard currency from abroad.

Though that strategy is already hurting the North, officials and experts in Beijing and Seoul expressed concern that mounting pressure might prompt the North’s mercurial leaders to lash out defiantly by testing a nuclear weapon — and thereby touch off an arms race in Northeast Asia.

“The Chinese government has always held the position that the issue should be resolved through dialogue, and we are opposed to sanctions,” Qin Gang, the spokesman for the Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman, said today.

In Seoul, Song Min Soon, the chief national security adviser to President Roh Moo Hyun, said that South Korea did not support imposing more sanctions on North Korea. President Roh and President George W. Bush discussed sanctions when they met in Washington five days ago, but they failed to reach any agreement; negotiators for the two countries are due to meet on the issue again on Wednesday.

“Our government position has been consistent,” Mr. Song said. “The matter of sanctions must be considered in a way that helps resolve the nuclear problem.”

In Japan, the new sanctions took the form of an order to Japanese financial institutions to block all transactions by 15 companies and one individual who are suspected of having links to North Korea’s weapons programs. The steps were announced today by Shinzo Abe, the chief cabinet secretary, who is expected to win a party vote on Wednesday that will make him the next Japanese prime minister. Mr. Abe has advocated a hard line against North Korea.

Among the companies subject to the new freeze on transactions are Korean mining, shipping and trading companies and a Swiss manufacturer, Kohas, that has long been suspected of assisting North Korea’s nuclear efforts. The individual named in the freeze order is Jakob Steiger, 65, the president of Kohas.

“By taking these measures, we have demonstrated the resolve of the international community,” Mr. Abe said.

In Australia, the foreign minister, Alexander Downer, took similar steps against a list of companies and individuals that it said were involved in financing North Korea’s reported attempts to build weapons of mass destruction.

“North Korea misguidedly believes that development of a W.M.D. capacity will enhance its security,” Mr. Downer said in a statement. “This is patently untrue. We call on North Korea to recognize this, and to give up its W.M.D. ambitions.” Australia established diplomatic relations with North Korea in 2000.

Today’s sanctions come exactly a year after the United States, Japan, China, Russia and the two Koreas signed an agreement in Beijing, setting out a broad outline of how to phase out the North’s nuclear weapons facilities in return for economic and diplomatic rewards.

That accord quickly disintegrated after the United States Treasury Department persuaded Banco Delta Asia, a bank based in Macao, to freeze the accounts that North Korean trading companies were suspected of using to channel profits from illicit trade. Since then, North Korea has refused to take part in further six-nation talks until the sanctions are lifted.

Far from lifting the freezes, Washington has worked to expand them, persuading banks in other Asian nations to shut down North Korean accounts as well. Experts say that the regime now relies on weapons sales and counterfeiting to finance weapons programs and a comfortable lifestyle for the elite inner circle in a country otherwise racked with poverty.

“The impact was far bigger than the U.S. officials had expected,” Koh Yu Hwan, a North Korea expert at Dongguk University in Seoul, said of the efforts to isolate North Korea financially. “It was a tremendous blow to the regime.”

The North tried in December to open accounts at South Korea’s Woori Bank, which has a branch at a joint inter-Korean industrial park in a North Korean city, the bank said today. The request was rejected by the bank.

In an apparent attempt to force Washington to lift its sanctions, North Korea test-fired seven missiles on July 5. But the United States and Japan pushed a resolution through the United Nations Security Council that urged U.N. members to stop transactions that could aid the North’s weapons programs.

“Now, word is that Iran is the only remaining client for North Korean missiles,” said Cheong Seong Chang, a North Korea expert at Sejong Institute in Seoul. “The sanctions are hurting not only illegal but also legitimate financial transactions for the North.”

Mr. Cheong said he would not rule out the possibility of a North Korean nuclear test now.

