Taggers Charged/Convicted

From tagging to piecing to gang graffiti to clothing styles to the art of tattoos.
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Unread post by Buu » November 6th, 2007, 4:34 am

These days its not just tagbangers that fuck with guns, "real" artists and crews do it too when beef gets heated. Your from LA, shouldnt you be aware of this? TKO vs MTA for example...

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Unread post by Common Sense » November 6th, 2007, 1:31 pm

Thursday, October 4, 2007

Tagger Sentenced to 2 Years

By Laura Nesbitt
Mountain View Telegraph

The first of five juveniles charged in a two-day graffiti vandalism spree in Moriarty in June has been committed to state custody for two years.
The vandals spray-painted vehicles and houses up and down several streets in Moriarty on June 18 and 19. Five juveniles were charged, all between 13 and 15 years old.
A dispositional hearing for the first youth was Sept. 24 in front of Judge Kevin R. Sweazea in District Court in Estancia.
The term "dispositional hearing" is used in Children's Court, according to Assistant District Attorney Wes Jensen. In adult court the hearing would be called a sentencing.
According to Jensen, the first youth from Moriarty went for a 15-day evaluation at the Youth Diagnostic and Development Center in Albuquerque. The staff there made the recommendation that the youth be sentenced to a two-year detention in the custody of the state Children, Youth and Families Department Juvenile Justice Services.
Two years is the maximum penalty that any child can face.
"(The state) will make their determination where to put the kid," Jensen said regarding which CYFD facility the teen will be placed. "And they will make sure that he gets whatever treatment and counseling is necessary."
A second youth also admitted guilt and is undergoing a 15-day diagnostic evaluation at YDDC and then will be sentenced on Oct. 9.
"He had three different petitions," Jensen said.
A petition in Children's Court would be referred to as a criminal complaint in adult court.
The youth's first petition involved the June graffiti incidents, while the second and third petitions stemmed from two separate incidents between June and August.
The remaining three boys will have hearings Oct. 16.
Jensen said he has "come up with plea offers" and hopes the children's attorneys will accept them.
Jensen said the plea offers would address restitution for the city and property owners who sustained damage from the vandalism.
"Hopefully everything will be done by the end of the month," Jensen said.
http://www.mvtelegraph.com/mountain/599 ... -04-07.htm

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YUTS
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Unread post by YUTS » November 13th, 2007, 5:51 pm

Buu wrote:These days its not just tagbangers that fu-- with guns, "real" artists and crews do it too when beef gets heated. Your from LA, shouldnt you be aware of this? TKO vs MTA for example...
I am aware of that , but its mostly tag bangers pulling the straps , i know peeps get heated and start blasting but its usually the knuckle heads from the crews and not the true writers , real writers handle their business on the street battling.

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Unread post by YUTS » November 13th, 2007, 5:58 pm

Also , this may be only in my head but once a tagging crew starts rolling strapped i feel they have crossed over into tag banging it might not be the conventional definition but its not much different from banging

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Unread post by Common Sense » March 11th, 2008, 11:28 am

Elusive graffiti tagger 'Spek' is finally tagged, police say

February 17, 2008

SALEM - For nearly a decade, he was just a shadow of a man. Police chased him - sometimes literally - from the Back Bay to Brighton, through suburban rail yards and city streets in the middle of the night. According to authorities, Adam Brandt was there and then, just like that, he was gone. But his alleged tag - "Spek" - remained, staining trucks, buses, and train cars from Boston to Salem. He became, according to police, one of the most prolific graffiti vandals in Eastern Massachusetts, potentially responsible for hundreds of thousands of dollars in property damage. And even when authorities charged Brandt for his alleged work - once in May 2003 and a second time last March - the slim, blue-eyed lumberyard worker proved elusive. His punishment each time: probation and community service, nothing more.

