Flowing water in Mars!

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NikexCortez

Flowing water in Mars!

Unread post by NikexCortez » December 6th, 2006, 1:26 pm

you heard right. scientists are saying that there is a high possibility that there is still water on mars actually flowing!
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/pages/li...in_page_id=1770

Does water STILL flow on Mars?

By JULIE WHELDON, Science Correspondent Last updated at 17:55pm on 6th December 2006

Striking new images of the Red Planet have raised hopes life could be found on Mars after all.

Scientists say they have photographic evidence that suggests liquid water may have been on the planet as little as five years ago.

Experts last night said Mars now appears more active than previously thought and the latest study shows why it is vital to continue to search for life on our planetary neighbour.

The first images of Mars' surface were taken in the 1960s and they suggested it was a dusty, cratered world rather like our Moon.

Now a new set of photographs has suggested that liquid water may have flowed on the planet a mere five years ago.

The discovery resulted from images taken by the Mars Global Surveyor which first recorded gullies and trenches that could have been made by fast-flowing water coursing down cliffs and crater walls.

Scientists in the USA decided to retake images of the gullies to search for any sign of recent activity.

johnnny
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Unread post by johnnny » December 7th, 2006, 2:27 pm

that shit looks real, water at sand pits acts the same way like in those photos, i dont think there is life on mars i know there is life on mars.
But i think its mostly just bacteria

Without plate tectonics, radioactive decay wouldnt be enough to heat the planet to sustain organisms the size of rats imo

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Unread post by SniperSVD » December 8th, 2006, 2:52 pm

great lets find some bugs that would do better in our atmostphere and probly take over worse than cockroaches.

abc12345
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Unread post by abc12345 » December 11th, 2006, 1:18 am

Who cares???

We already found alien intelligence. The first recorded date kept highly classifed was 1947.

Ohhh man some day I wish when I wake up in the morning...

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Unread post by abc12345 » December 11th, 2006, 1:25 am

Also, that's not water. I had to take a piss on my way to Jupiter. Pluto wasn't an option any more since it was taken off the list of milky way's planets so the borders were closed to vacations.

Jupiter was nice though. You know how nice it feels to sit in a roller coaster like train thing going through long tube in 0 degree celcius temperature and looking at the rivers of lava and the red rocky sands and mountains outside.

Wonderful tour. Beautiful. Good thing I brought that coat. Good thing I took the ticket and didn't land on the surface, aka came to the planet illigally. I would've friggin melted.

You should go there. Beautiful. The ticket only costs you a hundred. Plus you get free food and a hotel room. The cutest creature thing I've ever seen...

Hmmm... :D

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Unread post by abc12345 » December 11th, 2006, 1:25 am

abc12345 wrote:Also, that's not water. I had to take a piss on my way to Jupiter. Pluto wasn't an option any more since it was taken off the list of milky way's planets so the borders were closed to vacations.

Jupiter was nice though. You know how nice it feels to sit in a roller coaster like train thing going through long tube in 0 degree celcius temperature and looking at the rivers of lava and the red rocky sands and mountains outside.

Wonderful tour. Beautiful. Good thing I brought that coat. Good thing I took the ticket and didn't land on the surface, aka came to the planet illigally. I would've friggin melted.

You should go there. Beautiful. The ticket only costs you a hundred. Plus you get free food and a hotel room. The cutest creature thing I've ever seen...

Hmmm... :D
Chronic.

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Unread post by Dregsta » December 11th, 2006, 9:32 pm

abc12345 wrote:Who cares???
Seriously what a shitty thrend nothing but smoke and mirrors to keep the "cattles" or "sheeps" stimulated on something THAT IS NOT A CONSPIRACY!

Maybe the appropriate post woulda ben:"Face structure and pyramids found on Mars!".

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Unread post by Dregsta » December 11th, 2006, 9:34 pm

Dregsta wrote:
abc12345 wrote:Who cares???
Seriously what a _____ thrend nothing but smoke and mirrors to keep the "cattles" or "sheeps" stimulated on something THAT IS NOT A CONSPIRACY!

Maybe the appropriate post woulda ben:"Face structure and pyramids found on Mars!".
Seriously what a S H I T T Y thrend.

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Unread post by johnnny » January 8th, 2007, 7:42 am

Two NASA space probes that visited Mars 30 years ago may have found alien microbes on the Red Planet and inadvertently killed them, a scientist is theorizing.