“When pressure continues, North Korea won’t be left with room for a wise judgment,” he said. “As was the case with the missile tests, it thinks it should react to a tough action with a tougher counteraction.”

http://www.nytimes.com/2006/09/19/world ... =TOPIXNEWS

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Unread post by BlaKK » September 19th, 2006, 1:25 pm

It would take a stage three missile to pose an immediate threat to the United States, Seeing that it could hit the continental US, as far as New York... However North Korea is years from developing a stage 3 Missile, They tested a stage 2 for the first time and it didn't even get 20 some odd miles off the launch pad... North Korea does NOT pose a threat to the United States, they pose a threat to US policy, interests and statecraft.

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Unread post by Mcminister » September 19th, 2006, 1:37 pm

if the US wages a full war with North Korea ...NK wudnt exzist....and i don think NK wud wana have Heat with USA coz USA wont come alone...the UK n because of NK hard headed ness the UN mite come in too..NK ain shit

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Unread post by SniperSVD » September 19th, 2006, 11:06 pm

Norf korea, go head and stand up, take yo shirt off, twist it around yo head spin it like a helicopta...
now if these fukkas line up with iran and other countries with extreme anti west centiment then we are looking at the end of erff.

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N. Korea Vows To Conduct Nuclear Test

Unread post by Christina Marie » October 4th, 2006, 2:00 pm

N. Korea Vows To Conduct Nuclear Test
cbs3.com

October 03, 2006
The DPRK will in the future conduct a nuclear test under the condition where safety is firmly guaranteed.

North Korea said Tuesday that it will conduct a nuclear test to bolster its self-defense capability amid what it calls increasing U.S. hostility toward the communist regime.

The U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, John Bolton, said that the U.S. would bring up North Korea's statement for discussion Tuesday morning in a regular meeting of the U.N. Security Council.

"A nuclear test by North Korea would be extraordinarily serious," Bolton said in an interview with The Associated Press. "The threat is serious enough that we're certainly going to take this action in the council this morning, by raising it."

Using the acronym for the country's official name, the Democratic People's Republic of Korea, the North's Foreign Ministry said in the official English translation of its statement that: "The DPRK will in the future conduct a nuclear test under the condition where safety is firmly guaranteed."

The statement gave no precise date of when a test might occur.

"North Korea's statement effectively forces the Security Council to take up the issue, even though the six-party negotiations have been conducted outside the U.N. since the time Pyongyang withdrew from the International Atomic Energy Agency," said CBS News foreign affairs analyst Pamela Falk.

"North Korea's brinkmanship is making everyone nervous and there is precious little leverage unless China and Russia agree to take further steps," Falk added.

China, North Korea's neighbor, ally and chief benefactor, had no immediate comment. The North Korean announcement appeared to have caught Chinese officialdom off-guard, coming in the midst of a weeklong National Day holiday.

Japanese Foreign Minister Taro Aso called the purported nuclear test plan a threat to peace, and said a nuclear test would have graver implications than North Korean missile tests in July. Aso called the North's self-described plan "totally unforgivable," and said Japan would react "sternly" if the North conducted a nuclear test, according to Kyodo News agency.

Pyongyang has said it has nuclear weapons, but is not known to have conducted any test to prove its claim. It has not mentioned a nuclear test in previous public statements.

"The U.S. extreme threat of a nuclear war and sanctions and pressure compel the DPRK to conduct a nuclear test, an essential process for bolstering nuclear deterrent, as a corresponding measure for defense," said the statement, carried by the North's official Korean Central News Agency.

The North's "nuclear weapons will serve as reliable war deterrent for protecting the supreme interests of the state and the security of the Korean nation from the U.S. threat of aggression and averting a new war and firmly safeguarding peace and stability on the Korean peninsula under any circumstances," the statement said.

Multilateral talks on the North's nuclear program have been stalled for almost a year. Pyongyang has boycotted the six-nation talks to protest U.S. financial restrictions imposed for its alleged illegal activity, including money laundering and counterfeiting.

The North said Tuesday that its ultimate goal is "to settle hostile relations between the DPRK and the U.S. and to remove the very source of all nuclear threats from the Korean Peninsula and its vicinity," accusing the U.S. of posing a nuclear threat in the region.

http://www.topix.net/content/cbs/141613 ... F2MFOLQRUP

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