But the police officers pursuing Brandt - Detective Bill Kelley of the Boston Police Department and Lieutenant Nancy O'Loughlin of the Massachusetts Bay Transpor tation Authority Police - did not despair. In time, they figured, their nine-year effort to charge him with dozens of cases would pay off. This month, Brandt was arrested in Salem and charged with 16 counts of tagging and 16 counts of malicious wanton destruction to property.

In the graffiti underworld, this was big news. Brandt, who did not return phone calls for this story, is well known to his peers, authorities said, and a member of a graffiti crew called Illustrate Total Destruction, or ITD, respected by those wielding spray paint cans, decried by the people they vandalized. His arrest, one of the biggest vandal busts that local police have made in recent years, reveals a slice of the subculture: Graffiti, perceived to be an urban problem, is more often than not perpetrated by suburban kids who are not actually kids.

The fact that Brandt is 27 years old and holds down a job at Moynihan Lumber in North Reading hardly surprised police when they learned his identity. Now, with the evidence gathered at Brandt's apartment this month, he could face charges in dozens of other cases, authorities say. Salem investigators say they found evidence that may link Brandt to graffiti activity in New Jersey and Rhode Island. And the officers who have been tracking Spek's tags for years - Kelley and O'Loughlin - are hoping they have enough evidence this time to put Brandt behind bars.

"He's just been a constant pain since about '99," said O'Loughlin, a 47-year-old graffiti expert with short graying hair and a steely gaze. "He and his crew have just been a constant. They've hit the Blue Line, the commuter rail, the Red Line, and the Orange Line. It's kind of like when you have a sore tooth and you keep putting your tongue on it because it won't go away. That's what they were like."

Graffiti, long the bane of urban centers, has increasingly crept into smaller communities in recent years, plaguing police from working-class Lynn to upscale Marblehead. Police in Danvers have begun assigning specific officers to track vandals. Malden spent $45,000 last year to clean up graffiti. And yet, for departments large and small, graffiti is a hard crime to crack as some people seek the thrill of tagging overpasses, rail cars, and residential fences in the middle of the night and the notoriety that sometimes comes with their work.

Vandals, be they self-described graffiti artists or gang members marking territory, can finish a tag in seconds or just a few minutes. And with the aid of the Internet, they are organized like never before. Recent topics on one popular graffiti website include how to rid your house of evidence, how to get a decent lawyer, and which graffiti artists deserve the most respect.

Without question, Kelley said, Brandt is among them. His alleged tag - Spek, often accompanied by the letters ITD and the crew's circle T emblem - began appearing in Eastern Massachusetts in the late 1990s, authorities said. And Brandt soon earned a reputation as someone willing to go almost anywhere, police said, including tough Boston neighborhoods where the taggers were typically gang members.

"He was everywhere," said Kelley, who began tackling vandalism more than a decade ago as a Boston patrolman. "He was in Brighton. He was in Back Bay. He was at Blue Hill Avenue and Seaver Street. It appeared there wasn't a neighborhood where Adam Brandt wouldn't go and tag. That's how he got respect."

As the tags spread, so did the cost. O'Loughlin estimates that Brandt's alleged crew has caused nearly a million dollars in damage to MBTA property in recent years and that Brandt himself is responsible for a good bit of that total. But for years authorities did not know Spek's identity. And even when they arrested Brandt, he went free.

Late one night in May 2003, Boston police officers caught him and another man carrying backpacks and tagging a trash receptacle in Allston. As Brandt ran from the officers, according to the police report, he hollered to his friend, "Dump the bags." But the officers caught up to the men - and found the bags, too, which were filled with spray paint cans.

However, the case didn't go far. According to court records, Brandt was placed on probation, ordered to pay $300 in court fees, and asked to participate in a city cleanup program.

At the time, Kelley said, investigators hadn't made the alleged connection between Spek and Brandt. Kelley said he ultimately learned Spek's identity by talking to others in the graffiti world. And when Kelley arrested Brandt while working a paid detail last March in the Back Bay and charged him with tagging the bathroom wall of the Cactus Club Restaurant, Kelley said, "I knew . . . that he was Spek."