The Viking space probes of 1976-77 were looking for the wrong kind of life, so they didn't recognize it, a geology professor at Washington State University said.

Dirk Schulze-Makuch presented his theory in a paper delivered at a meeting of the American Astronomical Society in Seattle, Washington.

The paper was released Sunday.

Based on a more expansive view of where life can take root, the paper's findings may prompt NASA to look for a different type of Martian life when its next spacecraft to visit Mars is launched later this year, one of the space agency's top scientists said.

Last month, scientists excitedly reported that new photographs of Mars showed geologic changes that suggest water occasionally flows there -- the most tantalizing sign that Mars is hospitable to life.

In the 1970s, the Viking mission found no signs of life.

But it was looking for Earth-like life, in which salt water is the internal liquid of living cells.

Given the cold dry conditions of Mars, life could have evolved on Mars with the key internal fluid consisting of a mix of water and hydrogen peroxide, said Schulze-Makuch.

That's because a water-hydrogen peroxide mix stays liquid at very low temperatures, or -68 degrees Fahrenheit, and doesn't destroy cells when it freezes. It can suck water vapor out of the air.

The Viking experiments of the 1970s wouldn't have noticed hydrogen peroxide-based life and, in fact, would have killed it by drowning and overheating the microbes, said Schulze-Makuch.

One Viking experiment seeking life on Mars poured water on soil. That would have essentially drowned hydrogen peroxide-based life, he said. And different experiment heated the soil to see if something would happen which would have baked Martian microbes.

"The problem was that they didn't have any clue about the environment on Mars at that time," Schulze-Makuch said. "This kind of adaptation makes sense from a biochemical viewpoint."

Even Earth has something somewhat related. He points to an Earth bug called the bombardier beetle that produces a boiling-hot spray that is 25 percent hydrogen peroxide as a defense weapon.

Schulze-Makuch acknowledges he can't prove that Martian microbes exist, but given the Martian environment and how evolution works, "it makes sense."

In recent years, scientists have found life on Earth in conditions that were once thought too harsh, such as an ultra-acidic river in Spain and ice-covered lakes in Antarctica.

Schulze-Makuch's research coincides with work being completed by a National Research Council panel nicknamed the "weird life" committee. The group worries that scientists may be too Earth-centric when looking for extraterrestrial life.

The problem for scientists is that "you only find what you're looking for," said Penn State University geosciences professor Katherine Freeman, a reviewer of the NRC work.

A new NASA Mars mission called Phoenix is set for launch this summer, and one of the scientists involved said he is eager to test the new theory about life on Mars.

However, scientists must come up with a way to do that using the mission's existing scientific instruments, said NASA astrobiologist and Phoenix co-investigator Chris McKay.

He said the Washington State scientist's paper piqued his interest.

"Logical consistency is nice, but it's not enough anymore," McKay said.

Other experts said the new concept is plausible, but more work is needed before they are convinced.

"I'm open to the possibility that it could be the case," said astrobiologist Mitch Sogin of the Marine Biological Lab in Woods Hole, Massachusetts.

A member of the National Research Council committee, Sogin also cautioned against "just-so stories about what is possible."

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Unread post by johnnny » January 8th, 2007, 7:43 am

SniperSVD wrote:great lets find some bugs that would do better in our atmostphere and probly take over worse than cockroaches.
you never know what a parasite outside of our earth will be like

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Unread post by Qdawg » January 8th, 2007, 11:02 am

[quote="abc12345"]Who cares???[/quote]

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Unread post by johnnnny » February 16th, 2007, 7:42 am


North Star
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Unread post by North Star » March 7th, 2007, 12:37 pm

i believe it, of course where thier is water thier is life, the reason no one can see any life forms on the planet is because of the vibrational field, which is 2 fast for us 2 see.

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Unread post by KINGFEAR62 » March 7th, 2007, 2:14 pm

i hope one day while im alive that someone will walk on mars

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Unread post by johnnnny » March 20th, 2007, 5:33 am

North Star wrote:i believe it, of course where thier is water thier is life, the reason no one can see any life forms on the planet is because of the vibrational field, which is 2 fast for us 2 see.
that doesnt make sense, if it was moving too fast to see then we could obviously see past it :)

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