Still, Brandt walked. A judge placed him on pretrial probation last September and ordered him to serve 50 hours of community service. Kelley said police did not have what they needed to charge Brandt with the litany of crimes they allege he has committed.

But right about the same time, Officer Dennis King, a nine-year veteran of the Salem Police Department, began working in a new unit focused on quality-of-life issues, like graffiti, in his North Shore city. He soon began investigating what he called "a trail of destruction" left behind by a tagger named Spek.

King spoke with T police in December, learned of Brandt's name, then ran it through Salem's database, according to police reports. He discovered that Salem police officers had pulled Brandt over in both 2005 and 2006. After meeting with Kelley in early January and comparing photographs of Brandt's alleged tags, King said he had what he needed to bring him in.

An arrest warrant was issued Feb. 1. Five days later, Brandt turned himself in, King said, and then Salem investigators obtained a warrant to search Brandt's apartment near downtown Salem. Inside, according to police, they found spray paint cans and nozzles, sketches of graffiti, and at least one document linking him to the name Spek.

"I knew how big he was," said King, who said he came to know Brandt's alleged artistic flair in recent months. But King said he never saw it as art. "That's not expression," he said. "That's a crime."

Brandt, if convicted, could face up to two or three years in prison for each charge that he faces. He could lose his driver's license and be forced to pay restitution to his alleged victims. Some in Salem are already lining up for what they believed they are owed.

But others, like Robert Matvichuk, general manager of F.W. Webb in Salem, say they won't bother, even if it Brandt is convicted. Come spring, said Matvichuk, he plans to get some spray paint of his own - red-brick in color, ideally - to paint over the graffiti that Brandt allegedly left on his building more than a year ago. Then, Matvichuk said, it will be over.
http://www.boston.com/news/local/articl ... ?page=full


South Side graffiti artist sentenced, must pay restitution

An Allegheny County judge sentenced a graffiti artist to more than eight years of probation and nearly 900 hours of community service.
Michael Beatty, 20, of Verona, who was ordered to pay nearly $6,000 in restitution, pleaded guilty to 10 counts of criminal mischief and one count of criminal conspiracy.

Common Pleas Judge Anthony Mariani imposed the sentence Wednesday. Beatty was arrested after spray painting several buildings in January 2007 in the South Side. Police identified his graffiti as "MOVE" with the tag "NTB."



Graf Tagger Get's 2 years

December 07

Eric Hare, 23, was known as Cier. Police say he was the leader of a group in Oklahoma City that started a tagging war against a group in Tulsa. The investigation started in Summer of 2006 and is still not over.

Cier is behind bars tonight for his art work, that’s because for his canvas he choose other people’s property. He painted on planes, billboards and buildings. He was doing all this to win a tagging war.

Cier documented all his work on Myspace.

“He will now serve two years in a state penitentiary and a five year suspended sentence,” says Paco Balderrama with the Oklahoma City Police.

Oklahoma City estimates this tagging war cost the city close to $60,000.

The way the law is now makes it hard for prosecutors to get a felony conviction for tagging. It currently states the damage has to be $2,500 at one location. One legislator hopes to change that.

“Anybody convicted of defacing property with paint or any other defacing, $500 or greater will be punishable by a felony,” says Senator Todd Lamb, R-District 47.

Senator Todd Lamb also hopes to combine different locations into one incident.

“If you have a hundred dollars here, and a hundred dollars there, sprinkled throughout the community or throughout the state, we will be able to combine those damages and get to the $500 threshold,” says Senator Lamb.

These tagging wars will also be considered gang related.

“Although most of these individuals involved are middle class to upper class white males, we are considering them gangs,” says Balderrama.

Oklahoma City Police are in support of the legislation and say they won the tagging war against Cier. They are still investigating and have several suspects they hope to convict in the future.


Teen Belk Charges with Felony Tagging

Spray-painted hands spell it out in sign language from the side of a locomotive. It yells mutely - 120 feet long - from an Interstate-880 sound wall. And from San Francisco to Santa Cruz, the name pops up more often than someone running for office: BELK.

Belk, a.k.a. Daniel Cortez Aldama, 18, of Fremont, who police consider Public Vandal No. 1, was arrested in December on four felony counts of illegal graffiti.

“The sad thing is that he actually has a lot of talent,” said Erik Hove of the San Jose police anti-graffiti team.

“This guy could’ve had a career as a graphic artist.”

Aldama proudly uploaded photographs of his work on the photo-sharing network Flickr. And police said at his home they found scads of photos of his work and videos of him doing it.

Cops figure he has caused at least $100,000 in damage, including $2,000 at the Fremont Adult School, which Aldama attends.

They said Aldama told them he knew what he was doing is wrong, but being a tagger is addicting.

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Unread post by Silencioso » March 11th, 2008, 2:05 pm

I was a tagger when tagging first hit L.A. back in the 80's. It started out 100% non-gang related then slowly the gang banger mentality started to creep in. My crew started to appear on gang enemy lists. Crews got bigger and more visible. Taggers started traveling in bigger groups. Crew rivalries got fiercer.

That's just L.A. Los Angeles people can make a gang out of anything - stoner gangs, punk rocker gang, preppy gangs, surfer gangs.

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Unread post by Cold Bear » March 12th, 2008, 6:10 am

This might have been a little after your time but do you remember certain crews on the westside that did exactly how you saying about traveling in groups, carrying gats, jacking fools? Like DHT and NHD, and other ones. Of course there was many more crews that I can't remember, maybe you can name some?

Shit I remember I got hit up when I was about 11 or 12 on the westside and dudes much older than me were hitting me up 'where you from, where you from', like 5 deep, and afterwards two dudes sitting on a bench were like you want us to get those fools for you, and I was like nah their like 5 deep there's only two of you. Then one dude was like yeah but we strapped! This was a bunch of taggers!

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Unread post by Silencioso » March 12th, 2008, 1:32 pm

OFA -Out For Action- was around when I was tagging. They were one of the first tagging crews to start banging. I remember Non Stop Action crew and Die Hard Kings as early tag bangers in my area.

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Unread post by perongregory » March 12th, 2008, 5:33 pm

Silencioso wrote:I was a tagger when tagging first hit L.A. back in the 80's. It started out 100% non-gang related then slowly the gang banger mentality started to creep in. My crew started to appear on gang enemy lists. Crews got bigger and more visible. Taggers started traveling in bigger groups. Crew rivalries got fiercer.

That's just L.A. Los Angeles people can make a gang out of anything - stoner gangs, punk rocker gang, preppy gangs, surfer gangs.
exactly, and fools forget even though its art the whole graff culture is a street culture...violence was always around even back in NY. Plus like yuts was saying you always have at least a couple heads from the local hood in the crew and shit that wanna be on that bangin shit, even if you are a legit crew.

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Unread post by YUTS » March 14th, 2008, 4:03 pm

Silencioso wrote:OFA -Out For Action- was around when I was tagging. They were one of the first tagging crews to start banging. I remember Non Stop Action crew and Die Hard Kings as early tag bangers in my area.
yeah OFA and D2D DIS were the Crews Bangin at my school back in 93-95. I have a homeboy from D2DIS now theyre going for full out bangin status with clicks and lining up with local hoods.

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Unread post by Common Sense » May 28th, 2008, 4:42 pm

Alleged tagger seen on YouTube is arrested

"Buket" seen applying his moniker to an MTA bus in broad daylight as passersby and passengers watch in surprise.


Cyrus Yazdani is a 24-year-old San Jose State University graduate with a degree in art and a job as a convention planner in Las Vegas.

But authorities say Yazdani is also "Buket," one of Los Angeles' most prolific taggers who is featured in several heavily viewed YouTube videos defacing signs and buses. His most popular video -- with nearly 170,000 page views -- shows him clambering behind the Hollywood Freeway sign near Melrose Avenue and tagging the structure as traffic speeds below.

Los Angeles County sheriff's investigators arrested Yazdani on Tuesday, saying that his moniker has marked hundreds of freeway overpasses, concrete walls and transit buses across the state and southern Nevada. He is believed responsible for upward of $150,000 in property damage along the Los Angeles River and in the areas patrolled by the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department -- and at least that much in other parts of California.

Yazdani was nabbed when he showed up to meet with his probation officer and booked on multiple charges of felony vandalism.

Authorities are used to dealing with graffiti vandals -- even those who display their handiwork on the Internet. But there is general agreement that "Buket" is different.

According to investigators, Yazdani is a professional graphic artist. Though he works in Las Vegas, he is frequently in Los Angeles, living with roommates at a downtown Los Angeles loft. He moved to Los Angeles two years ago, authorities said.

He's older than many taggers -- but his age hasn't kept him down, said Sheriff's Deputy Devin Vanderlaan, who has tracked Buket for months.

"He's one of the most prolific taggers we've seen," Vanderlaan said. "He's on buses, overpasses, in the L.A. riverbed -- he's everywhere."

The investigators said they spotted four "Buket" scrawls Tuesday during the short trip from downtown to the Crenshaw District to pick Yazdani up at the probation office.

But you don't have to drive throughout L.A. to see "Buket's" work -- and that's what did him in, authorities said.

"Buket," they said, became something of an Internet sensation with the daredevil tagging 20 feet above the busy Hollywood Freeway -- vandalism captured on videotape and posted with a rap soundtrack on You Tube and numerous tagger-related blogs.

Another daylight attack captured on video appears to show "Buket" applying his moniker to a Metropolitan Transportation Authority bus as passersby and passengers watch in surprise.

It's the bus video that got Vanderlaan's attention.

"If he's brave enough to tag on an MTA bus in the middle of the day, I've gotta find out who this guy is," he said.
Vanderlaan started investigating "Buket" in January, when the Internet videos began appearing. It turned out, he quickly learned, that "Buket" was a well-known figure in the graffiti world whose work had been featured in the art book "Los Angeles Graffiti."

The book's author, Roger Gastman, said "Buket" is known as a "bomber" who tries to cover as much ground with his graffiti as possible.

"He did a lot of in-your-face graffiti," Gastman said. "He goes big, bold and as many places as he can."

Sheriff's investigators said they determined that "Buket" was the moniker for Yazdani, who has been arrested several times on suspicion of graffiti vandalism in cities including Los Angeles, Long Beach and San Jose. He was on probation for a 2007 tagging conviction.

But finding Yazdani proved difficult, in part because he works in Las Vegas and travels frequently in California, authorities said.

Yazdani, who was booked into Los Angeles County Jail, could not be reached for comment.

But Vanderlaan said that when he was arrested, Yazdani insisted that he "doesn't do it anymore."

Investigators, however, say they don't believe him. Vanderlaan said they found spray cans at Yazdani's downtown loft along with images stored in a computer that allegedly showed him in action.

Comments From The Public
1. Dip him in paint, like the Joker did to Batman

Submitted by: Notag
4:30 PM PDT, May 28, 2008

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2. We are supposed to jump for joy that they caught a mere "tagger". now lets see if they can put that much energy into keeping the streets safe for kids to walk home from school with out some previously conviucted child molester 2 step behind them...

Submitted by: im just saying
4:14 PM PDT, May 28, 2008

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3. Graffiti will never stop, Self Promotion lives forever. Free Bucket!!!

Submitted by: TrillLife
4:10 PM PDT, May 28, 2008

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4. In prison, he will be a bucket of love.

Submitted by: NewName
3:50 PM PDT, May 28, 2008

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5. The difference between tagging and outdoor advertising is that people actually pay to put advertising on billboards. Taking something and not paying for it is akin to stealing. It's a "brand" of what? What are you selling? Childish, wanton destruction. Spray paint your own property. That's your right!

Submitted by: The Difference
3:46 PM PDT, May 28, 2008

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6. Have him "work" at night, and we'll solve the problem for less than a dollar's worth of ammunition.

Submitted by: Send him to Texas
3:45 PM PDT, May 28, 2008

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7. All of public has been given free admission to this real life saga that will be picked up by another up and coming STREETSTAR just the same as this BUKET. So as taxpayers pay for his housing and meals for the next year or so, all of us public runofthemill can go to work, come home and maybe fill the tired portion of our free lives with false happyness day after day after day. So, everyone keep on stopping when the red light tells you to, buy your gas, kill the earth, and keep all of your self absorbed destructive daily routines out of your minds with an empty happiness called YOUR LIFE. To all against the grain: keep on keepin on...

Submitted by: typical bystandard
3:35 PM PDT, May 28, 2008

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8. Maybe the people who are "down" with this form of tagging wouldn't mind if we tag your homes, schools, businesses and streets. What he did was not art. It was juvenile. The cost to the city and state diverts funds away from things like schools.

Submitted by: BK
3:34 PM PDT, May 28, 2008

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9. The great thing about snivling public crybabies that have full time jobs, stop at redlights, pay taxes toward bombs all deep down wish that they had something else in life than thier daily routine. This BUKET character (cont.)

Submitted by: typical bystandard
3:34 PM PDT, May 28, 2008

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10. Where is there sense of civic pride? If you feel you need to tag something, buy a 4 x 8 in sheet of plywood for your place and tag it all you want! I don't want to see this stuff when I travel through town. As far as discipline, arrest them and put them on a work detail that forever cleans the taggings throughout the city.

Submitted by: Wahoodan
3:31 PM PDT, May 28, 2008

http://www.latimes.com/news/printeditio ... ffitiboard

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Re: Taggers Charged/Convicted

Unread post by Common Sense » August 13th, 2008, 9:47 am

New Laws Affecting Convicted Taggers


Final Vote May Allow L.A. County To Fine Taggers

Aug 12, 2008
LOS ANGELES (CBS) ― An ordinance tentatively approved today would enable the county to fine taggers for the damage they cause.

The Board of Supervisors will take a final vote on the ordinance next week.

If approved, it would take effect in 30 days, county spokesman Brian Lew
said.

Supervisor Gloria Molina came up with the idea after a Pico Rivera grandmother was gunned down Aug. 10, 2007, when she tried to stop a graffiti vandal from defacing a wall near her home.

The average taxpayer cost to catch a tagger is $665, and the average
cost of removing or painting over graffiti is $552 per incident, according to
Chief Executive Officer William Fujioka.

In response to the Pico Rivera killing, the county created a six-month
pilot program known as the Vandalism Enforcement Team, which targeted taggers in Pico Rivera and the unincorporated area near Whittier.

Between Jan. 6 and June 30, the team arrested 168 taggers who had caused an estimated $345,000 in damage, according to sheriff's Capt. Michael Rothans.

Violent crime in those areas also dropped, he said, and none of the
suspects initially arrested were caught reoffending
.


Jul 31, 2008
Calif. Law Requires Graffiti Vandals Clean Up
SACRAMENTO (AP) ― Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger has signed into law a measure that requires those convicted of graffiti to clean up their scrawls and possibly keep the surface clean for one year.

Los Angeles sponsored the legislation, which became law Wednesday. City officials say Los Angeles has seen a more than 25 percent increase in graffiti in the past three years, from 25 million square feet of marred surfaces in 2005 to 31.7 million in the year that ended Wednesday.

The law makes it mandatory for a person convicted of graffiti vandalism to repair the property when possible.

However, a judge could decide not to order the defendant to risk injury by cleaning up graffiti on a sign hanging over the freeway.

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